The Tenant of Wildfell Hall (Barnes & Noble Library of Essential Reading)

The Tenant of Wildfell Hall (Barnes & Noble Library of Essential Reading)

4.1 59
by Anne Bronte
     
 

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In The Tenant of Wildfell Hall, Anne Brontë chronicles the disillusionment, heartbreak, and final devastation of an intelligent woman who falls in love with a rake. She flees her disastrous marriage and sets up as a professional artist—a highly unusual and daring step for a woman of her time.  Brontë’s message remains relevant

Overview

In The Tenant of Wildfell Hall, Anne Brontë chronicles the disillusionment, heartbreak, and final devastation of an intelligent woman who falls in love with a rake. She flees her disastrous marriage and sets up as a professional artist—a highly unusual and daring step for a woman of her time.  Brontë’s message remains relevant in a time when the dangerous lover—not unlike the dark and mesmerizing Heathcliff and Rochester respectively of Emily Brontë’s Wuthering Heights and Charlotte Brontë’s Jane Eyre—still lurks in romance narratives, and the belief in the beautiful illusion of saving the lost soul through love retains its seductive power. 

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781411429024
Publisher:
Barnes & Noble
Publication date:
09/01/2009
Series:
Barnes & Noble Library of Essential Reading
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
496
Sales rank:
409,435
File size:
990 KB

Meet the Author

Born in West Yorkshire in 1820, Anne Brontë was the youngest child in a family whose story became legendary.  By the time Anne was five she had witnessed the deaths of her mother and her two eldest sisters. At nineteen, she left to become a governess, but was dismissed for tying the two children to a table leg so that she could have the space to write; the experience led to the novel Agnes Grey (1847).  At her next stint as a governess, she observed examples of an idle and morally lax gentry, which informed her novel The Tenant of Wildfell Hall. After leaving this position in 1845, Anne lived at home for four years, publishing a book of poetry with her sisters. A year after Emily and their brother Branwell died from tuberculosis, Anne too died of tuberculosis, at the age of twenty-nine.

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The Tenant of Wildfell Hall 4.1 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 59 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
In simple words, this is a love story. Mostof the reviews were misleading to me,focusing too much on the unusual-for-its-time plot. It held my interest to the endand unfolds in a fresh way. Anne Bronte should have as much recognition as her twosisters. This particular edition is part ofthe Barnes and Noble Library of EssentialReading, which says it all. There is anintroduction by Deborah Lutz which althoughinteresting to me, is one to question Dr.Lutz and other feminist writers/teachers inmy opinion often read far too much into thewritings of women from past eras and theirconjecture becomes fact, which is misleadingand negative. Of course this makes forlively discussion and that's a good thing!
Guest More than 1 year ago
I love the Bronte's and have read all of their books. This one definatly is one of the best. Anne Bronte should be as well known as her sisters for this amazing novel. It was captivating and i could not put it down. Surprisingly enough, i read it in two days! It was so good, i can't even describe how wonderful it is!
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book is the best Bronte book written. Anne is even better than Charlotte and Emily. The story is amazingly advanced for its time in terms of her criticism of the hypocrisy and misogyny of her society. I could not put this book down!
Guest More than 1 year ago
I am a great lover of Victorian Classics, especially decent novels depicting the importance of love in relationships. This novel by Anne Bronte, I should say is the most touching story I have ever read.. Eventhough the plot is of the early 19th century, the heroine's character cannot be confined to that era. She can be anyone, even a 21st century woman. Being very independent myself, I could identify with her. In some ways, I realized that my nature is very much similar to that of Helen Huntingdon's (the negative traits in her). May be that's the reason why I am drawn to this book and it's leading lady. Mind you, I am not a feminist. This is a book, I think, women (especially younger ones) should read and learn from. The moral strength, sense of responsibility and learning from mistakes... these are top three positive aspects of Helen's character. I realized as I progressed through the book that I need to develop them myself to be a better and strong person. I can assuredly say that Helen Huntingdon is my most favorite heroine of all times. Anne Bronte's portrayal of the character of a strong woman with deep moral conviction who emerges out a winner in life establishes her as a writer with deep sensitivity.
Guest More than 1 year ago
It is unfortunate that Anne Bronte has been slighted for her sisters, Emily and Charlotte. Her novel is written with incredible depth and complexity. Helen Graham, the protagonist, is nothing like her archeptypal Vicorian peers. Bronte establishes her to serve as a means of outcry against the rigidity of the Victorian era, as well as a plea for reform. The novel is an expose on taboo subjects, such as infidelity, domestic abuse and alcoholism. Even more startling is her advice to readers: better to never marry than to marry poorly. This was a very revolutionary idea for the era, for no girl could afford to not marry and maintian whatever status she had. Bronte does not oppose the institution of marriage, rather she recognizes the importance of selecting a worthy mate. The novel provokes much thought and is ideal for discussion environments, whether in academia or social.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is the story of Helen Graham, a mysterious and fiercely independent woman living in a secluded castle during the 19th Century in Victorian England. Helen, along with her son Arthur, is a recluse, and soon becomes the topic of town gossip. She is befriended by Gilbert Markham, who at first is received very coldly by Helen, but he is persistent and wins her trust. It becomes clear that Gilbert has developed intimate feelings for Helen, and although we can guess that she feels the same for him, she is determined to convince him that this is not a proper match. So she gives Gilbert her diary, which vividly details her abusive marriage to Arthur Huntington, an alcoholic and debaucher. Although this may sound like a depressing topic (which it is), Bronte¿s talent is what makes the book so absorbing and satisfying. She incorporates all the necessary ingredients to sufficiently whet your appetite, (romance, suspense, and a plethora of plot twists and turns) and provides a very satisfying, albeit, surprise ending. This is a book I will read again and again. It is a real treasure. By the way, I was told that the Oxfords Classics edition is the best one to buy. It contains a preface by Ann Bronte and the letter to J. Halford Esq. in the beginning, instead of just starting with Chapter One ('You must go back with me'). These were in Anne's original text, and in my opinion, add quite a bit to the entire work. Highly recommended, especially for book clubs. Cris
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The complete text seems to be here, but it's so riddled with typos it's hard to enjoy, or even understand what was trying to be written. All, or nearly all, free versions available via Barnes & Noble seem to have this problem.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
In the introduction to this book the comment is made that if it had not been for the other two Brontes, no one would be reading this book today. I have to disagree. This book has a few issues (mostly there is some confusion about who the narrator is writing to ( a friend but if he is married to the narrators sister, why does the narrator mention his sister got married?) and why he has gone into the narrative in the first place), but the characters and the plot make it easy to overlook the issues. The themes covered in this book are relevant today. It covers the difference between love and infatuation, the effects substance abuse has on families, the courage born from the duty to protect ones child, and in short the refusal to be anyones victim. I felt we got to know the tenant of wildfell hall and observed through her actions and thoughts that she was remarkable and admirable, as opposed to being told by the author that she was such. It was as if we got to understand her, know her and like her they way the narrator did. She was a woman who had many reasons to be small - if she had let the cruel treatment of others, and her lifes disappointments change her. Instead she was remarkable by staying true to herself and to her moral compass. The circumstances in this womans life ,at a time when women had so little empowerment , were the makings of a tragedy. Instead we find a story and a character that was ahead of its time.
Guest More than 1 year ago
The Tenant of Wildfell Hall is one of the most amazing books I have ever read. The themes of this book are, in some ways, more powerful than either Jane Eyre or Wuthering Heights. Helen Huntington has to be one of the most controversial Victorian heroines written of. Her struggles are the one's that most books from this era brush over. This book shows the dark side of life in the nineteenth century, something you will never find in a Jane Austen novel. Everyone should read this!!!!
Guest More than 1 year ago
I have been a fan of the 3 Bronte sisters for more than a year now. I found Charlotte to be an adequet writer, but when I read The Tenant of Wildfell Hall, I knew I had found the best sister of all. Ann Bronte is the one whom little is known about, but she is definately the best writer, towering over her sisters with her masterpiece that I found so engrossing. The Tenant of Wildfell Hall was absolutely incredible, portraying evil being conquered by true love, and finishing with the happiest ending ever!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I haven't read the book yet- but it makes you give a rating. Just in case you are looking at this book, the Collins Classics appears to be from the complete unabridged 2nd edition of the novel. It includes the preface letter in Volume One that I noticed several free editions did not have in it. There are actually 593 pages in this edition not 192 in the product details above.
alc1967 More than 1 year ago
Much better than Jane Eyre or Wuthering Heights. It's a shame that Anne Bronte is not as well known as her sisters, Charolotte and Emily. I find her writing to be much less verbose and much easier to follow. Both this book and her previous book, Agnes Grey, are well written and engage the reader in the story and the characters. I felt like I got to know the characters much better than in Jane Eyre. If you must pick a Bronte sister, go with Anne Bronte and save the others for when you have absolutely nothing else to read. This book got a little "preachy" at times, but it is not overwhelmingly so. Maybe the subject matter was shocking at the time of the original publication, but certainly not in today's society. In fact, I thought it handled the subject matter very well and gave an insider's look at what it is like to love someone who is determined to destroy themselves.
Book-touched More than 1 year ago
I loved this book, it aroused all sorts of emotions in me. Set in the Victorian Era the heroine Helen Huntington Graham could easily be transported to today. Helen angered/frustrated me, puzzeled me and touched my sympathy as did other major characters in the book. It was fun to retire to my modern day garden, read this book and be transported to the Victorian era. It challenged me to think what could have informed Anne Bronte at such a young age and during her time in history of the themes of which she wrote: sextual inequality, feminism, domestic abuse, alcohol/drug addiction, marital infidelity. As I researched this I learned she saw and lived much of it within her own family. Anne earned her place as the best of the Bronte writers.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The quality of the image is so terrible that I couldn't make out more than half the words on some pages. I understand that scanned books will have errors, but the 1858 copy is simply illegible and should be labeled as such.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I loved this book, and cannot understand why Anne Bronte has been so neglected, pushed back back behind her older sisters. I love most of Charlotte's books as well, but The Tenant of Wildfell Hall is my favorite. It is so well written, and so engrossing, that the closer I came to the end, the slower I read, for fear that it would be over.
AnonMI 9 months ago
Far more religion that goes on for pages than is in any of her superior sisters works, and her love story is rather juvenile, with its trumped up ending so that everyone will be thoroughly happy and financially well provided for and everyone bad will get their just desserts from fate (or God as Anne would put it). The superiority of her sisters work is so obvious it bears almost no comparison. I muddled through it so as to, frankly, say that I did read it and found it wanting in every respect.
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Exciting novel, one of my favourites, with a strong-willed main heroine and her wonderful story. "The Tenant" was praised before me, so I will write here only about this edition of it. 1. The only good thing in this edition is an introduction by Dr. Lutz. Very helpful, well-written and informative. 2. With exception of the aforementioned introduction this is copy of Progect Gutenberg edition which in its turn a copy of 1920 copy of 1900 edition of "The Tenant". 3. It's an incomplete edition (see Wikipedia for more information about mutilated editions of "The Tenant"). The Prologue, some parts of the text and chapter headings are omitted. Complete novel begins with: "Dear Halford, when we were together last..." 4. There is stupid out-dated and out of place introduction by M.A. Ward, sometime a renown anti-feminist writer. "The Tenant" is clearly a feminist novel, and you may guess what did she write about Anne and her novel. Ward's criticism is absolutely unjust. Below in my recommendations I've added the editions of "The Tenant" which I know to be complete. If you want to read the novel in its best, buy one of this editions.
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