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The Tao of Muhammad Ali
     

The Tao of Muhammad Ali

5.0 1
by Davis Miller
 

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Muhammad Ali is the greatest boxer the world has ever known and the most charismatic athlete of all time. Adored by millions, Ali is a role model and symbol of courage to us all. Davis Miller was a small, sickly child mourning the loss of his mother when he first encountered Ali. From this meeting, there developed a strong personal relationship that has lasted more

Overview

Muhammad Ali is the greatest boxer the world has ever known and the most charismatic athlete of all time. Adored by millions, Ali is a role model and symbol of courage to us all. Davis Miller was a small, sickly child mourning the loss of his mother when he first encountered Ali. From this meeting, there developed a strong personal relationship that has lasted more than thirty years. Brilliantly weaving Ali's story with his own coming-of-age memoir, Miller captures the true meaning of hero worship, fathers and sons, and strength through wisdom.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"Ali's life has been documented many times over—but never has anyone captured the essence of his ongoing appeal as well as Miller."
—Wes Lukowski, Booklist

"A fine rare book....This story is a classic, one of the standards against which I'll measure all other sports writing."
—Glenn Stout, editor of The Best American Sports Writing

"No one has ever written so purely about Ali before. Indeed, perhaps no one has ever written so purely about anyone."
—Tim Kawakami, Los Angeles Times

"What brilliant stories these are. Davis Miller writes profoundly and beautifully."          
—Joyce Carol Oates

"Miller's astounding book, more in the tradition of contemporary writers such as Tobias Wolff and Richard Ford than that of mere boxing biographies, is a seminal interpretation of fame, how it affects both those who have it and those who live in its shadow."
—Esquire

Daily Telegraph
Miller is Ali's spiritual Boswell. A compelling, strange and beautiful book.
FHM
An instant classic.
Tim Kawakami
Nobody has ever written so purely about Ali before. Maybe no one has ever written so purely about anyone.
Los Angeles Times
Matthew DeAbitua
Miller's astounding book, more in the tradition of writers such as Tobias Wolff, Richard Ford and Tim O'Brien than that of mere biographies, is a seminal interpretation of fame, how it affects both those who have it and those who live in its shadow.
Esquire
Michael Mulhall
Filled with the clarity of ordinary human experience. Miller's best writing occurs when he recalls periods of his life when Ali was not part of it, for example the buzz of early journalistic successes or the sudden illness that took his father's life. After all, the real Zen lesson to be learned from a man like Ali, Miller argues, has nothing to do with lionizing the mighty infallible heroes whom we aspire to be. It is, instead, about living with the potent fallibility of ourselves.
Times Literary Supplement
Tom Shroder
When this manuscript arrived at our offices, we were floored by its extraordinary insight, unprecedented intimacy, and unexpected conclusions. Miller has elevated lowly celebrity journalism to the level of timeless literature. It is an honor to nominate his story for the Pulitzer Prize for feature writing.
from the Miami Herald's Pulitzer Prize nomination
Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
To Miller, a contributing editor to Sport magazine, it seems as if Muhammad Ali has always been a part of his life-even as far back as January 1964, when the author "had just turned twelve and was the shortest and skinniest and sickliest kid in town." It was then that Miller first saw Ali, then known as Cassius Clay, on TV, in connection with his fight against Sonny Liston. Ali was, as always, supremely confident: "I'm young and handsome and fast and pretty and can't possibly be beat," Miller heard the boxer say. For Miller, "the voice was cooking with the cosmic." In this engaging blend of autobiography and portrait, Miller goes on to tell of meeting Ali in person, in 1975, at the boxer's training camp in Pennsylvania, where the writer sparred with the champ and took a punch that dazed him. Although Miller has met other boxing legends, Ali, he says, is in a class by himself-not only for his consummate skill and self-assurance but for other qualities as well, such as the quiet, sure, unmistakable way he befriends and enlivens others, seemingly relieving them at least in part of their troubles and worries. The author leaves no doubt that his admiration for and friendship with Ali has had a benevolent-perhaps salvational-effect on his own life. While the exact nature of Ali's effect on Miller remains unclear, the picture of Ali presented here offers many clues-the man Miller portrays so vividly is, though physically slowed by Parkinson's syndrome, full of charm, wit and religious fervor ("I've been everywhere in the world, seen everything, had everything a man can have. Don't none of it mean nothin'.... The only thing that matters is submitting to the will of God"). Told in clean, spare prose, Miller's warm celebration of Ali will have readers cheering for the man who calls himself "The Greatest of all Times"-and for his Boswell too. Simultaneous Time Warner AudioBook.(Nov.)
Library Journal
Miller's spiritual journey with friend Ali.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780609804537
Publisher:
Crown/Archetype
Publication date:
09/28/1999
Edition description:
1 AMER ED
Pages:
320
Product dimensions:
5.16(w) x 8.00(h) x 0.70(d)

What People are Saying About This

Joyce Carol Oates
What brilliant stories these are! Davis Miller writes profoundly and beautifully.
Glenn Stout
The Tao of Muhammad Ali resonates with wisdom. A classic.
Editor, The Best American Sports Writing

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The Tao of Muhammad Ali 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
The book is a biography of the life of author Davis Miller and not of Muhammad Ali as one might first think. It follows his life from high school to the near present day and details his growing fascination with 'The Greatest' from his childhood. The book centres mainly around the author's life changing events and how Ali influenced them or pulled him through them. It ends with Miller meeting Ali, which prompted him to write his award winning story 'My Dinner With Ali', and how he came to be good friends with the champ. The book offers a great deal of insight into how Ali lives his life nowadays and how he has changed since his disability took a strong hold of him. Most of all it shows us that Ali is as strong as ever and needs pity from no-one. There are passages in this book that will make you cry, others that will make you laugh and some that will have you itching to know what happens next. For those who want to know about the real Ali I recommend this over biographies such as Muhammad Ali: His Life And Times, by Thomas hauser or King of the World by David Remnick. Should you choose to read this title and would like to read more about the man himself rather than his achievements, then I would recommend I'm A Little Special, A Muhammad Ali Reader, Edited by Gerald Early and The Best American Sportswriting Of The Century. Miller's article 'My Dinner With Ali' is in both. This too features more insight rather than dates and figures. If you want to read just one thing on Ali then make it 'the Tao Of Muhammad Ali'.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Reviewer: Zen from Pontefract, West Yorkshire, England Davis Miller deserves a medal! He takes one of the last centuries greatest icons and places Ali firmly within the context of how everyday life unfolds via the medium of his (Miller's)own experience.There is great wisdom between the covers of this book. Enough said. You don't need more reviews,do yourself a favour JUST BUY IT AND READ IT! Miller's Tao of Bruce Lee is also good.