The Supreme Macaroni Company (Valentine Trilogy #3)

( 42 )

Overview

For over a hundred years, the Angelini Shoe Company in Greenwich Village has relied on the leather produced by Vechiarelli & Son in Tuscany. This historic business partnership provides the twist of fate for Valentine Roncalli, the school-teacher turned shoemaker, to fall in love with Gianluca Vechiarelli, a tanner with a complex past . . . and a secret.

A piece of surprising news is revealed on a fateful Christmas Eve when Valentine and Gianluca join her extended family. Now...

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The Supreme Macaroni Company (Valentine Trilogy #3)

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Overview

For over a hundred years, the Angelini Shoe Company in Greenwich Village has relied on the leather produced by Vechiarelli & Son in Tuscany. This historic business partnership provides the twist of fate for Valentine Roncalli, the school-teacher turned shoemaker, to fall in love with Gianluca Vechiarelli, a tanner with a complex past . . . and a secret.

A piece of surprising news is revealed on a fateful Christmas Eve when Valentine and Gianluca join her extended family. Now faced with life altering choices, Valentine remembers the wise words that inspired her in the early days of her beloved Angelini Shoe Company: "A person who can build a pair of shoes can do just about anything." The proud, passionate Valentine is going to fight for everything she wants and savor all she deserves—the bitter and the sweetness of life itself.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
09/09/2013
Trigiani (The Shoemaker’s Wife) explores the delicate balance (and unbalance) between work, family, and love. Valentine Roncalli, a shoemaker at her family’s business, Angelini Shoe Company, is going to marry her tanner, Gianluca Vechiarelli. Gianluca wants to return to his native Italy; Valentine is committed to keeping the family concern running in Greenwich Village. Further complicating things is a difficult moment between Valentine and an old friend, which threatens the marriage. The way the couple juggle their jobs and their complicated families with understanding, sympathy, and love is often hilarious, in spite of the frustration it brings to both of them. A twist near the end of the book is not unexpected, but tense shifts get a little dizzying and it’s easy to get ahead of the story. The pages detailing how Valentine practices her craft of shoemaking are superb. Trigiani’s ability to bring the large, warm, enveloping—if somewhat dysfunctional—family to life will keep any reader engrossed and entertained. (Nov.)
Library Journal
As with last year's The Shoemaker's Wife, the author's hottest seller to date, Trigiani picks up the cobbler's toolkit to craft a story about love and work that ranges from New York to Italy and beyond. As Valentine Roncalli seeks to maintain the 100-year-old family business—the Greenwich Village-based Angelini Shoe Company—she complicates her life by falling in love with Gianluca Vechiarelli, a tanner whose secrets start to emerge on Christmas Eve as the couple celebrate the Feast of the Seven Fishes with Valentine's family. With a one-day laydown on November 5 (news on this book just arrived), a ten-city tour, and a 150,000-copy first printing; pushed at BookExpo America.
Kirkus Reviews
2013-09-15
The third in a trilogy about the life of Valentine Roncalli. Trigiani (The Shoemaker's Wife, 2012, etc.) re-enters familiar territory here, both in that this book follows two previous novels about the Roncalli family and in that it has many of her hallmarks: sprawling Italian families, old-world craftsmanship, and melodious love letters to New York City and Italy. Narrator Valentine Roncalli is (as she frequently declares) an artist, designing shoes for a small, family-owned and -run shoe company. As the novel begins, she is being proposed to by Gianluca Vechiarelli, an Italian purveyor of fine leathers 18 years her senior. Readers are told immediately of several possible conflicts in this marriage, outside of the age difference: Both characters have layered romantic pasts; neither are sure how Gianluca will fit in with the shoe business; and he'd prefer to live in Italy. These issues mostly simmer in the background as the book plods through the next few years of their life together. The beginning is largely devoted to the lavish wedding Valentine's family plans for them. Then it's back to the shoe business, a lovely trip to Tuscany and the birth of a daughter. The simmering issues come to a boil at intervals throughout but rarely spur character change. While the narration is exposition-heavy, readers unfamiliar with the first two Valentine books may have trouble fitting the pieces together. Fans of Trigiani's Valentine books will find plenty of fodder here.
People
“New York ambition clashes with dolce vita ease in Trigiani’s delicious latest. . . . Feisty and poignant . . . Readers will root for Valentine and the lessons she learns--which apply equally to designing elegant shoes and to crafting a rewarding life.”
People
“New York ambition clashes with dolce vita ease in Trigiani’s delicious latest. . . . Feisty and poignant . . . Readers will root for Valentine and the lessons she learns—which apply equally to designing elegant shoes and to crafting a rewarding life.”
Library Journal
10/01/2013
Trigiani's latest (after The Shoemaker's Wife) introduces readers to Val Roncalli, shoemaker and member of a boisterously loud Italian American family that always keeps things interesting. Fiercely independent and set in her ways, Val shocks everyone on Christmas Eve, during a routine family fight, when she announces that Gianluca Vechiarelli, a tanner, has proposed to her. More shocking is that Val has accepted. The two are married quickly, plunging Val into a lifestyle so alien she nearly demands a divorce. Slowly, she comes to accept her new life and the meaning of love and marriage. VERDICT Val's eccentric family keeps the book going at a quick pace, distracting readers from Val's insecure baby steps toward marital bliss. Recommended for all Trigiani fans and those who've enjoyed a good cookie table (an Italian tradition commonly seen at weddings in Pennsylvania, Ohio, and West Virginia). [See Prepub Alert, 6/3/13.]—Mara Dabrishus, Ursuline Coll. Lib., Pepper Pike, OH
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780062136589
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
  • Publication date: 11/26/2013
  • Series: Valentine Trilogy Series , #3
  • Pages: 352
  • Sales rank: 133,513
  • Product dimensions: 6.20 (w) x 9.20 (h) x 1.20 (d)

