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The Tempest (Applause First Folio Editions)
     

The Tempest (Applause First Folio Editions)

3.7 62
by William Shakespeare, Neil Freeman (Editor)
 

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(Applause Books). If there has ever been a groundbreaking edition that likewise returns the reader to the original Shakespeare text, it will be THE APPLAUSE FOLIO TEXTS. If there has ever been an accessible version of the Folio, it is this edition, set for the first time in modern fonts. The Folio is the source of all other editions. The Folio text forces us to

Overview

(Applause Books). If there has ever been a groundbreaking edition that likewise returns the reader to the original Shakespeare text, it will be THE APPLAUSE FOLIO TEXTS. If there has ever been an accessible version of the Folio, it is this edition, set for the first time in modern fonts. The Folio is the source of all other editions. The Folio text forces us to re-examine the assumptions and prejudices which have encumbered over four hundred years of scholarship and performance. Notes refer the reader to subsequent editorial interventions, and offer the reader a multiplicity of interpretations. Notes also advise the reader on variations between Folios and Quartos. Prepared and annotated by Neil Freeman, Head, Graduate Directing Program, University of British Columbia.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Prospero-like in their artistry, Spirin's dazzling watercolors dominate this retelling of Shakespeare's final play. Shaped like altar panels fit for a Renaissance church or palace, the illustrations are romantic, regal and magical, richly interpreting the play's themes of betrayal, revenge and all-conquering love. A wispy ethereal air pervades island scenes, beautifully suggesting the atmosphere of enchantment, while Antonio and the King of Naples are pictured in brocade and velvet, the stench of power upon them. The other characters, too, are both otherworldly and very much flesh and blood. Especially well rendered is the monster Caliban, shown here as part man, part beast, part mythical creature, a sense of evil glee lighting his features. While this prose adaptation does not, of course, retain the full magic of the Bard's work, Beneduce nonetheless provides an intelligent, gripping story. Several passages from Shakespeare introduced at key points give a taste of the original. Symbols and small pictures integrated into the text further enhance the lavish presentation. All ages. (Mar.)
Children's Literature - Susie Wilde
Shakespeare comes to picture books beautifully when Ann Beneduce retells the complex story of The Tempest in a way that's understandable to children. She's helped by the very classic looking illustrations of Gennady Spirin, who captures the magic of spirits and beasts.
Children's Literature - Marilyn Courtot
The Tempest becomes accessible to children through the retelling skill of Bruce Coville and the glowing illustrations of Sanderson. This fairy tale of magic and love, demons and spirits, has much to attract today's children and to introduce them to the works of the master.
Children's Literature - Uma Krishnaswami
With clever interplay of original dialogue and adapted text, the bard's immortal work is here transformed into a charming "once-upon-a-time" tale. Purists might bemoan the deletion of lines, verses, even whole scenes, but no one can complain that the spirit of the play has not been faithfully transmitted. It has been transmitted with grace and elegance, moreover, and with an acute perception of a young reader's capabilities. Spirin's illustrations are exquisite.
Children's Literature - Rebecca Joseph
Shipwrecks, storms at sea, magicians, sorcerers, revenge, love, all these and more take place in Shakespeare's play The Tempest which John Escott brings to life for young people. Readers will come to understand Propsero, the former Duke of Milan, who was cast out to sea with his young daughter by Antonio. They arrived at a mysterious island filled with magical characters. Prospero causes a tempest that shipwrecks Antonio and his young son Ferdinand on the same island that has been Prospero and daughter Miranda's home. Through the pages of this beautiful adaptation, we watch Prospero take revenge, but in the end come to terms with his magic and those who had done him wrong. Accompanied with exquisite pictures of the different characters and the conflicts, The Tempest comes alive in this version.
VOYA - Roxy Ekstrom
This book is designed to help students read a play written in an English used 350 years ago-but the reader has to get to page 105 among the appendices to learn the book's intended audience. This information would have been more helpful as an introduction, instead of the offbeat one found here. The book's strength lies in its page-by-page notes that explain difficult words, archaic phrases, and historical/literary allusions. An occasional note may be more than the student wants, but most are useful without being dumbed-down. The notes are also helpfully placed alongside the text rather than at the bottom of the page, a feature students might like if they are not put off by the resultant double-column appearance.

While the notes should be useful to students at any grade level, the appended material, both introductory and supplementary, is marked by style and vocabulary making it suitable only for the most advanced and/or interested high school or undergraduate students. Among the appendices is a modern poem with no explanation for its inclusion, and no identification of the poet whose poem does allude to the The Tempest. One gets the impression of a mountain of unrelated three-by-five cards being used, with no effort to bridge them together. A long appendix titled "Classwork and Examination," which is a collection of very good ideas for teachers, is strangely addressed to students.

The cover features a fine color photograph of Sweden's Max Von Sydow as Prospero and Rudi Davies as Miranda, but one wonders if a picture of the young lovers or Caliban the monster would have been more appealing to young readers. Students could make good use of this book by ignoring most of the scholarly appendages and using the excellent footnotes to elucidate one of the most enjoyable of Shakespeare's profound works. Illus. Charts. Source Notes. Further Reading. Chronology. Appendix.

