The Swamp Where Gator Hides

The Swamp Where Gator Hides

5.0 1
by Marianne Berkes, Roberta Baird
     
 

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Editorial Reviews

Kirkus Reviews
2014-01-15
This exploration of the creatures of the Florida Everglades is delivered in a familiar, cumulative House-that-Jack-Built style. The swamp scene begins with a simple bit of algae and expands bit by bit as the clever verse grows to include a bobcat, a vole, an egret up high in a nest, a grazing deer, a rumbling bullfrog and a "snake / who slithers around / past the turtle / taking a snooze / ignoring the duck / who paddles in ooze / under the algae / that carpets the swamp / where gator hides." Gator finally reveals himself as he makes a grab for a sunfish, who scoots away just in time. Poor Gator. "Who will he have for lunch today?" The realistic illustrations have a stiff and somewhat amateurish quality, but they are appealing nonetheless, featuring deep greens and browns with accents of blue and purple. Children will enjoy spotting the alligator hiding in each page spread and learning more about the swamp and its inhabitants through the notes that follow the story. A pleasing introduction to the swamp appropriate for individual exploration or sharing with a group or class. (author's & illustrator's notes, further resources) (Picture book. 3-8)
Children's Literature - Ken Marantz and Sylvia Marantz
In cumulative verse similar to that of The House that Jack Built, Berkes takes us into the swamp where Gator hides to meet the many creatures that live there. We begin with the algae that carpets the swamp, move on to the duck “who paddles in ooze,” and the turtle who takes a snooze, “…ignoring the duck…” They are joined in turn by the snake, the frog, the deer, the egret, the vole, the bobcat, and the sunfish “who scoots away/ when Gator comes out/ to catch his prey.” Who will he have for lunch? Gator, who has been lurking in each double-page illustration, emerges at last. Baird visualizes the swamp with naturalistic creatures always on the lookout for Gator. Close-up images are mainly shown in shades of green and yellow, colors that convey the oozy swamp and contrast with the egret’s pure white feathers and the water lily’s petals. The stillness of the swamp builds the reader’s sense of danger. More information on the swamp and its inhabitants, plus added tips from both author and illustrator are included. Reviewer: Ken Marantz and Sylvia Marantz; Ages 4 to 8.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781584694700
Publisher:
Dawn Publications
Publication date:
03/01/2014
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
9.30(w) x 11.10(h) x 0.40(d)
Lexile:
AD680L (what's this?)
Age Range:
4 - 7 Years

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The Swamp Where Gator Hides 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
HomeSchoolBookReview More than 1 year ago
Have you ever been in a swamp? What kind of wildlife lives in swamps? A swamp is a unique kind of half-land, half-water wetland habitat. The swamp in The Swamp Where Gator Hides is the Florida Everglades, where the warm, wet, subtropical climate provides ideal conditions for not only alligators, but also dabbling ducks, red bellied turtles, cottonmouth snakes, bullfrogs, white deer, great egrets, voles, bobcats, and sunfish. Which one will the camouflaged gator that hides under the carpet of algae in the swamp get to eat—if any? This rhyming text by Marianne Berkes, which follows the cumulative pattern of “The House that Jack Built,” and the colorful, convincing illustrations by Roberta Baird introduce young readers to the ecological environment of the swamp. A section at the end has a page of further explanation about the world of the swamp in general and a couple of pages with more information on the various animals mentioned in the book, along with tips for fun learning activities from both the author and the illustrator. Kids will love searching for the hidden alligator in each double-page drawing as they learn about predator-prey relationships.