Meet the Author

Adriana Trigiani

Adriana Trigiani is an award-winning playwright, television writer, and documentary filmmaker. Her books include the New York Times bestseller The Shoemaker's Wife; the Big Stone Gap series; Very Valentine; Brava, Valentine; Lucia, Lucia; and the bestselling memoir Don't Sing at the Table, as well as the young adult novels Viola in Reel Life and Viola in the Spotlight. She wrote the screenplay for Big Stone Gap, which she also directed. She lives in New York City with her husband and daughter.

Biography

As her squadrons of fans already know, Adriana Trigiani grew up in Big Stone Gap, a coal-mining town in southwest Virginia that became the setting for her first three novels. The Big Stone Gap books feature Southern storytelling with a twist: a heroine of Italian descent, like Trigiani, who attended St. Mary's College of Notre Dame, like Trigiani. But the series isn't autobiographical -- the narrator, Ave Maria Mulligan, is a generation older than Trigiani and, as the first book opens, has settled into small-town spinsterhood as the local pharmacist.

The author, by contrast, has lived most of her adult life in New York City. After graduating from college with a theater degree, she moved to the city and began writing and directing plays (her day jobs included cook, nanny, house cleaner and office temp). In 1988, she was tapped to write for the Cosby Show spinoff A Different World, and spent the following decade working in television and film. When she presented her friend and agent Suzanne Gluck with a screenplay about Big Stone Gap, Gluck suggested she turn it into a novel.

The result was an instant bestseller that won praise from fellow writers along with kudos from celebrities (Whoopi Goldberg is a fan). It was followed by Big Cherry Holler and Milk Glass Moon, which chronicle the further adventures of Ave Maria through marriage and motherhood. People magazine called them "Delightfully quirky... chock full of engaging, oddball characters and unexpected plot twists."

Critics sometimes reach for food imagery to describe Trigiani's books, which have been called "mouthwatering as fried chicken and biscuits" (USA Today) and "comforting as a mug of tea on a rainy Sunday" (The New York Times Book Review). Food and cooking play a big role in the lives of Trigiani's heroines and their families: Lucia, Lucia, about a seamstress in Greenwich Village in the 1950s, and The Queen of the Big Time, set in an Italian-American community in Pennsylvania, both feature recipes from Trigiani's grandmothers. She and her sisters have even co-written a cookbook called, appropriately enough, Cooking With My Sisters: One Hundred Years of Family Recipes, from Bari to Big Stone Gap. It's peppered with anecdotes, photos and family history. What it doesn't have: low-carb recipes. "An Italian girl can only go so long without pasta," Trigiani quipped in an interview on GoTriCities.com.

