The Testosterone Advantage Plan: Lose Weight, Gain Muscle, Boost Energy

Overview

For years now, the so-called experts have told you to avoid the foods you love. That you're supposed to ditch the weight room and jog your way to maximum fitness. And that testosterone -- the hormone that makes you a man -- is actually a problem for you, rather than the solution to your problems. In the meantime, American men have kept getting fatter and more frustrated. Which is why we've looked into all this, and from what we've learned, we can tell you -- the know-it-alls are...
See more details below
Available through our Marketplace sellers.
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (52) from $1.99   
  • New (3) from $4.80   
  • Used (49) from $1.99   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Note: Marketplace items are not eligible for any BN.com coupons and promotions
$4.80
Seller since 2014

Feedback rating:

(109)

Condition:

New — never opened or used in original packaging.

Like New — packaging may have been opened. A "Like New" item is suitable to give as a gift.

Very Good — may have minor signs of wear on packaging but item works perfectly and has no damage.

Good — item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Acceptable — item is in working order but may show signs of wear such as scratches or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Used — An item that has been opened and may show signs of wear. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Refurbished — A used item that has been renewed or updated and verified to be in proper working condition. Not necessarily completed by the original manufacturer.

New
New New condition. Free track! Fast shipping! Satisfication guaranteed!

Ships from: Media, PA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$7.49
Seller since 2010

Feedback rating:

(156)

Condition: New
Excellent condition. Interior is tight, bright and clean. Missing original paper dust cover. Not a gift book but a wonderful reading copy. A few pages were lightly creased. 100% ... Satisfaction Guaranteed. All items are carefully enclosed with bubble wrap. We ship promptly and worldwide via US Post and will email you a tracking number. Read more Show Less

Ships from: Emigrant, MT

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$30.00
Seller since 2007

Feedback rating:

(7)

Condition: New
*Usually SHIPS WITHIN 24HRS Mon-Sat, except holidays carefully packed. Follow up e-mail with USPS Delivery Confirmation or USPS Customs Declaration Form Number when shipped. *WE ... WELCOME ORDERS FROM NEW INTERNATIONAL BUYERS! Read more Show Less

Ships from: Fairport, NY

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Close
Sort by
Sending request ...

Overview

For years now, the so-called experts have told you to avoid the foods you love. That you're supposed to ditch the weight room and jog your way to maximum fitness. And that testosterone -- the hormone that makes you a man -- is actually a problem for you, rather than the solution to your problems. In the meantime, American men have kept getting fatter and more frustrated. Which is why we've looked into all this, and from what we've learned, we can tell you -- the know-it-alls are know-nothings.
Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble
Advocates of low-fat, high-carbohydrate diets and aerobic exercise for men receive their comeuppance in Lou Schuler's The Testosterone Advantage Plan. According to Schuler and his three coauthors, men need fat: In fact, between 30 to 40 percent of a male's caloric intake should come from fat. Why? Because dietary fat is needed to produce testosterone, which helps guys build muscle and lose flab. Utilizing recent hormone research and the results of his own pilot program, the fitness editor of Men's Health magazine explains how you can have your trim tummy and your sirloin too.
Library Journal
If you can plow your way past the chest thumping here, you'll find that this nine-week plan for men is actually a Mediterranean diet, modified with increased animal protein and low glycemic carbohydrates on a three-meal, two-snack daily eating plan, combined with strength training. Lacking are recently revised guidelines on lower triglyceride levels, saturated fat percentages, and increased daily total fat allowances. The authors also slam programs recommending aerobics for weight loss when most, in fact, have been emphasizing strength training for many years. However, more than 100 pages of well-illustrated exercises at three levels are included, as are sample menus and shopping lists. Definitely a guy's guide, from contributors to Men's Health magazine. Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.
From the Publisher
Susan M. Kleiner, R.D., Ph.D. author of Power Eating The more we learn about hormonal control of the body, the more we understand that there's almost nothing physiologically the same between men and women. The Testosterone Advantage Plan, written just for men, promotes scientifically based approaches to fat loss and muscle gain.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781579545079
  • Publisher: Rodale Press, Inc.
  • Publication date: 2/12/2002
  • Edition description: REV
  • Pages: 368
  • Product dimensions: 6.52 (w) x 9.48 (h) x 1.02 (d)

Meet the Author

Lou Schuler and Adam Campbell are, respectively, fitness editor and health and nutrition editor at Men's Health magazine, the world's leading men's fitness magazine.

Read More Show Less

Read an Excerpt

Chapter 1: Our Burgers, Ourselves

Are you a man who's interested in looking his best? Being his best? Staying physically and physiologically at the top of his game?

We feel for you. We really do.

That's because you've been overlooked. And you've been misled. For 20 years, the fitness and weight-loss industries have had little to offer you. For 20 years, you've been overfed but undernourished. Overworked but underexercised. Overanalyzed but still misunderstood.

