The Tao of Poop: Keeping Your Sanity (and Your Soul) while Raising a Baby by Vivian E. Glyck, NOOK Book (eBook) | Barnes & Noble
The Tao of Poop: Keeping Your Sanity (and Your Soul) While Raising a Baby

The Tao of Poop: Keeping Your Sanity (and Your Soul) While Raising a Baby

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by Vivian E. Glyck
     
 

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There's a lot of romance about becoming a parent, but at some point the storybook scenarios of serene life with baby are interrupted by the darker side of the motherhood experience: the little "bundle of joy" cries inconsolably,
wakes up four times a night, won't take a bottle—the fantasy of motherhood quickly collides with reality. Vivian

Overview

There's a lot of romance about becoming a parent, but at some point the storybook scenarios of serene life with baby are interrupted by the darker side of the motherhood experience: the little "bundle of joy" cries inconsolably,
wakes up four times a night, won't take a bottle—the fantasy of motherhood quickly collides with reality. Vivian Glyck shows us that in fact it's the difficult parts of parenting that are the most valuable. The many challenges call on us to grow and develop as people. "Parenting," Glyck writes,
"is the ultimate spiritual practice."

The
Tao of Poop

presents ten valuable life lessons that arise amid all the challenges of parenting. Based on the author's own experience and drawing on the sentiments of many mothers she's corresponded with, each chapter explores a common parenting predicament and a lesson that can be drawn from it, as well as helpful tips and strategies she calls "sanity savers."

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780834826779
Publisher:
Shambhala Publications, Inc.
Publication date:
11/19/2013
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
363 KB

Read an Excerpt

Introduction

If you're reading this book, you’re probably in the thick of things right now. You’ve recently had a baby or you’re expecting one. In short, your life is in the process of changing. You may even feel like the ground underneath you is giving way. I hope you’ll take away two basic messages from this book. First, you already have all that you need.
Trusting your intuition will serve you more than the latest parenting trend. Second, there’s no escap­ing the poop—both literally and metaphorically. Much of parenthood is messy, challenging, and unpleasant, but the hard parts of motherhood actually offer us the most po­tential for growth. How we choose to deal with “the poop” will determine our experience and perhaps our children’s as well.

I wrote this book as a way of collecting and sharing insights about the path of motherhood. Interspersed throughout the book are my stories and also the stories of other mothers who’ve come up against their own expecta­tions, joys, and frustrations—and discovered valuable life lessons. I hope that our stories will help you to stay in touch with your own wisdom, your own authenticity, along this journey.

Each chapter includes a list of “sanity savers” and “thought exercises” to guide you toward the freedom that comes with understanding yourself and accepting your own choices in spite of, or in the face of, the stress,
sleep deprivation, and worries you may be feeling. The sanity savers are practical suggestions from me and other moth­ers, ideas of what you can do to find balance in a job that often throws you off center. The thought exercises are lists of questions to help you to tap into your own inner wis­dom. These questions can be answered in writing in a journal or they can just be contemplated.

Being a mother is the most joyous experience of my life. At the risk of sounding mushy, I can honestly say that being a mother completes me in ways that I didn’t know were possible. Over and over, other mothers
I’ve spoken with confess that the love they feel for their children is big­ger than any love they’ve experienced before. They feel split wide open by this love.

At the same time, many of us have felt overwhelmed by the challenges of motherhood: trying to keep our precious ones safe; feeling responsible for their physical, intellectual, emotional, and social growth;
sorting through the sea of information on parenting to keep up with the latest. Then there is the media to contend with—everywhere we look there are images of what motherhood should look and feel like, images that often just make us feel inadequate. The question is: As mothers today, how can we stay sane and true to ourselves?

I’m happy to tell you that we can find balance on this journey—and real wisdom. The challenges and intensity of motherhood can help us become more whole as individuals. Motherhood can help us evolve into more complete versions of ourselves—stronger, wiser, more resourceful, and fully connected to the power of our own love. In my experience,
parenting is the ultimate spiritual practice. It wakes me up on a daily basis, commanding me to stop and pay homage to the ways of the universe. Above all, being a parent calls on me to finally under­stand that I am not in control—never have been, never will be.

In a way, becoming a mother is like having a big mirror placed in front of you, one that reflects all of your expectations, weaknesses, and strengths, as well as the limitless love you are capable of, love that was impossible to imagine before. This is the good news. Parenting can bring us face to face with ourselves in a deep, lasting way. And it can become an invaluable teacher.

Parenting has taught me, above all, to take a deep breath and just be with what is—whether it’s frustration, tenderness, anger, helplessness, or joy.
When the going gets tough—when the storybook scenarios of serene life with baby collide with the messy realities—I’ve learned to just stop and breathe. I watch the judgments I have about myself or my child; I
observe them rising up within me. I remember that I’m not my feelings;
I’m not this mon­soon of fear or impatience or anxiety. When I stop and breathe, soon I see that I’m OK and my kid’s OK, just as we are.

If we can become more aware of how things really are in this very moment,
rather than how we want them to be, this parenting thing can become a lot more fun. We can actually learn to embrace and accept ourselves exactly as we are: the lousiest parent on the planet and the Divine
Mother, all rolled into one.

Meet the Author

Vivian Elisabeth Glyck is the author of Twelve Lessons on Life I Learned from My Garden. She is also an accomplished entrepreneur and strategic marketing consultant. She lives in San Diego with her husband and son.

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