The Sun Girl and the Moon Boy: A Korean Folktale

The Sun Girl and the Moon Boy: A Korean Folktale

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by Yangsook Choi
     
 

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"A long time ago in Korea, there was not enough light.It was before the sun and the moon had been created." So begins one of the most treasured folktales of Korea. Reminiscent of Little Red Riding Hood, this ancient tale reveals how a hungry tiger tries to trick a young boy and girl into thinking that he is their mother. But their sharp wits and a

Overview

"A long time ago in Korea, there was not enough light.It was before the sun and the moon had been created." So begins one of the most treasured folktales of Korea. Reminiscent of Little Red Riding Hood, this ancient tale reveals how a hungry tiger tries to trick a young boy and girl into thinking that he is their mother. But their sharp wits and a measure of good luck are enough to save the children and reunite them with their mother, high above in the sky. Together, they bring the first rays of sunlight and moonlight to the world below. Having heard this story told many times by her grandmother, Yangsook Choi now brings her own voice and breathtaking oil paintings to The Sun Girl and the Moon Boy. With them, she shares an important part of her childhood and the Korean tradition.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Joyce Rice
This is a Korean folktale about a little boy and his sister and their ability to outwit a tiger. As in many fairy tales, it is reminiscent of early versions of Red Riding Hood and Hansel and Gretel. The author has drawn on the memories of her own grandmother's tellings and has presented the story through strikingly dark, sinister pictures, thus enhancing the feeling of mystery. Teachers of literature and social studies should take note of this tale and include it in their curriculums. Parents will be able to use this story to remind children of how special they are, and how resourceful they can be. Media specialists will want to purchase several copies of this book, because it's an excellent addition to both multicultural and folktale collections and it's not going to stay on the shelf.
School Library Journal - School Library Journal
Gr 1-4In this Korean folktale, a mother goes off to market, leaving her two children alone with strict instructions not to open the door to strangers. On her way back, she has a fatal encounter with a tiger, who then takes her clothes and tries to trick the children into letting him into the house. Readers familiar with the Grimms' story, "The Wolf and the Seven Little Kids," or Ed Young's Lon Po Po (Philomel, 1989) will know what happens next. This version, however, ends on a mythic note. A rope comes down from the sky to lift the children up from the tree where the tiger has chased them. Their mother waits high in the heavens; she changes into the stars, her daughter becomes the sun, and her son, the moon. Choi illustrates her story with rich, glowing oil paintings. Her cinematic use of shifting angles and focused close-ups is particularly effective as the tiger chases the children. Though oversized and menacing, he has his moments of humor, struggling to put on the clothes of the woman he has just eaten, or staring in puzzlement at the children's reflection at the bottom of a well. In an author's note, Choi says she heard the story "many times" in Korea, and adds that it is one of the best-loved folktales of that country, but gives no other source. A creation myth told as the adventures of innocents pursued, with dramatic illustrations.Margaret A. Chang, North Adams State College, MA

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780679883869
Publisher:
Random House Children's Books
Publication date:
10/15/1997
Edition description:
1 ED
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
8.88(w) x 11.33(h) x 0.42(d)
Age Range:
5 - 8 Years

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The Sun Girl and the Moon Boy 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
this is a fantastic book to read for religous people. it is a very good book to read for all ages. i recomend this book to all readers.