The Swiss Ball: Theory, Basic Exercises and Clinical Application

Overview

This is the first textbook which focuses on the Swiss ball and its wide range of clinical applications. The author demonstrates why the Swiss ball is useful for the treatment of patients in all areas of physical therapy, including gynecology and explains how to apply it in the outpatient clinic and the acute care setting, including intensive care units. The Swiss ball can be used to screen for deficits in strength, mobility, balance and coordination, and for manual therapy. Trained therapists are shown ways of ...

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Paperback (1998)
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Overview

This is the first textbook which focuses on the Swiss ball and its wide range of clinical applications. The author demonstrates why the Swiss ball is useful for the treatment of patients in all areas of physical therapy, including gynecology and explains how to apply it in the outpatient clinic and the acute care setting, including intensive care units. The Swiss ball can be used to screen for deficits in strength, mobility, balance and coordination, and for manual therapy. Trained therapists are shown ways of using the ball to manage the weight of the patient's body, to assist the patient with active exercises, to evaluate and train balance, and to stimulate the sensorimotor system. Numerous photos of patients being treated help the reader visualize how Swiss ball exercises work in practice.

The book contains black-and-white illustrations.

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Editorial Reviews

Doody's Review Service
Reviewer: Deborah M. King, PTA, CPI (North Hills Orthopedic and Sports Physical Therapy)
Description: This book covers a wide range of rehabilitation protocols as well as an extensive review of neurological components with numerous examples and illustrations in each chapter. It contains a very detailed table of contents, glossary, and index as well as a large reference list at the end of each chapter.
Purpose: The purpose is to educate our profession on the variety of clinical applications utilizing the Swiss Ball and why incorporating it into many exercise programs proves beneficial for both the patient and therapist. This would be a useful resource for therapists when confronted with the atypical patient.
Audience: It is geared towards PTs and PTAs, but would be beneficial for OTs, students, and hospital and home health workers who may be primary care providers.
Features: This book has outlined objectives in each chapter. An abundance of photographs and illustrations to insure proper technique is provided. There is an extensive reference list and a review of pertinent terminology as needed as well as instructions on how to properly size and care for the ball.
Assessment: This book is a good overall reference because of the varied patient population it covers, though it lacks specificity in any one area. The expanse of clinical applications could be a good tool for students preparing for affiliations or for professionals to refer to when confronted with patients with unusual circumstances.
Deborah M. King
This book covers a wide range of rehabilitation protocols as well as an extensive review of neurological components with numerous examples and illustrations in each chapter. It contains a very detailed table of contents, glossary, and index as well as a large reference list at the end of each chapter. The purpose is to educate our profession on the variety of clinical applications utilizing the Swiss Ball and why incorporating it into many exercise programs proves beneficial for both the patient and therapist. This would be a useful resource for therapists when confronted with the atypical patient. It is geared towards PTs and PTAs, but would be beneficial for OTs, students, and hospital and home health workers who may be primary care providers. This book has outlined objectives in each chapter. An abundance of photographs and illustrations to insure proper technique is provided. There is an extensive reference list and a review of pertinent terminology as needed as well as instructions on how to properly size and care for the ball. This book is a good overall reference because of the varied patient population it covers, though it lacks specificity in any one area. The expanse of clinical applications could be a good tool for students preparing for affiliations or for professionals to refer to when confronted with patients with unusual circumstances.

3 Stars from Doody
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9783540611448
  • Publisher: Springer Berlin Heidelberg
  • Publication date: 11/28/2000
  • Edition description: 1998
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 409
  • Product dimensions: 0.84 (w) x 6.14 (h) x 9.21 (d)

Table of Contents

1 History of the Swiss Ball.- 1.1 Introduction.- 1.2 History of Literature on the Swiss Ball.- References.- 2 Neuroanatomical, Neurophysiological, and Physiological Bases: A Hypothesis.- 2.1 Brain Stem and Reticular Formation.- 2.2 Cerebellum.- 2.3 Vestibular System.- 2.3.1 Vestibular Nuclei.- 2.3.2 Visual and Auditory Tracts.- 2.4 Hypothalamus.- 2.5 Thalamus.- 2.6 Basal Ganglia.- 2.7 Autonomic Nervous System.- 2.8 Limbic System.- 2.9 Sensorimotor System.- 2.10 Physiological Responses.- 2.10.1 Valsalva Maneuver.- References.- 3 Motor Learning.- 3.1 Stages of Learning.- 3.2 Knowledge of Result, Knowledge of Performance.- 3.3 Feedback.- 3.4 Clinical Applications: Examples.- 3.5 Plasticity of the Brain.- References.- 4 Practical Considerations.- 4.1 Ball Conditions.- 4.1.1 Exercise Surface.- 4.1.2 Cleaning the Ball.- 4.1.3 Pressure in the Ball.- 4.1.4 Size of the Ball.- 4.2 Safety Conditions.- 4.3 Precautions, Contraindications.- References.- 5 Points of Observation.- 5.1 Ball-Floor.- 5.2 Ball-Body.- 5.3 Body-Floor.- 5.4 Base of Support.- 5.5 Bisecting Plane.- 5.6 Body Distances.- 5.7 Hinged Joints.- 5.8 Continuing Movement and Buttressing.- References.- 6 Exercise Terminology and Muscle Activity.- 6.1 Exercise Terminology.- 6.1.1 Body Segments.- 6.1.2 Potential Mobility.- 6.1.3 Dynamic Stabilization.- 6.2 Variations of Muscle Activity.- 6.2.1 Parking Function.- 6.2.2 Supporting Function.- 6.2.3 Free-Play Function.- 6.2.4 Bridging Activity.- 6.2.5 Hanging Activity.- 6.3 Primary Movement, Actio-Reactio.- 6.4 Conditio-Limitatio.- References.- 7 Planning of Exercises, Screening, Evaluation, and Treatment.- 7.1 Evaluation.- 7.2 Muscle Strength and Range of Motion.- 7.2.1 Hip Extensor and Flexor Muscles: Testing Strength in Side-Lying Position.- 7.2.2 Hip Extensor Muscles: Testing Strength in Supine Position.- 7.2.3 Hip Extensor Muscles: Testing Strength in Prone Position.- 7.2.4 Hip Abductor and Adductor Muscles: Testing Strength in Supine Position.- 7.2.5 Hip Abductor and Adductor Muscles: Testing Strength in Side-Lying Position.- 7.2.6 Combination of Movements in Several Planes.- 7.3 Back Extensor and Trapezius Muscles: Testing Strength.- 7.4 Triceps Brachii Muscle: Testing Strength.- 7.5 Abdominal Muscles and Hip Flexor Muscles (Iliopsoas): Testing Strength in Sitting Position.- 7.5.1 Abdominal Muscles and Hip Flexor Muscles: Testing Strength in Supine Position.- 7.5.2 Combination of Strengthening Abdominal and Hamstring Muscles.- 7.5.3 Abdominal Muscles: Testing/Strengthening in Prone Position.- 7.6 Evaluating Alignment.- 7.6.1 Supine Position with the Swiss Ball Under One Leg ..- 7.6.2 Common Patterns of Deviation from Normal Alignment of Femur, Lower Leg, and Foot.- 7.6.3 Sitting on a Bench/Chair and with the Swiss Ball Placed Under the Feet.- 7.6.4 Sitting on the Swiss Ball.- 7.6.5 Sitting on the Swiss Ball and Taking Steps Until Reaching Supine Position on the Swiss Ball.