Along the way, well-meaning people — often with impressive credentials — have tried to help you. They began by steering you away from the foods you enjoy. When you didn't take an immediate liking to the foods they wanted you to eat instead, other friendly folks in the packaged-food business stepped up with better-tasting versions. When the more palatable food made you fat, yet another group of sincere individuals chimed in to show you a type of exercise that helped you lose some of the fat — but also caused your body to lose a lot of its muscle and your joints to cry out in protest.

At the end of it all, not only are you still out of shape but now you have weak, arthritic knees.

Why? Because all those wonderful diets and fitness programs you were given don't work.

Not for you. Not for most men.

You're going to be exposed to a lot of eyebrow-raising notions in this book. We'll tell you that the Food Guide Pyramid doesn't work for us men. A low-fat, high-carbohydrate diet doesn't work for us. (Except, maybe, for the marathoners among us. For the rest of the male population, a low-calorie diet consisting mostly of carbs is a metabolic and physiological disaster waiting to happen.) Most forms of aerobic exercise don't work for us. For that matter, even weight lifting, as you were traditionally taught it — "Grab X number of pounds, lift 10 times, do three sets, repeat" — doesn't work. Not the way it's supposed to.

On what do we base such bold assertions? For starters, decades after the American Heart Association and other leading voices began singing the praises of "low fat" and "exercise," the average guy is more out of shape than his 1960s predecessor. Between 1960 and 1994, the percentage of obese men leaped from 10.4 to 19.9 percent of the total U.S. male population, according to the National Center for Health Statistics.

Sounds pretty bad? Some estimates are worse. Indeed, the latest government statistics tell us that more than half of all Americans are now overweight.

Frankly, we're angry about all this. We're angry with the nutrition establishment, which bullied us into eating less fat, less protein, and much, much more carbohydrate. This much-ballyhooed dietary template has made us fatter than ever before, slowing our metabolisms and screwing with our hormones — specifically, our testosterone.

We're angry with the food industry, which has co-opted the low-fat paradigm and drained whatever virtue it may have contained, replacing fat with sugar and giving us foods we can't stop eating, despite the fact that they never fill us up.

And we're angry with the exercise movement, which decided early on that "fitness" meant "aerobic exercise" and pushed a gullible public into pursuing workout routines that were fine for keeping skinny people skinny but did surprisingly little for the emerging overweight majority.

None of this had to happen. There's a better way to eat and a better way to exercise.

We're going to present a new paradigm. We're going to present a diet that's based on the healthiest nutritional model in the world, a diet that will allow you to eat less but feel as if you've eaten more, a diet that will increase your metabolism and boost your testosterone. We're going to show you a workout program that will build muscle, further increase your metabolism, and introduce you to the lean, vital man you want to be.

INFLATIONARY TRENDS

We live a lifestyle that's almost designed to make us fat, in a world that's determined to help things along in any way possible. Increasing numbers of us sit in front of computers all day, then go home and sit in front of TVs till bedtime. The Sporting Goods Manufacturers Association tells us that just 20.5 percent of Americans exercised three or more times a week in 1999. Meanwhile, we go out for dinner and manage to pack away 1,000 or more calories before the main course arrives. (Ever share one of those deep-fried onion-wedge appetizers with a buddy or a girlfriend? With the dipping sauce, that's more than 1,000 calories right there. For each of you. There's a difference between "eating more fat" and "eating humongous quantities of crap." All this will become clearer as we move along.) We're drowning in "value meals," offers of two pepperoni pizzas for the price of one, and other incentives to stuff ourselves to the point of self-loathing.

But that alone isn't the problem — or at least, it's not the sole problem. Because guess what? "Eating right" isn't the answer, either. Not the way you were taught to do it, growing up.

At this point we'd like to lay out for you four simple, straightforward truths that will occupy us for the rest of this book.

Fact One: Low-fat diets lower testosterone, making it harder to build muscle and easier to store fat.

Fact Two: Aerobic exercise programs make it still harder to build muscle. Not only is there no muscle-building stimulus, there are actually muscle-eroding physiological shifts associated with serious endurance exercise. And it's hard on the joints to boot.

Fact Three: Less muscle means a slower metabolism — which means still more fat down the road.

Fact Four: Since weight training can enhance the structural integrity of joints and connective tissues — rather than wear them down — it stands to reason that it should be the first exercise choice for men.

So what happened here? How did we get so far removed from the kind of diet-and-exercise regimen that really works for men?

