The Teapots Are Out and Other Eccentric Tales from Ireland

The Teapots Are Out and Other Eccentric Tales from Ireland

5.0 7
by John B. Keane
     
 

View All Available Formats & Editions

A fitting tribute to John B. Keane, for decades Ireland’s favorite storyteller, this winning short story collection typifies the late author’s folkloric imagination and storytelling arts. These are congenial tales, too, as this literary legend views the foibles and fallibilities of Irish country folk with abundant compassion as well as a shrewd, sometimes… See more details below

Overview

A fitting tribute to John B. Keane, for decades Ireland’s favorite storyteller, this winning short story collection typifies the late author’s folkloric imagination and storytelling arts. These are congenial tales, too, as this literary legend views the foibles and fallibilities of Irish country folk with abundant compassion as well as a shrewd, sometimes sardonic eye. Add to that Keane’s glorious sense of fun and roguery that will make readers relish all the more how and why, in “Fred Rimble,” Jim Conlon kills the best friend he ever had. Or how Willie Ramley determines that his future wife will be “Guaranteed Pure.” Or how, to tragic as well as comic effect, a gasp, garlic, and gossip undo Denny Bruder in “The Hanging.” In all, Keane uncovers the folly in the romantic pangs, exalted aspirations, misguided mischief, and everyday shortcomings of the characters in the village of his storyteller’s mind—and beyond the folly finds their humanity.

Read More

Editorial Reviews

Kirkus Reviews
Seventeen tales from Keane (An Irish Christmas Feast, 2002, etc.), the late and much-lamented Kerry saloonkeeper who was perhaps one of Ireland's best storytellers since Sean O'Faolain. Keane's Ireland is a land of sleepy villages full of silent bachelor farmers who live with their mothers and never venture forth except to market, pub, or Mass-a nostalgic stereotype, perhaps, but an enchanting one that conjures up images of a lost world. Many of these pieces are yarns rather than stories: "Guaranteed Pure," for example, describes a forlorn American who goes to Ireland in search of a virginal bride and ends up marrying a girl he met dressed in an old Sunrise Flour ("Guaranteed Pure") sack, while "You're On Next Sunday" relates the unfortunate adventures of a drunken farmer who plays a game of football with a team of ghosts-they're so impressed with his skill that they draft him for the squad. But it's not all blarney. Many of the tales are stark (and not wholly appealing) portraits of the simplicity of rural life. The title story offers a glimpse of life inside an intensely unhappy house shared by a married couple and a sister-in-law who live together but eat at three separate tables, and "Protocol" is a humorous if depressing account of a taciturn farmer who spends an entire evening drinking with neighbors before telling them that his brother has just died. Some of the stories are openly sentimental-in "The Fort Field," for example, an old man comes to appreciate that his beloved meadow is "a land worth fighting for"-while others are more wry (as when an entire village is transformed by a sexy blond tourist in "The Change"). Best is "The Curriculum Vitae," a Christmas tale about a haplessvillage postmaster who rebelliously defies everyone (including his gorgon of a wife) by awarding a postal job to a meek, unemployed father. A rich and delightful feast from an old master. Agent: James Gill/PFD

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780786748990
Publisher:
Running Press Book Publishers
Publication date:
02/10/2004
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
192
Sales rank:
591,773
File size:
0 MB

Related Subjects

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >