The Talking Greeks: Speech, Animals, and the Other in Homer, Aeschylus, and Plato

The Talking Greeks: Speech, Animals, and the Other in Homer, Aeschylus, and Plato

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by John Heath
     
 

Explores how the ancient Greeks regarded the capacity of speech as the defining human characteristic.See more details below

Overview

Explores how the ancient Greeks regarded the capacity of speech as the defining human characteristic.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780521832649
Publisher:
Cambridge University Press
Publication date:
05/31/2005
Pages:
400
Product dimensions:
5.98(w) x 8.98(h) x 0.94(d)

Table of Contents

Introduction; Part I. Speech, Animals, and Human Status in Homer: 1. Bellowing like a bull: humans and other animals in Homer; 2. Controlling language: Telemachus learns to speak; 3. Talking through the heroic code: Achilles learns to tell tales; Part II. Listening for the Other in Classical Greece: 4. Making a difference: the silence of otherness; Part III. Speech, Animals, and Human Status in Classical Athens: 5. Disentangling the beast: humans and other animals in the Oresteia; 6. Socratic silence: the shame of the Athenians; Epilogue.

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