The Tale of Rabbit and Coyote

The Tale of Rabbit and Coyote

by Tony Johnston, Tomie dePaola
     
 

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A lively trickster tale rooted in the folklore of Mexico.

Poor Coyote! How'd he get bonked by a rock-hard fruit underneath the jicara tree? Who tricked him into whacking a wasps' nest with a stick? And why is he always howling at the moon? Because of Rabbit, that's why!  See more details below

Overview

A lively trickster tale rooted in the folklore of Mexico.

Poor Coyote! How'd he get bonked by a rock-hard fruit underneath the jicara tree? Who tricked him into whacking a wasps' nest with a stick? And why is he always howling at the moon? Because of Rabbit, that's why!

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"Humorous . . . This zesty collaboration is sure to be popular." —Booklist, starred review

"Johnston's adaptation of the action-packed tale is succinct and colorful; dePaola's deceptively childlike illustrations mark a breathtaking departure from his familiar style. . . A book that's sure to appeal." —Kirkus Reviews, pointer review

"An impressive collaboration. . . The artist outdoes himself in this fetching book." —Publishers Weekly

"An engaging retelling . . . Familiar and funny, yet different and distinctive." —School Library Journal

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
The folklore of Mexico inspires this impressive collaboration by the talented creators of The Badger and the Magic Fan and Pages of Music . After clever Rabbit sneaks into a field one evening and feasts on the biggest chiles, the farmer sets up a beeswax ``farmer'' to trap the thief. When this imposter refuses to talk the next night, Rabbit (not so cleverly) punches it repeatedly, until his paws and feet are stuck in the wax. Thrilled with his catch, the real farmer throws the rabbit in a sack and plans to cook him. But the wily lapin convinces Coyote to take his place: ``This man wants me to marry his daughter . . . but I'm too young. Why don't you take my place?'' It is the first of many ruses the gullible Coyote falls for--with uproarious results--throughout the tale, which ultimately explains why coyotes howl at the moon. Spanish expressions worked into the pictures are translated in a glossary. A good part of the humor of this pungent Zapotec legend is delivered through dePaola's droll folk art, resplendent with the bronzed and dazzling hues of the Southwest. Both the palette and the patterns used here represent a departure for the artist, who outdoes himself in this fetching book. Ages 4-8. (May)
Children's Literature - Children's Literature
This tale, from Oaxaca, Mexico will be hauntingly familiar to those acquainted with the B'rer Rabbit stories. Once again, the trickster is the rabbit and coyote is his foil. Poor coyote becomes so frustrated that he begins howling at the moon-in Mexico, it is a rabbit in the moon, not the man in the moon. The illustrations have a Southwest flair, and have some Spanish phrases within (there is a glossary at the back).
Children's Literature - Debra Briatico
This humorous folktale from Oaxaca, Mexico describes how Rabbit uses naughty deceptions and hijinks to outwit Coyote. In the story, Rabbit tricks Coyote into hanging upside down at the farmer's house and whacking a wasps nest with a stick. After the Rabbit causes so much trouble, he climbs to the moon for safety. Furious with the Rabbit's antics, the Coyote spends his nights howling at the moon. Simple illustrations featuring vibrant colors from the Southwest accompany this hilarious tale of trickery and deceit.
School Library Journal
K-Gr 4-An engaging retelling of an Oaxacan trickster/pourquoi tale that combines story elements from Brer Rabbit, the legend of Coyote swallowing the moon, and the rabbit in the moon. Rabbit's tricks escalate to a final comical episode in which he scampers up to the moon, hides the ladder, and leaves Coyote howling in frustration below. Creating a distinctly Mexican look, the book features bordered folk-art paintings positioned on a variety of vibrantly hued pages. dePaola uses colors freely, along with primitive design elements that include snippets of hand-lettered Spanish dialogue. (Readers who can't decipher their meaning can check the end of the story for translations and pronunciations). A picture-book folktale that is at once familiar and funny, yet different and distinctive.-Lee Bock, Brown County Public Libraries, Green Bay, WI

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780698116306
Publisher:
Penguin Young Readers Group
Publication date:
05/28/1998
Edition description:
REPRINT
Pages:
32
Sales rank:
1,116,833
Product dimensions:
8.50(w) x 10.00(h) x 0.19(d)
Lexile:
520L (what's this?)
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

What People are saying about this

From the Publisher
"Humorous . . . This zesty collaboration is sure to be popular." —Booklist, starred review

"Johnston's adaptation of the action-packed tale is succinct and colorful; dePaola's deceptively childlike illustrations mark a breathtaking departure from his familiar style. . . A book that's sure to appeal." —Kirkus Reviews, pointer review

"An impressive collaboration. . . The artist outdoes himself in this fetching book." —Publishers Weekly

"An engaging retelling . . . Familiar and funny, yet different and distinctive." —School Library Journal

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