Let's go back to the Food Guide Pyramid for a moment. In 1980, the U.S. government formalized a series of Dietary Guidelines that were themselves an outgrowth of the "four food groups" model that began to take hold during the 1950s. The Food Guide Pyramid was created in 1992 and added to the Dietary Guidelines in 1995 as a teaching tool to illustrate the number of servings that you should eat from each food group. Today, the main USDA mantra is "Let the pyramid guide your food choices." Basically, it emphasizes large amounts of carbohydrate (the so-called healthy base of the pyramid), somewhat smaller amounts of fruits and vegetables, even smaller amounts of protein, and very, very small amounts of fat. It bears noting that the final shaping and composition of the pyramid was not exactly a scientifically pristine process, as many groups (including the meat and dairy industries) lobbied the USDA as well as the Department of Health and Human Services to protect their interests in the matter.r

Nonetheless, even if we take the Food Guide Pyramid at face value, there are so many errors and inconsistencies as to make it functionally worthless as a tool for governing our dietary choices.

For starters, while the pyramid sets forth a fairly straightforward account of the relative amounts we should be eating from the major food groups, it makes no distinctions among the legitimate subcategories that exist within each group. For instance, in the pyramid, grains are grains, whether you're talking about a hearty bowl of old-fashioned oatmeal or a nutritionally worthless slice of white bread — and despite the huge differences in the nutritional and metabolic values of whole grain and refined flour (vitamin enrichment aside).

In the same way, though the Food Guide Pyramid does not specifically mention proteins by name, it lumps most types of protein-based foods in the same group, even though nutritionists say animal proteins (like the burgers we love) are a more complete form of protein than vegetable proteins in their ability to provide B vitamins and essential amino acids. Neither does the pyramid take into account the fact that there's a world of difference between a helping of salmon, which is rich in heart-healthy omega-3 oils, and a helping of bologna, which is rich in not very much. Just as bad — maybe even worse, for our purposes — all fats are imprisoned together in a tiny cell at the top (and remember, in the pyramid, the higher you go, the less desirable a food supposedly is). As a final insult, the sweets are also thrown right in there with the fats. Thus, in the maddeningly simplistic hierarchy of government-sponsored eating, healthy fats like olive and fish oils are equal partners with doughnuts and DingDongs.

Now and then, you'll hear the pyramid's defenders point to the declining death rate from heart disease as evidence that the pyramid is paying dividends. To this we reply: Nonsense. To credit the pyramid alone with the drop in cardiac mortality is to ignore the major advances in cardiac surgery and drug therapy over the past few decades. That's an omission bordering on fraud. And ask yourself this: If the Food Guide Pyramid were really making Americans healthier, wouldn't it also be making them thinner? In other words, if the pyramid is responsible for declining cardiac death rates, that must mean an awful lot of people are using it to plan their meals. But if that's the case — and if the pyramid actually does what it says it does — then why the hell is America so fat? No less a bastion of conventional thought than the Harvard School of Public Health itself conceded, in a study reported in the November 2000 American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, that the pyramid was "only weakly associated" with a lessened risk of major diseases like heart attack and cancer.

Others claim that the real problem here is compliance, that when you come right down to it, not that many people follow the pyramid's recommendations after all. Fair enough — but such a contention, if true, completely undercuts any claims about the pyramid's positive effects on American health. How could the pyramid be uplifting the face of heart health if nobody really pays attention to it?

So we don't buy the noncompliance alibi for a minute. And if you're married, you don't either. You know from experience that your wife is constantly trying to get you to eat "better," to attempt to follow the nutrition establishment's guidelines.

To us, this prompts the core issue in this entire debate: whether anybody — particularly an active man — should try to eat like that as a way of life.

We're not lone voices in the wilderness, by the way. The American Heart Association, the Harvard School of Public Health, and the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine, to name just three, have advocated rethinking the pyramid, to some degree, with a goal toward less simplicity and more realism.

We, on the other hand, would rather see the pyramid junked than refined. Since we know it doesn't work, rejiggering it will only leave people more confused than ever. In its place, we'd like to suggest the Men's Health T. Our T, as you may have guessed, stands for testosterone. That's because our diet increases your testosterone by increasing your intake of healthy fat. For the simple fact is: Today's ultra low fat diets are detrimental to us as men.

See, dietary fats don't spend all their time clogging your arteries. Fat cells are a major energy source for vital organs, your heart included. They're the principal carriers and bodily repositories of the all-important fat-soluble vitamins A, D, E, and K, which are stored in fatty tissues and the liver until needed.

But more to the point of this book, in men, they also play a key role in triggering testosterone production. For that reason, we think your diet should include at least 30 percent fat, and perhaps as much as 40 percent.

Of course, if you've been paying attention the past few dozen years, you've heard that 30 percent fat is the maximum a health-conscious person should eat and that we'd all be better off with less than 20 percent. We hope to convince you that such a diet is a nutritional and metabolic disaster for men. And we want you to at least give our higher-fat diet a try. Even without our muscle-building, testosterone-boosting workout plan, the diet should leave you looking lean but never feeling hungry — a hell of a combination in these overinflated times.

