The Temple of the Golden Pavilion [NOOK Book]

Overview


Mizoguchi has been mentally troubled since he witnessed his mother's infidelity in the presence of his dying father. Mizoguchi feels utterly abandoned and alone until he becomes a pdest at Kinka-kuji, a famous Buddhist temple in Kyoto. Failing in his quest to find the warmth of human companionship in the temple, the young man, tormented by the temple's exquisite beauty, decides to destroy himself and all he loves. He feels he cannot live in peace as long as the temple exists. Mizoguchi, like many other troubled ...
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The Temple of the Golden Pavilion

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Overview


Mizoguchi has been mentally troubled since he witnessed his mother's infidelity in the presence of his dying father. Mizoguchi feels utterly abandoned and alone until he becomes a pdest at Kinka-kuji, a famous Buddhist temple in Kyoto. Failing in his quest to find the warmth of human companionship in the temple, the young man, tormented by the temple's exquisite beauty, decides to destroy himself and all he loves. He feels he cannot live in peace as long as the temple exists. Mizoguchi, like many other troubled Mishima heroes, becomes obsessed with unattainable ideals.

The Temple of the Golden Pavilion reflects Mishima's preoccupations with beauty and death in a clear and unmistakable manner. It is also an excellent example of a theme that frequently arises in Mishima's work: the resentment of the obj ect of desire. Because this novel, arguably Mishima's best, reflects the author's suicidal tendencies, it also offers us insight into one of the twentieth century's greatest and most complex literary icons.

A hopeless stutterer, taunted by his schoolmates, Mizoguchi feels utterly alone until he becomes an acolyte at a famous temple in Kyoto. But he quickly becomes obsessed with the temple's beauty, and cannot live in peace as long as it exists.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"Beautifully translated... Mishima re-erects Kyoto, plain and mountain, monastery, temple, town, as Victor Hugo made Paris out of Notre Dame."

-- The Nation

"An amazing literary feat in its minute delineation of a neurotic personality."

-- Chicago Tribune

Translated from the Japanese by Ivan Morris

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781462902767
  • Publisher: Tuttle Publishing
  • Publication date: 12/20/2011
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 297
  • Sales rank: 284,229
  • File size: 3 MB

Meet the Author

YUKIO MISHIMA, born in Tokyo on january 14, 1925, was probably the most spectacularly talented young Japanese writer to emerge after World War II. Mishima's first novel was published in 1948, shortly after he graduated from Japan's prestigious University of
Tokyo School of Jurisprudence.

Upon leaving the university, he secured a highly coveted position in the Ministry of Finance, but he resigned after just nine months to devote himself fully to his writing. From the time he put pen to paper until his widely publicized death in 1970, he was a very prolific writer, producing some two dozen novels, more than 40 plays, over 90 short stories, several poetry and travel volumes, and hundreds of essays. His mastery won him many top literary awards, among them the 1954 Shinchosha Literary Prize for his novel The Sound of Waves.

Although critics are naturally divided on which of his many works is the ultimate masterpiece, Mishima himself regarded The Sea of Fertility to be his finest effort. He completed his last volume, The Decay of the Angel, on the day of his death by ritual suicide on November 25, 1970. Mishima's writings have been compared to those of Proust, Gide, and Sartre, and his obsession with courage mirrors Ernest Hemingway's.

Today, more than 40 decades since his death, Yukio Mishima remains one of the pivotal figures of modern Japanese literature.
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 7 )
Rating Distribution

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(4)

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Sort by: Showing all of 8 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 11, 2001

    A powerfull story

    If you like to read the best modern Japanese literature, you should choose this book. The theme is heavy and you may feel kind of depressed... but it has a beautiful ending. Knowing the fact that Mishima committed HARAKIRI suicide in his real life might help you to taste this story.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 28, 2012

    Yukio

    reminds me of yugioh.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 21, 2012

    Good book, file sucks

    Loaded with typos. Find a different edition.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 30, 2005

    Great psychological study

    If you haven't yet read Mishima, this would be a good starting point this book gives a good introduction to Mishima's themes (death, beauty, youth, nihilism) and is much more accessible than the Sea of Fertility tetralogy. The darkness and sharpness of Mishima's vision is present here in the study of an acolyte's incerasingly detached internal world. The translation is beautiful and Mishima's writing talent, especially his knack for analogies, shines through. This hardcover edition has a nice print and is definitely worth the extra few bucks over the paperback.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 21, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted April 5, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted May 17, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted October 29, 2008

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 8 Customer Reviews

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