The Sugar-planter's Manual: Being a Treatise on the Art of Obtaining Sugar from the Sugar-can

The Sugar-planter's Manual: Being a Treatise on the Art of Obtaining Sugar from the Sugar-can

by William Julian Evans
     
 

This is an EXACT reproduction of a book published before 1923. This IS NOT an OCR'd book with strange characters, introduced typographical errors, and jumbled words. This book may have occasional imperfections such as missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. that were either part of the original artifact, or were introduced by the scanning process.… See more details below

Overview

This is an EXACT reproduction of a book published before 1923. This IS NOT an OCR'd book with strange characters, introduced typographical errors, and jumbled words. This book may have occasional imperfections such as missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. that were either part of the original artifact, or were introduced by the scanning process. We believe this work is culturally important, and despite the imperfections, have elected to bring it back into print as part of our continuing commitment to the preservation of printed works worldwide. We appreciate your understanding of the imperfections in the preservation process, and hope you enjoy this valuable book.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
2940025444138
Publisher:
Lea and Blanchard
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
0 MB

Read an Excerpt


CHAPTER II. t CANE-SUGAR.—ITS PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL PROPERTIES. ACTIONS OF RE-AGENTS ON. MOLASSES. TREACLE. The substance, the nature, and properties of which it is our purpose to investigate in the present chapter, is the one denominated by chemists cane-sugar, or crystallisable sugar. It is the ordinary sugar of commerce. The presence of this non-azotized proximate principle is not confined to the sugar-cane, as the name usually given to it would indicate, although it was from this source alone that Europe was supplied with it for many ages; but it is likewise found in the stalks of many grasses, particularly in those of the rnaize and guinea-corn, in the roots of the carrot, beet, andc., in pumpkins and melons, in the sap of the palm, and in most of the tropical fruit, from all of which, and also from other sources, it has been obtained by the chemist; but the sugar-cane, the Silesian beet-root, the sugar-maple, and the palm, are the only plants resorted to for this purpose by the manufacturer. From whatever plant it may have been obtained, cane-sugar, when separated from its accompanying impurities, by a process of refining, is physically and chemically identical. Although, when in that stateof admixture with other foreign substances that constitutes what is called moist or muscovado sugar, its origin is readily recognised. Cane-sugar, when pure, is solid, transparent, and colourless. It crystallises from its watery solution in oblique rhomboidal prisms'; but if to the solution certain foreign matters be added, as alcohol for instance, the form of the crystals is very much modified. When bruised in the dark, it is seen to possess phosphorescent properties, and becomesluminous. It is soluble in one-half of its weight of water at the temperature of 60, and ...

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