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The Teeny Tiny Ghost and the Monster
     

The Teeny Tiny Ghost and the Monster

by Kay Winters, Lynn Munsinger (Illustrator)
 

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"Listen up!" said the teacher to the teeny tiny class. "The Spook and Spirit Club is sponsoring a contest for all the ghostsin our teeny tiny school. It's a Make a Monster contest — just in time for Halloween!"

All the ghosts in the teeny tiny class are excited to make their own monsters: scary monsters, hairy monsters, boy- and girl-eating monsters! All

Overview

"Listen up!" said the teacher to the teeny tiny class. "The Spook and Spirit Club is sponsoring a contest for all the ghostsin our teeny tiny school. It's a Make a Monster contest — just in time for Halloween!"

All the ghosts in the teeny tiny class are excited to make their own monsters: scary monsters, hairy monsters, boy- and girl-eating monsters! All the ghosts, that is, except one.

The Teeny Tiny Ghost isn't excited at all. The Teeny Tiny Ghost is scared. He doesn't like monsters: not scary monsters, not hairy monsters, not even boy- and girl-eating monsters.What will he do?

Find out in this sweet and spooky story from Kay Winters and Lynn Munsinger. You don't have to be a ghost to fall in love with the Teeny Tiny Ghost as he struggles with real-life problems like bullies and overwhelming school assignments. And you'll cheer for him as he comes out on top!

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
In The Teeny Tiny Ghost and the Monster, Kay Winters and Lynn Munsinger's third outing starring the diminutive hero, he resists drawing a picture for his school's Make a Monster contest. ("That would be much too scary,/ like a nightmare coming true," he thinks.) After two bullies ridicule his anxiety, the teeny tiny fellow sculpts a "friendly monster" out of junkyard parts and wins first prize. (Aug.) Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
Children's Literature
Most of the young ghosts in class think that the Spook and Spirit Club's contest to create the scariest monster just in time for Halloween is a terrific idea; that is, everyone except the timid and teeny tiniest ghost. He and his small black cats are tremendously intimidated by the thought of it. Plus he is called a wimp by Wilma and bothered by Buster. But the teeny tiny ghost shows great creativity and ultimately triumphs, winning not only the contest (to the great surprise of both Wilma and Buster) but also a healthy dose of self-confidence. The descriptor "teeny tiny" is repeated throughout the story, reminiscent of the early English folktale of the same title. That is where the similarity ends. The story is completely recast. The lively text is rhythmic, rhyming and alliterative accompanied by lighthearted, very humorous cartoon-like illustrations. Together they sweep across each double page spread to the satisfying conclusion and will remind human children that they, too, can overcome almost anything when they put their minds to it. 2004, HarperCollins, Ages 4 to 8.
—Maria Salvadore
School Library Journal
K-Gr 3-All of the ghosts in the teeny tiny school are excited about the upcoming Make a Monster contest-except the timid teeny tiny ghost, who finds the very idea frightening. At the end of the school day, he has not come up with any inspiration for his picture. On the way home, he flies over a dump filled with "raggy, saggy sofas" and wires, springs, clocks, and wheels. He gathers together a box of assorted junk and goes home. That evening, he constructs his monster. When he takes his junkyard creation to school, the other students smirk, snicker, and giggle. During recess, however, the Spook and Spirit Club judges the entries. The blue ribbon is hanging on teeny tiny ghost's friendly monster. In Munsinger's funny illustrations, the school is replete with spiders, bats, and cobwebs. The students are fashionably dressed in hoodies, T-shirts, and skirts. The teeny tiny ghost sports his signature red baseball cap and clutches his two black cats. The ghosts are energetic in action and expression, and their creations are more goofy than scary. Great fun as a Halloween read-aloud.-Linda Staskus, Cuyahoga County Public Library, Parma, OH Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780060288853
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date:
09/07/2004
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
8.00(w) x 10.00(h) x 0.25(d)
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

Meet the Author

Kay Winters, a former teacher and language arts consultant, is now devoting herself to writing for children full-time. Kay is the author of a number of children's books, including Whooo's Haunting The Teeny Tiny Ghost?, also illustrated by Lynn Munsinger; Did You See What I Saw?: Poems about School, illustrated by Martha Weston; and Abe Lincoln: The Boy Who Loved Books, illustrated by Nancy Carpenter.Kay lives in Bucks County, Pennsylvania, with her husband, Earl. Her favorite Halloween costume is Little Red Riding Hood — she still has a long red cape and a basket!

Lynn Munsinger has illustrated many favorite books for children, including The Teeny Tiny Ghost and Whooo's Haunting the Teeny Tiny Ghost? by Kay Winters. She divides her time between Vermont and Massachusetts.

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