Her heroines are also ardent readers, so it comes as no surprise that book groups love Adriana Trigiani. And she loves them right back. She's chatted with scores of them on the phone, and her Web site includes photos of women gathered together in living rooms and restaurants across the country, waving Italian flags and copies of Lucia, Lucia.

Trigiani, a disciplined writer whose schedule for writing her first novel included stints from 3 a.m. to 8 a.m. each morning, is determined not to disappoint her fans. So far, she's produced a new novel each year since the publication of Big Stone Gap.

"I don't take any of it for granted, not for one second, because I know how hard this is to catch with your public," she said in an interview with The Independent. "I don't look at my public as a group; I look at them like individuals, so if a reader writes and says, 'I don't like this,' or, 'This bit stinks,' I take it to heart."

Good To Know

Some fascinating, funny outtakes from our interview with Trigiani:

"I appeared on the game show Kiddie Kollege on WCYB-TV in Bristol, Virginia, when I was in the third grade. I missed every question. It was humiliating."

"I have held the following jobs: office temp, ticket seller in movie theatre, cook in restaurant, nanny, and phone installer at the Super Bowl in New Orleans. In the writing world, I have been a playwright, television writer/producer, documentary writer/director, and now novelist."

"I love rhinestones, faux jewelry. I bought a pair of pearl studded clip on earrings from a blanket on the street when I first moved to New York for a dollar. They turned out to be a pair designed by Elsa Schiaparelli. Now, they are costume, but they are still Schiaps! Always shop in the street -- treasures aplenty."

"Dear readers, I like you. I am so grateful that you read and enjoy my books. I never forget that -- or you -- when I am working. I am also indebted to the booksellers who read the advanced reader's editions and write to me and say, "I'm gonna hand-sell this one." That always makes me jump for joy. I love the people at my publishing house. Smart. Funny, and I like it when they're slightly nervous because that means they care. The people I have met since I started writing books have been amazing on every level -- and why not? You're readers. And for someone to take reading seriously means that you are seeking knowledge. Yes, reading is fun, but it is also an indication of a serious-minded person who values imagination and ideas and, dare I say it, art. I never thought in a million years when I was growing up in Big Stone Gap that I would be writing this to you today. Books have always been sacred to me -- important, critical, fundamental -- and a celebration of language and words. And authors! When I was little, I didn't play Old Maid, I played authors. They had cards with the famous authors on them. Now, granted, they didn't look like movie stars, but I loved what they wrote and had to say. I can boil this all down to one thing: I love to tell stories -- and I love to hear them. I didn't think there was a job in the world where I would get to do both, and now thank God, I've found it."

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3.5
( 42 )
Rating Distribution

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(18)

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(6)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 42 Customer Reviews
  • Posted November 26, 2013

    more from this reviewer

    Although you may not know it from the title, The Supreme Macaron

    Although you may not know it from the title, The Supreme Macaroni Company by Adriana Trigiani is the third book in the saga of Valentine Roncalli, following Brava, Valentine and Very Valentine. We pick up our story on Christmas Eve as Valentine and her fiance Gianluca are headed to Christmas Eve with the raucous Roncalli family.
    My favorite scene in all three books has been the family holiday dinner scene; it doesn't matter if it is Thanksgiving or Christmas Eve, these scenes are pure joy. Trigiani makes the reader feel like she is a guest, and you'll want to pull up a chair for this party.
    There is Aunt Feen, who says everything that is on her mind, and that is not a good thing. When Valentine's father Dutch gets nervous, he confuses words to everyone's embarrassment. Her brother Charlie just lost his job and is getting roaring drunk. And just as Valentine has second thoughts about subjecting Gianluca to this,"On cue, as dramatized in the biblical epics, the Israelites came pouring from out of the living room as they did during the parting of the Red Sea. In this sweet, small house, they appeared like a cast of thousands, except that unlike the people of peace, my family was arguing. They shouted. They shoved. They threw their hands in the air. "Valentine is trying to have it all, but as most of us know, that is impossible to do all at the same time. Angelini Shoe Company, her shoe design and manufacturing business, is going great guns, until her cousin who owns the manufacturing plant in Argentina that makes her shoes decides to close her plant.
    And so Valentine has to find another manufacturer, not an easy task for her labor intensive shoe creations. Thus the title of the book comes into play. The Supreme Macaroni Company is an old closed plant in the midwest that could possibly be the answer for Angelini Shoes, and I particularly enjoyed this part of the novel.
    Trigiani gives the reader a look at the challenges facing small business owners, the backbone of our American economy, and I liked that her family is so involved in saving the business begun by her grandfather.
    And Valentine has to balance work with family life. Gianluca left his family back in Italy to move to New York with his fiancee. He sacrificed much to make his wife happy, and is seems as if Valentine is not appreciative of this.
    The author laces this novel with her trademark humor, though the reader senses something tragic lay ahead. Soon Valentine has to dig deep within herself, and allow herself to rely on those surrounding her, to make it through.
    Reading Trigiani's novels is like catching up with a good friend, and I always look forward to a new novel from her. Her characters are interesting and have a sense of reality about them; they could be your friends or family. (Who wouldn't want a best friend like Gabriel?)
    These novels are a treat for all of your senses. You can see the beautiful shoes she designs in your mind's eye, and smell the delicious food being prepared for Christmas Eve. They are screaming out to be put up on the big (or little) screen.
    I also must mention the cover of this book. Trigiani's last novel, The Shoemaker's Wife, featured a gorgeous book cover and The Supreme Macaroni Company follows in that vein with a beautifully rich cover. What is on the outside more than matches the inside of this lovely novel that will touch your heart. This is a book to give your sister, sister-in-law or girlfriend this holiday season.

    8 out of 11 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 4, 2013

    Very Disappointed !!!!

    I was looking forward to this 3rd book in the Valentine Trilogy, but was so disappointed. I have enjoyed many of Adriana's books, especially the Valentine series and The Shoemaker's Wife. This book was TERRIBLE. The story was not good, there a errors in the text [such as locations and relations]. After waiting so long for this to come out, it was a complete let down.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 17, 2013

    Great story.  

    Great story.  

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 14, 2013

    Loved it

    I don,t understand the ones that were disapointed this is a wonderful continuation of valentines and gianluca story, read it you will NOT be disapointed!!

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 6, 2013

    So dissappointing

    Loved the previous books... she called this one in. Poor character development, unimaginative story.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 5, 2013

    Extremely disappointing

    I have loved all of Trigiani's previous books, but this one was horrible. Very poorly written, seemed like a rush job. Did she really write this? Waste of time and money.

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 4, 2014

    You would not think the same person had even written this terrib

    You would not think the same person had even written this terrible third Valentine book. All of her other novels have been terrific reads and tell coherent., heartwarming stories that capture your interest until the end. Supreme Macaroni begins with a disjointed series of conversations among characters instead of actual prose that is confusing if you can't remember which characters are who. This book was written too far past the other two, and the content and presentation make it irrelevant to the series. I hope this is not the direction this author will be taking in the future, or I won't be reading any more of her work.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted December 21, 2013

    I waited for this one, kept on reading it just because, she repe

    I waited for this one, kept on reading it just because, she repeated everything so much it got boring.
    Valentine came across for me as selfish only few parts of the book I found enjoyable, ending was 
    sad and predicable. I was so disappointed

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted December 11, 2013

    Check out the full review at Kritters Ramblings The third book

    Check out the full review at Kritters Ramblings

    The third book finds Valentine, newly engaged as it starts just moments after the second book ended.  She gets married and then must start living as a married woman when she has spent many many years single.  I loved the juggling act of family, career and lifestyle and trying to please each part of her life all at the same time - it is such a theme that many women now have to deal with and the juxtaposition of her Italian husband who has a different view of what a woman's role should be.

    A complete twist at the end took this book to a completely different level than the last two and really made me feel the closure of the trilogy.  I can't believe Trigiani went there but when I finished reading the book, I was glad she did!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted November 27, 2013

    more from this reviewer

    I received this book from TLC Book Tours in exchange for a fair

    I received this book from TLC Book Tours in exchange for a fair and honest review.

    I'm a big fan of Adriana Trigiani's novels and have been reading them for years.  They're light and usually focus on family in some aspect, with a big of a not-too-wimpy love story thrown in.  They also focus on a strong female character.

    The Supreme Macaroni Company by Adriana Trigiani is no exception.  Valentine is a shoemaker, a fabulous designer, who has fallen in love with Gianluca, a tanner.  This is a modern story, focusing on Valentine's romance with Gianluca, with the lesson that everything worth having isn't always easy.  In addition, The Supreme Macaroni Company describes the process of expanding Valentine's shoe empire.

    Whether you are a long-time fan of Adriana Trigiani or brand new to her novels, The Supreme Macaroni Company is worth the read.

    What are you favorite types of shoes to wear?

    Thanks for reading, 

    Rebecca @ Love at First Book

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 16, 2014

    Greatest author

    All of Adriana's books are wonderful.
    Just finished Supreme Macaroni Co.
    One of her best. I laughed so much and then cried.
    We love her and can't wait for her next book.
    SHE IS THE GREATEST!!!!!!!

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  • Posted August 14, 2014

    more from this reviewer

    This novel began with much humor. I loved the "dry" sa

    This novel began with much humor. I loved the "dry" sarcasm, and the pathetic descriptions of  her
    Italian/American life. It was a truly enjoyable romantic comedy, but all too quickly dissipated. Valentine
     was very successful, talented, somewhat insecure, and spoiled. Gianluca was very mature, classy,
    stable, and wise.  Valentine was totally self-centered and was determined marriage would not change
    anything in her life...she just would no longer be alone nor expected to drop everything to assist
    another family member.

    This was an engaging, yet circumventing story with romance, compromise,  adversity, family tradition
    and ties. It often provoked conflicting emotions.

    The three problems I had with this book was #1. The humor was not maintained in Valentine's
    personality. It seems the girl at the beginning of the story is very different from the one through the rest
    of the book...I( know...she may be bi-polar). #2. The profanity and some crude language did not fit the
    proper Italian scene nor was it appreciated by this reader. #3 The ending died down to  detached from
    the story and the title. It did nothing to vindicate the title as a good pick for the story line.

    It still merited a weak Four Stars rating.

    *I was gifted this book for an honest review, of which I have given.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 5, 2014

    Dating company

    Males go to res 2, Females go to res 3

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 11, 2014

    I absolutely loved this book, as I have all of her others.  Adri

    I absolutely loved this book, as I have all of her others.  Adriana Trigiani is a gifted writer and I anxiously await more from her.  I loved her characters.  They were so believable and so human.  It made me want to belong to a family like  Valentine's.  I read the Big Stone Gap series and thought It was the best until I read the Valentine Trilogy and then I liked it more.  The only disappointing thing about The Supreme Macaroni Company was that it ended!  More please! 

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  • Posted April 11, 2014

    I waited and waited for the conclusion for THIS?!

    I thoroughly enjoyed the first book, sort of wondered about the second, but still enjoyed it (except I could see the writing on the wall w/the "long distance something(one) has to give" relationship, but I never expected to feel like it had been "phoned in" with the conclusion, nor to feel from the first page as if doom was only a page away with each and every sentence. Long before I got to the (unfortunately long expected) end, I knew the "end" and it just wasn't creative or satisfying - this didn't ever feel "real" or "truthful", two words I would have previously always associated with Ms. Trigiani's writing. I almost wished the third book had never been written - I could have happily kept wondering "what...".

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  • Posted February 28, 2014

    Love this book...

    I've only recently discovered Adriana Trigiani. First read The Shoemaker's Wife (great), then Very Valentine (also great), then Supreme Macaroni which is more about Valentine, a wonderful, lovable character. Trigiani's stories are deep, well-written, funny and addicting. I hate getting to the end of the book. Loved this book and her others and would recommend to anyone who loves to read.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 3, 2014

    So heartbreakingly real

    If you have read any of the author's previous books, you know her charactors are challenged with life issues.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 2, 2014

    I want my time and $11.99 back please!

    Having read and really enjoyed Trigliani's previous works, I was sorely disappointed in the plot, characters and overall quality of writing. We all get that Valentine loves to make shoes and is willing to ostrasize all the people who love her in order to realize that dream, but I can't believe how disjointed and rambling this story was. I felt like (SPOILER ALERT!!!!!) killing off the best character in the book was a desperate ploy to engage the reader emotionally to the story. If you are looking for a happy ending, read a Susanna Kearsley book instead.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 26, 2014

    Highly Recommended---Most enjoyable

    Love the author's style and topic---family!! Have read several books by Adriana and plan on reading them all.

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  • Posted January 24, 2014

    Highly recommended.

    This writer takes an Italian-American on a nolstalgia trip with a surprise ending. Couldn't put it down.

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