- 7.7 Evaluating Quality of Movement and Dissociation of the Lower Extremities.- 7.7.1 Supine Position, Both Legs on the Swiss Ball.- 7.7.2 Supine Position, One Leg Resting on the Swiss Ball ..- 7.7.3 Supine Position with Alternate Leg Movements.- 7.7.4 Prone Position Over the Swiss Ball.- 7.8 Testing Balance.- 7.8.1 Balance Deficits.- 7.8.2 Screening Balance.- 7.9 Identifying Neurotension Problems and Treatment.- 7.9.1 Prone Position over the Swiss Ball.- 7.9.2 Supine Position over the Swiss Ball.- 7.9.3 Supine with the Legs on the Swiss Ball.- References.- 8 Assistive Devices.- 8.1 Sitfit and Swiss Ball.- 8.2 Foam Roll and Swiss Ball.- 8.3 Swiss Ball and Thera-Band.- 8.4 Swiss Ball and Dumbbells.- 8.5 Swiss Ball as an Assistive Device in Manual Therapy.- References.- 9 Exercise Descriptions.- 9.1 “Cowboy”.- 9.2 “Scale”.- 9.3 “Indian Fakir”.- 9.4 “Donkey Stretch Yourself”.- 9.5 “Stretch Myself”.- 9.6 “Sea Gull”.- 9.7 “Hula-Hula, Forward/Backward”.- 9.8 “Hula-Hula, Side to Side”.- 9.9 “Salamander”.- 9.10 “Swing”.- 9.11 “Duck”.- 9.12 “Crab”.- 9.13 “Trot”.- 9.14 “Sea Urchin”.- 9.15 “Goldfish”.- 9.16 “Walking on Hands”.- 9.17 “Push Me-Pull Me”.- 9.18 “Figurehead”.- 9.19 “Scissors”.- 9.20 “Mermaid”.- 9.21 “Carrousel”.- 9.22 “Perpetual Motion”.- 9.23 “Pendulum”.- 9.24 “Rock’n Roll”.- 9.25 “Move My Leg”.- 9.26 “Easter Bunny”.- 9.27 “Well Figure”.- 9.28 “Cocktail Party”.- 9.29 “Dolphin”.- 9.30 Summary of Exercises.- References.- 10 Intensive and Acute Care.- 10.1 Introduction.- 10.2 Applications.- 10.3 Selection of Patients.- 10.3.1 Neurology.- 10.3.2 Cardiology.- 10.3.3 Medical/Surgical.- References.- 11 Orthopedic and Sports Medicine.- 11.1 Introduction.- 11.2 After ACL Reconstruction.- 11.2.1 1-3 Weeks After ACL Reconstruction.- 11.2.2 3 Weeks After ACL Reconstruction.- 11.2.3 More than 5 Weeks After ACL Reconstruction.- 11.2.4 Adaptation of Exercises.- 11.3 After Shoulder Injuries and Surgeries.- 11.3.1 Introduction.- 11.3.2 Acute Nonsurgical Shoulder Injury.- 11.3.3 The “Frozen” Shoulder (Adhesive Capsulitis).- 11.3.4 After Surgical Repair of the Shoulder.- 11.3.5 Additional Exercises for the Shoulder.- 11.4 Posture.- 11.4.1 Introduction.- 11.4.2 Postural Deficits.- 11.5 Dysfunctions of the Back.- 11.5.1 Introduction.- 11.5.2 Treatment Goals.- 11.5.3 Treatment Examples.- 11.6 Scoliosis.- 11.6.1 Introduction.- 11.6.2 Treatment Goals and Approaches.- 11.6.3 Treatment Examples.- References.- 12 Medical/Surgical Outpatient Care.- 12.1 Surgical Patients.- 12.1.1 Introduction.- 12.1.2 Evaluation.- 12.1.3 Treatment Approach.- 12.1.4 Treatment Examples.- 12.2 Medical Patients.- 12.3 Osteoporosis.- 12.3.1 Introduction.- 12.3.2 Treatment Approach.- 12.3.3 Treatment Example.- 12.4 Ankylosing Spondylitis.- 12.4.1 Introduction.- 12.4.2 Treatment Approach.- 12.4.3 Physical Therapy.- 12.4.4 Swiss Ball Exercises in AS.- References.- 13 Neurological Outpatient Care.- 13.1 Introduction.- 13.2 Symptoms.- 13.2.1 Cerebellar Injuries.