VOYA Codes: 2Q 2P S (Better editing or work by the author might have warranted a 3Q, For the YA rea

School Library Journal
Gr 3 Up-The play is set circa 1610. Spirin expands Beneduce's retelling by basing his lavish watercolors on Italian Renaissance paintings. Though the pages are carefully framed, highly ornate, and formally structured, there is plenty of leeway for individual imagination to make itself felt. Ariel is a decorative Renaissance angel. Caliban is given piscine characteristics and expressions that evoke the longing as much as the brutishness in his character. And the human characters have the complexity of portraits. Spirin's illustrations highlight the fantastic while Ruth Sanderson's landscapes for Bruce Coville's version of the play (Doubleday, 1994) focus on the effects of nature. Both are valid. Coville's simpler retelling is easier to follow. Beneduce, too, eliminates some of the subplots in order to avoid confusion, but her fuller text manages to incorporate most of the romantic, magical, and political elements. Within the main text, she modernizes the dialogue. This works smoothly for the most part, though it's hard to see how "What a wonderful new world I am about to enter..." is an improvement over "O brave new world..." A few passages of original text are set off in isolated frames, for a sense of the poetry. Readers and potential playgoers will need to see the play performed to experience the comic scenes of Caliban and his cronies. Brief appendixes explain the context in which the play was written and the reteller's choices and give an overview of Shakespeare's life. This is a case in which an acceptably graceful text plays a supporting role to the illustrations. They are worth the price of admission.-Sally Margolis, formerly at Deerfield Public Library, IL
Kirkus Reviews
Beneduce (A Weekend With Winslow Homer, 1993, etc.) retells Shakespeare's play in a text that reads like a fairy tale.

This version emphasizes first the love story between Miranda and Ferdinand and then Prospero's forgiveness of his enemies. Some of the subplots have been eliminated (for reasons given in a careful author's note), but several songs and speeches have been folded into the story, much of which is told in dialogue. Spirin's beautiful watercolors are done in the manner of Renaissance paintings, even to the effect of old varnish affecting the tones. The scenes echo the narrative's focus on the enchantments of the play, presenting beasts worthy of Hieronymous Bosch and gentle spirits to rival the angels of Botticelli. This gorgeous picture book will be particularly useful in high school collections, for the story in the art sets the stage for this Renaissance drama. Recommended for public and school libraries: Not only does it work as a read-alone story but will prepare theatergoers for a performance of the full play.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781557832955
Publisher:
Hal Leonard Corporation
Publication date:
02/01/2000
Series:
Applause First Folio Editions Series
Edition description:
ANNOTATED
Pages:
148
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.10(h) x 0.60(d)

Meet the Author

Widely esteemed as the greatest writer in the English language, William Shakespeare (1564-1616) was an actor and theatrical producer in addition to writing plays and sonnets. Dubbed "The Bard of Avon," Shakespeare oversaw the building of the Globe Theatre in London, where a number of his plays were staged, the best-known of which include Romeo and Juliet, Hamlet, and Macbeth. The First Folio, a printed book of 36 of his comedies, tragedies, and history plays, was published in 1623.

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The Tempest 3.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 62 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The reason I read this play was because of personal reasons. My ancestor Stephen Hopkins was aboard the Sea Venture in which influenced this play. Good read. Derek D
Guest More than 1 year ago
You need to take your time because if you rush into it you will not get the full effect as you will if you would take your time and understand. I think that you should read this and act out some of your favorite scenes!!! Just have FUN!!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I personally feel that of all of Shakespeare's works, the language in The Tempest is one of the easiest to understand. That being said, the notes and meanings given on the left-hand pages helped immensely while reading. I will ALWAYS buy Barnes and Noble Shakespeare.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
"Guys? I'm gonna turn in for the night. My head is throbbing and my eyes are hurting really bad. I love you Mason. Everyone else goodnight" She falls on a pew falling asleep.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
"Good." She nods.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
(( True feelings come out! DX ))
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
She vowed to kill anyone who tried to fo<_>rcema<_>te her.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
O.o......this is a once in a lifetime offer, kit.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Bbt. Sis is an ass...
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Because I never received it. I am writing this review because I have had the most abysmal customer service from B&N. I contacted B&N after my package failed to arrive, though marked as delivered. They promptly responded via email and asked me to reply to the email indicating whether I wanted to cancel or have them ship out a new item, free of charge. I replied immediately to please ship a new item. I did not receive a confirmation or response. Days go by and I reply to the same thread, asking if they had an update; still no response. I continually monitor my online account for any changes. Finally, after a week, I call and ask about my order. The customer service representative said there was no record of my contact. I forwarded the entire email exchange to complain about the lack of response and never heard back. I submitted a separate email complaint to let them know that as a B&N member for the past six years, it was really disappointing that they couldn't even bother to acknowledge my dismal experience. Obviously, I have never heard back; however, I still get "reminder" emails that I have items in my cart. Meanwhile, I had the exact same problem with Amazon and they replaced my order AND upgraded me to overnight shipping AND gave me a five dollar credit for the hassle. I will not be shopping at Barnes and Noble anymore, which is truly a shame. I am so disappointed.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Was hoping to use this to teach my sophomores, but the footnotes are just a black screen. Disappointed I bought the more expensive copy of the play now.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
She does as she is told, bubbling with excitment
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Maybe he'll be the cranky old wizard :)
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
You are funny. One Direction is freaking horrid though. Lol
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Should i read
BonnieMcCune More than 1 year ago
A classic. A number of contemporary plays, movies, and books re-use the plot.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Not in english in chinese
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kay_elle_ More than 1 year ago
I'm reviewing the NookBook formatting, not the play. If you plan on purchasing this in eBook format for a class, I strongly suggest buying it in paperback. There are no line numbers! The footnotes refer to lines, but the lines themselves are numberless! I actually own this in paperback copy, but I left it at my parents' house and I needed it to write a paper. So, naturally I just decided to purchase it for my Nook instead of getting it mailed, however, the whole reason I needed it in the first place (to reference the lines) is nonexistant in the eBook format. Yes, it was only $5, but it almost seems pointless to read Shakespeare without the line numbers for reference.