The Talking Leaves: An Indian Story (Illustrated)

The Talking Leaves: An Indian Story (Illustrated)

by William O. Stoddard
     
 

View All Available Formats & Editions

This is the story of a family who is captured by the Apaches. The mother is killed, the father, Steve, and daughter, Rita, are separated, with Steve being sold to the Lipan tribe, and Rita being brought up by the Apaches. Years later, Rita and her Apache friend find some magazines among the ruins of a wagon train. These are "The Talking Leaves." While adult Apaches

Overview

This is the story of a family who is captured by the Apaches. The mother is killed, the father, Steve, and daughter, Rita, are separated, with Steve being sold to the Lipan tribe, and Rita being brought up by the Apaches. Years later, Rita and her Apache friend find some magazines among the ruins of a wagon train. These are "The Talking Leaves." While adult Apaches are familiar with printed material, Rita begins remembering how to read English, which leads to her realization that she is not an Indian. As unlikely as it seems, will Steve and Rita be reunited?

Stoddard weaves in gold mines, claim jumpers, outlaws, and the U.S. Calvary.

This edition of the book contains the 26 original pen-and-ink drawings which have been carefully rejuvenated.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
2940015633788
Publisher:
New York: Harper & Brothers Publishers, 1882
Publication date:
09/26/2012
Series:
American Indian Classics , #6
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
16 MB
Note:
This product may take a few minutes to download.

Meet the Author

William Osborn Stoddard (Courtland County, 1835–1925) was an American author, inventor, and assistant secretary to Abraham Lincoln during his first term.

Stoddard was born at Homer, Courtland Co., New York. His parents were Prentice S. and Sarah (Osborn) Stoddard. Stoddard attended the University of Rochester, where he graduated cum laude. On 25 Jul 1870 Stoddard married Susan Eagleson Cooper; they had five children. Stoddard died in Madison, New Jersey.

Stoddard's father was a bookseller, and Stoddard worked in his bookshop while growning up. After graduation, Stoddard was employed in an “editorial position” in 1857 at the Daily Ledger (Chicago); by 1858 he had become editor and proprietor of the Central Illinois Gazette, in Champaign, Illinois.

Stoddard knew Lincoln, worked hard for his election, and received a government appointment. He first served as a clerk in the Interior Department. On July 15, 1861, he was appointed "Secretary to the President to sign land patents". After a brief period of service in the Army, Stoddard became Assistant private secretary to Lincoln and "one of three people doing all the White House clerical work during the early Lincoln administration". Preparation of a digest of newspaper articles was one of his original responsibilities; it was stopped because, according to Stoddard, "Mr. Lincoln never found time to spend an hour upon laborious condensations." He personally made the first copy of the draft Emancipation Proclamation in September 1862.

After two bouts with typhoid, Stoddard left his White House post in July 1864. On 24 Sept 1864 he was appointed United States Marshal for Arkansas; however, in 1865 he resigned for health reasons. He moved to New York City and worked on Wall Street. He entered government service again from 1871–73, this time for the government of New York City. He was a clerk for the Department of Docks.

Stoddard first published work in 1869. He wrote both poetry and fiction, ultimately producing over a hundred books, including 76 books for boys.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >