The Tenant of Wildfell Hall

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Overview

When a mysterious widow, her servant and son arrive at a vacant mansion, gossip and intrigue follow. But a local farmer soon discovers the truth; that she has escaped from her abusive, cheating husband. Will their love stand a chance as long as her husband is alive? Join us for a classic and controversial tale, a gritty story of bravery, betrayal and romance; considered to be one of the first feminist novels, the first to deal with female alcoholism, and the last written by Anne...
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The Tenant of Wildfell Hall (Barnes & Noble Library of Essential Reading)

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Overview

When a mysterious widow, her servant and son arrive at a vacant mansion, gossip and intrigue follow. But a local farmer soon discovers the truth; that she has escaped from her abusive, cheating husband. Will their love stand a chance as long as her husband is alive? Join us for a classic and controversial tale, a gritty story of bravery, betrayal and romance; considered to be one of the first feminist novels, the first to deal with female alcoholism, and the last written by Anne Bronte.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781490568423
  • Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform
  • Publication date: 6/28/2013
  • Pages: 510
  • Sales rank: 1,038,309
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 1.03 (d)

Meet the Author

Anne Bronte was born on January 17, 1820, in Thornton, Yorkshire, England, the youngest of six children and member of the three Bronte sisters who became authors. Her father was a curate and her mother died of cancer when she was only a year old.
Anne's father required someone to help with the children, so her mother's sister moved in to take over. In 1824, four of the daughters were sent to boarding school, but when the two older daughters died from tuberculosis, the two younger ones were brought home. For the next five years, she was educated by her father and aunt, studying art and music.
Anne also spent a great deal of time reading in her father's large library, enjoying books by authors such as Homer, Shakespeare, Milton and Scott. After a while, the sisters began creating elaborate stories to entertain themselves, eventually writing them down.
At age fifteen, Anne attended Roe Head School, with sister Charlotte as her teacher, but she became ill and returned home, taking a job as a governess for four children, which she did for five years.
In 1845, the three sisters compiled a book of poems, and with money their aunt had left them, they were able to have it published. Not wanting anyone to know they were women, the sisters adopted pseudonyms, with Anne calling herself Acton Bell. Unfortunately, only two copies sold. Anne however, still using the Acton name began to publish her work in magazines.
In 1846, all three of the sisters were working on novels and Anne finished "Agnes Grey." Her second novel, "The Tenant of Wildfell Hall," was released in 1848 and became an instant success, though some of the subject matter was considered controversial at the time.
In 1848, a rumor that the "Bell brothers" were all the same person began to circulate and Anne and Charlotte went to London to reveal themselves to their publisher.
In 1848, Anne's brother died at age 31, then three months later, sister Emily died at 30. Then on May 28, 1849, Charlotte died while on a trip with sister Charlotte to Scarborough, Yorkshire, England, at the age of 29. Charlotte had her buried in St. Mary's churchyard in Scarborough, instead of with the rest of the family in Hayworth, not even waiting for their father to arrive.
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 38 )
Rating Distribution

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(20)

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(12)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 47 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 30, 2008

    Excellent story!

    In simple words, this is a love story. Mostof the reviews were misleading to me,focusing too much on the unusual-for-its-time plot. It held my interest to the endand unfolds in a fresh way. Anne Bronte should have as much recognition as her twosisters. This particular edition is part ofthe Barnes and Noble Library of EssentialReading, which says it all. There is anintroduction by Deborah Lutz which althoughinteresting to me, is one to question Dr.Lutz and other feminist writers/teachers inmy opinion often read far too much into thewritings of women from past eras and theirconjecture becomes fact, which is misleadingand negative. Of course this makes forlively discussion and that's a good thing!

    6 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 20, 2008

    Amazing

    I love the Bronte's and have read all of their books. This one definatly is one of the best. Anne Bronte should be as well known as her sisters for this amazing novel. It was captivating and i could not put it down. Surprisingly enough, i read it in two days! It was so good, i can't even describe how wonderful it is!

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 4, 2008

    Anne Bronte's Best Novel

    This book is the best Bronte book written. Anne is even better than Charlotte and Emily. The story is amazingly advanced for its time in terms of her criticism of the hypocrisy and misogyny of her society. I could not put this book down!

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 26, 2002

    A Secret That Should Not Be

    It is unfortunate that Anne Bronte has been slighted for her sisters, Emily and Charlotte. Her novel is written with incredible depth and complexity. Helen Graham, the protagonist, is nothing like her archeptypal Vicorian peers. Bronte establishes her to serve as a means of outcry against the rigidity of the Victorian era, as well as a plea for reform. The novel is an expose on taboo subjects, such as infidelity, domestic abuse and alcoholism. Even more startling is her advice to readers: better to never marry than to marry poorly. This was a very revolutionary idea for the era, for no girl could afford to not marry and maintian whatever status she had. Bronte does not oppose the institution of marriage, rather she recognizes the importance of selecting a worthy mate. The novel provokes much thought and is ideal for discussion environments, whether in academia or social.

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 5, 2001

    Beautiful! A Wonderful and Engrossing story

    This is the story of Helen Graham, a mysterious and fiercely independent woman living in a secluded castle during the 19th Century in Victorian England. Helen, along with her son Arthur, is a recluse, and soon becomes the topic of town gossip. She is befriended by Gilbert Markham, who at first is received very coldly by Helen, but he is persistent and wins her trust. It becomes clear that Gilbert has developed intimate feelings for Helen, and although we can guess that she feels the same for him, she is determined to convince him that this is not a proper match. So she gives Gilbert her diary, which vividly details her abusive marriage to Arthur Huntington, an alcoholic and debaucher. Although this may sound like a depressing topic (which it is), Bronte¿s talent is what makes the book so absorbing and satisfying. She incorporates all the necessary ingredients to sufficiently whet your appetite, (romance, suspense, and a plethora of plot twists and turns) and provides a very satisfying, albeit, surprise ending. This is a book I will read again and again. It is a real treasure. By the way, I was told that the Oxfords Classics edition is the best one to buy. It contains a preface by Ann Bronte and the letter to J. Halford Esq. in the beginning, instead of just starting with Chapter One ('You must go back with me'). These were in Anne's original text, and in my opinion, add quite a bit to the entire work. Highly recommended, especially for book clubs. Cris

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted November 8, 2013

    Much better than Jane Eyre or Wuthering Heights. It's a shame t

    Much better than Jane Eyre or Wuthering Heights. It's a shame that Anne Bronte is not as well known as her sisters, Charolotte and Emily. I find her writing to be much less verbose and much easier to follow. Both this book and her previous book, Agnes Grey, are well written and engage the reader in the story and the characters. I felt like I got to know the characters much better than in Jane Eyre. If you must pick a Bronte sister, go with Anne Bronte and save the others for when you have absolutely nothing else to read. This book got a little "preachy" at times, but it is not overwhelmingly so. Maybe the subject matter was shocking at the time of the original publication, but certainly not in today's society. In fact, I thought it handled the subject matter very well and gave an insider's look at what it is like to love someone who is determined to destroy themselves.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 14, 2010

    Ahead of its time

    In the introduction to this book the comment is made that if it had not been for the other two Brontes, no one would be reading this book today. I have to disagree.

    This book has a few issues (mostly there is some confusion about who the narrator is writing to ( a friend but if he is married to the narrators sister, why does the narrator mention his sister got married?) and why he has gone into the narrative in the first place), but the characters and the plot make it easy to overlook the issues.

    The themes covered in this book are relevant today.
    It covers the difference between love and infatuation, the effects substance abuse has on families, the courage born from the duty to protect ones child, and in short the refusal to be anyones victim.

    I felt we got to know the tenant of wildfell hall and observed through her actions and thoughts that she was remarkable and admirable, as opposed to being told by the author that she was such. It was as if we got to understand her, know her and like her they way the narrator did.

    She was a woman who had many reasons to be small - if she had let the cruel treatment of others, and her lifes disappointments change her. Instead she was remarkable by staying true to herself and to her moral compass. The circumstances in this womans life ,at a time when women had so little empowerment , were the makings of a tragedy. Instead we find a story and a character that was ahead of its time.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 20, 2007

    A reviewer

    The Tenant of Wildfell Hall is one of the most amazing books I have ever read. The themes of this book are, in some ways, more powerful than either Jane Eyre or Wuthering Heights. Helen Huntington has to be one of the most controversial Victorian heroines written of. Her struggles are the one's that most books from this era brush over. This book shows the dark side of life in the nineteenth century, something you will never find in a Jane Austen novel. Everyone should read this!!!!

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 19, 2001

    THE BEST BRONTE SISTER!

    I have been a fan of the 3 Bronte sisters for more than a year now. I found Charlotte to be an adequet writer, but when I read The Tenant of Wildfell Hall, I knew I had found the best sister of all. Ann Bronte is the one whom little is known about, but she is definately the best writer, towering over her sisters with her masterpiece that I found so engrossing. The Tenant of Wildfell Hall was absolutely incredible, portraying evil being conquered by true love, and finishing with the happiest ending ever!

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 2, 2013

    I Also Recommend:

    Exciting novel, one of my favourites, with a strong-willed main

    Exciting novel, one of my favourites, with a strong-willed main heroine and her wonderful story. "The Tenant" was praised before me, so I will write here only about this edition of it.
    1. The only good thing in this edition is an introduction by Dr. Lutz. Very helpful, well-written and informative.
    2. With exception of the aforementioned introduction this is copy of Progect Gutenberg edition which in its turn a copy of 1920 copy of 1900 edition of "The Tenant".
    3. It's an incomplete edition (see Wikipedia for more information about mutilated editions of "The Tenant"). The Prologue, some parts of the text and chapter headings are omitted. Complete novel begins with: "Dear Halford, when we were together last..."
    4. There is stupid out-dated and out of place introduction by M.A. Ward, sometime a renown anti-feminist writer. "The Tenant" is clearly a feminist novel, and you may guess what did she write about Anne and her novel. Ward's criticism is absolutely unjust.
    Below in my recommendations I've added the editions of "The Tenant" which I know to be complete. If you want to read the novel in its best, buy one of this editions.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted October 6, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    What a great read - Anne Bronte is the Best!

    I loved this book, it aroused all sorts of emotions in me. Set in the Victorian Era the heroine Helen Huntington Graham could easily be transported to today. Helen angered/frustrated me, puzzeled me and touched my sympathy as did other major characters in the book. It was fun to retire to my modern day garden, read this book and be transported to the Victorian era. It challenged me to think what could have informed Anne Bronte at such a young age and during her time in history of the themes of which she wrote: sextual inequality, feminism, domestic abuse, alcohol/drug addiction, marital infidelity. As I researched this I learned she saw and lived much of it within her own family. Anne earned her place as the best of the Bronte writers.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 26, 2002

    Anne was a genius, and her book is a treasure

    I loved this book, and cannot understand why Anne Bronte has been so neglected, pushed back back behind her older sisters. I love most of Charlotte's books as well, but The Tenant of Wildfell Hall is my favorite. It is so well written, and so engrossing, that the closer I came to the end, the slower I read, for fear that it would be over.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted September 15, 2013

    Highly Recommended--the best of the Brontes!

    This is an amazing Gothic story. It is well-written with an intriguing plot and interesting sub-plots.

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  • Posted August 23, 2011

    Recommend

    Anne Bronte chooses to illustrate the truth of man's nature. That it is foolish to think that we can change a person, and that there will be some who never make right choices for themself.

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  • Posted February 8, 2011

    slow start, but then a DELIGHT

    Slow to suck you in, but great character development and intense storyline. With less gothic tones than either of her sisters, Anne writes very realistically...even shockingly for the day. Smacks you in the face!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 23, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted May 10, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted June 24, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted December 11, 2008

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted February 14, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

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