- 13.2.2 Parkinson’s Disease.- 13.2.3 Cerebral Vascular Accidents.- 13.2.4 Multiple Sclerosis.- 13.3 Restoration of Function.- 13.3.1 Plasticity of the Brain.- 13.3.2 Limbic System Function.- 13.3.3 Swiss Ball Application to Aid Recovery of Motor Function.- 13.4 Physical Therapy in Neurological Deficits.- 13.4.1 Evaluation.- 13.4.2 Treatment Approach.- 13.5 Physical Therapy in Parkinson’s Disease.- 13.5.1 Group Exercises.- 13.5.2 Treatment Approach.- 13.5.3 Exercise Examples.- 13.6 Physical Therapy After Cerebral Vascular Accidents.- 13.6.1 Evaluation.- 13.6.2 Treatment Approach.- 13.6.3 Exercise Examples.- 13.7 Physical Therapy in Multiple Sclerosis.- 13.7.1 Evaluation.- 13.7.2 Treatment Approach.- 13.7.3 Exercise Examples.- 13.8 Physical Therapy in Muscular Dystrophy.- 13.8.1 Introduction.- 13.8.2 Treatment Approach.- 13.9 Physical Therapy in Cerebral Palsy.- 13.9.1 Introduction.- 13.9.2 Treatment Approach.- 13.9.3 Exercise Examples.- References.- 14 Incontinence.- 14.1 Introduction.- 14.2 Tanzberger Concept for Functional Exercises of the Pelvic Floor.- 14.3 Anatomy of the Pelvic Floor.- 14.3.1 The Three Layers of the Pelvic Floor.- 14.3.2 Innervation of the Pelvic Floor Muscles.- 14.3.3 Muscle Physiology of the Pelvic Floor.- 14.4 The Pelvic Floor and its Functional Connections.- 14.4.1 Functions.- 14.4.2 Training Functional Connections of the Pelvic Floor to Thorax and Legs.- 14.5 Medical Conditions Which May Require Pelvic Floor Exercises.- 14.5.1 Gynecological Applications.- 14.5.2 Urological and Proctological Applications.- 14.6 Retraining the Pelvic Floor Muscles.- 14.6.1 Preconditions for Functional Exercise of the Invisible Pelvic Floor Muscles.- 14.6.2 Treatment Considerations for Sphincter Muscle Weakness.- 14.6.3 Treatment of Descending Diaphragm Pelvis with Gaping Urogenital Hiatus (Postpartum).- 14.6.4 Performance and Sequence of Exercises for Treatment of Incontinence.- 14.6.5 Effect of the Bouncing Movement.- 14.6.6 Observation of Movements During Pelvic Floor Exercises.- 14.6.7 Final Observation and Practical Results.- 14.7 Description of Swiss Ball Exercises.- 14.7.1 Exercises in the Sagittal Plane.- 14.7.2 Exercises in the Frontal Plane.- 14.7.3 Rocking/Bouncing Movements.- 14.8 Exercise Examples.- 14.8.1 “Roll-On”.- 14.8.2 “Right Stop-Left Stop”.- 14.8.3 “Sit Upright and Roll Toward the Wall”.- 14.8.4 “Lean Forward and Roll Toward the Wall”.- 14.8.5 “Draw a Urethra”.- 14.8.6 Variation with the Thera-Band.- 14.8.7 “Kick and Kick”.- References.- 15 Preventive Applications.- 15.1 Introduction.- 15.2 Evaluating Postural Alignment in Healthy Persons.- 15.3 Applications to Prevent Injury of the Musculoskeletal System.- 15.4 Treatment Examples.- 15.4.1 A Dental Hygienist.- 15.4.2 Musicians.- 15.4.3 Desk/Computer Workers.- 15.4.4 The Swiss Ball in Schools.- 15.4.5 Relief of Aches and Pains in Health Professionals.- References.

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