Sufferer & the Witness

The Sufferer & the Witness

5.0 1
by Rise Against
     
 

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The Sufferer & the Witness finds Rise Against continuing on the path begun on 2004's well-received Siren Song of the Counter Culture. Their melodic hardcore may still sound more mainstream accessible, but this can hardly be looked at as a bad thing. After all, the band's

Overview

The Sufferer & the Witness finds Rise Against continuing on the path begun on 2004's well-received Siren Song of the Counter Culture. Their melodic hardcore may still sound more mainstream accessible, but this can hardly be looked at as a bad thing. After all, the band's sincerity and passion emerge very much intact -- their socially conscious approach no less pressing -- and new and old fans alike should take to Sufferer with open arms. With producers Bill Stevenson and Jason Livermore manning the controls this time around, the band's inner grit is aptly drawn out amid all the pit-ready choruses and fist-in-the-air, stirring lyrics. As such, Rise Against continue to muscularly confront political and personal grievances to the tune of swirling guitars, assertive rhythms, and Tim McIlrath's sandpapered vocals. However, "Chamber the Cartridge" doesn't quite open the record with the same acidic bite as past lead tracks, as the chorus is lacking something in its delivery to really hit a nerve. This later happens again in songs like "Under the Knife" and the ferocious-yet-still-slightly-missing "Worth Dying For," but moments like these are, in truth, more the exception than the rule. "Injection" and "Ready to Fall" bring things back into invigorating Rise Against territory early on, while "Bricks" stands out as a vicious blast of old-school hardcore energy and power. This record is basically one shout-along, mosh-worthy song after another, though the guys do throw in some interesting moments outside of continual rushes of pure adrenaline. "Prayer of the Refugee" jarringly alternates between plaintive guitars and weary singing to an empowered chorus and exploding rhythm section to affectingly address the plight of displaced families of war; the frustrated disconnect distressing a troubled relationship is represented surprisingly well in "The Approaching Curve," with its driving use of spoken word and complementary female backing vocals. Essentially, The Sufferer & the Witness showcases Rise Against maturing within the realms of major-label hardcore revivalism, while still remaining relevant and exciting. So even with the occasional letdown, there's a lot to be said for Rise Against pulling everything off with as much substance and strength as they do the whole way through. [This is the "clean" version of the album that omits profanities.]

Product Details

Release Date:
07/04/2006
Label:
Geffen Records
UPC:
0602498594117
catalogNumber:
000697702
Rank:
144198

Related Subjects

Tracks

Album Credits

Performance Credits

Rise Against   Primary Artist
Brandon Barnes   Drums,Group Member
Chad Price   Background Vocals
Chris Chasse   Guitar,Background Vocals,Group Member
Joe Principe   Bass,Background Vocals,Group Member
Tim McIlrath   Guitar,Vocals,Group Member
Emily Schambra   Background Vocals

Technical Credits

J. Peter Robinson   Art Direction
Bill Stevenson   Producer,Engineer
Andrew Berlin   Engineer,String Arrangements,Piano Arrangement
Rise Against   Composer
Christopher Jak   String Arrangements,Piano Arrangement
Tim McIlrath   Composer,Author
Missy Worth   Management
Johnny Schou   Engineer,String Arrangements,Piano Arrangement
Todd Russell   Art Direction

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The Sufferer & the Witness 4.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 14 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
Although not as sublimely perfect as Siren Song Of The Counter Culture, this highly-anticipated (by me, anyway) CD is a very worthy follow-up to what I consider the best punk album ever made. While tracks like "Chamber The Cartridge" and "Ready To Fall" have been getting all the press, my favorites are "Prayer Of The Refugee" with it's changing rhythms, melodies and moods (something Rise Against has done often and well going back to Revolutions Per Minute), the hard-charging "Drones" and my absolute favorite and instant classic "Behind Closed Doors" whose brilliantly-constructed lyrics prove that real political anger (as opposed to the wimpy Green Day-style substitute) can still can pack a raw punch in modern punk.
Guest More than 1 year ago
this cd was amaazing.. most bands that come out with a new cd a long time after their last one change a lot in a bad way. rise againsr changed but not much and it wasnt bad and it also wasnt for a bad reason. but it also wasnt boring and to much like their last cd.
Guest More than 1 year ago
These guys definetly deserve this review! This is the best punk album I have ever heard! They're lyricaly, and musically inclined, and a tad above their last album. Why not go for it?
Guest More than 1 year ago
They're AMAZING! the reason, my boyfriend doesn't like my taste in rock music. He's more into Frank Sinatra Jr., Postal Service, Death Cab For Cutie, and so on... then I told him to take a chance to listen this album because it's a really good work out album. Of course he loved it and now everytime we go out we'll listen to that album many times.
Know More than 1 year ago
This is Rise Against's second major label album, and it is truely a triumph. Whether you are already a fan, or if this is the first album by them that you're getting, it should be pleasing.
Rise against comes up with a slightly new, more mature sound with this record, and it works perfectly. Their lyrics are still some of the best I've heard in music today, or any at all. They have a way of being poetic, catchy, simple, and meaningful all at the same time. Especially in "The Good left Undone", which has to be one of my favorite Rise Against songs.
Though many of their lyrics are political (liberal punk), which might stop some people from getting this album, Rise Against has a way of writing that even if you don't agree with their political stance, you can still enjoy this album. I know many people who are quite conservative and still love theses guys.
This is definitly a record to listen all the way through, and not just skip to the songs you already know. And, like every other Rise Against record, if there are a few tracks that you don't like at first, just keep listening to them, they have a way of hitting you eventually, and then you'll never get enough of them.

A truly accomplished record from a phenomenal band.
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