You'll get the best results, however, when you combine the diet with the workout plan: Each works fine on its own, but the two create a beautiful synergy in tandem. We learned this from the 16 men who completed our 9-week pilot program. You'll meet some of them throughout the book, in the "Before & After" profiles.

First, however, we'd like you to join us in a little visualization exercise.

FIT OR MISFIT?

Picture two Olympic athletes. Both are extremely lean, with body-fat percentages in the low single digits. One guy's body is exactly what you'd visualize when you read the words Olympic and athlete in the same sentence: broad shoulders, narrow waist, thick arms, legs that look like they could kick a football 90 yards and catch up to it before it hit the ground. The other looks as if he were in the final stages of a tragic illness. You want to feed him, but you're not sure he could keep anything down.

As you've probably guessed, the first athlete is a sprinter, a man who never does traditional aerobic exercise and might not be able to run a mile without breaking it up into four quarter-mile dashes. The second is a marathoner, a guy who does nothing but aerobic exercise and might not be able to complete a single chinup or bench-press half his weight.

Of these two guys — one who appears to be ready to keel over, the other who looks like he had sex five times before breakfast — which one would you consider "fit"?

Easy question. Too easy. But we ask it for a reason. If you didn't have visual descriptions, if all you knew about these two guys were their aerobic-fitness levels, you would've said the gaunt marathoner was the most fit of the two.

And that's the crux of the problem we have with fitness as it's peddled in America. Given a choice, you'd rather look like the sprinter. And you're pretty sure the women you know would rather sleep with the sprinter. (What woman wants a guy who's skinnier than she is?) But the American fitness establishment wants you to train like the marathoner.

Oh, here's one more image to keep in mind, about the very origins of the word marathoner: According to legend, when the Greeks defeated the Persians in the battle of Marathon in 490 b.c., a runner named Pheidippides was dispatched to carry the good news back to Athens. At the end of his 22-mile journey, he reportedly shouted, "Rejoice! We conquer!"

And then he died of exhaustion.

THE BODY YOU WANT, IN THE TIME YOU HAVE

Traditional weight-control theory has given the chunky flunky three options: Eat fewer calories or burn more or some combination thereof.

Burning more calories is usually thought of as an active process, like jogging, lifting weights, or yanking your daughter out of some teenage Romeo's Mustang. But the majority of the calories you burn throughout the day are controlled by your basal metabolism. These are the calories your body burns whether you're active or not, whether you're sleeping or eating, whether you're thinking about sex or actually having some. Your body burns these calories to provide fuel for your brain, your heart, your other organs; to keep your muscles and other moving parts prepared for action.

Your body burns about 10 percent of its calories by digesting the food you eat, which is called the thermic effect of feeding. Thermic is a great word to remember, because it reminds you that your body is just one skin-wrapped furnace and that the food you eat is the fuel you feed your furnace.

The other — and most variable — way in which you burn calories is through voluntary activity. Exercising, playing with the kids, working in the yard, walking to the john — every move you make expends more calories than you would burn by just sitting still. Physical activity accounts for anywhere from 10 to 30 percent of the energy your body uses each day.

So let's review: Your body has three mechanisms for burning calories. Two of them you don't think about, because basal metabolism and the thermic effect of feeding are invisible to you. And yet, those two account for 70 to 90 percent of the fuel you burn each day. So it makes sense that the best way to control body weight is to ramp up those two systems. Build muscle, and you increase your metabolism by up to 50 calories a day per pound of muscle. Eat more protein, and you crank up the thermic effect by as much as one-third. (We'll do the math in chapter 6.) In effect, you achieve truly metabolic weight control: Fat burning that hums along on its own even as you sit or sleep or just stew about pulling your daughter out of some teenage Romeo's Mustang.

So what does the current paradigm for exercise and nutrition offer you? Exercise routines that not only fail to build more metabolism-boosting muscle but also reduce the muscle you already have. And diet programs that not only fail to take advantage of the thermic effect of protein but also lower your muscle-building testosterone by reducing the fat that provides the building blocks for your manliest hormone. This is the equivalent of sending soldiers into battle without bullets in their guns.

The one effective weapon the established guidelines do give you is activity. We agree that activity is important, and all of the authors of this book have a lifelong passion for strenuous exercise. But we have to admit that increasing activity is the slowest, most frustrating way to lose weight.

THE SPEED BURNERS

What we're going to give you in this book is the fastest, most surefire way to lose fat, gain muscle, restore your body to its natural athletic shape, and reinforce your vital male essence. The key is to tap naturally into your body's supply of testosterone, the male hormone that, to varying degrees, governs musculature, height, bone density, sexual function, and a host of other elements that are of critical importance to men.

You also need to know as much as possible about regulating other key self-made chemicals, like growth hormone and cortisol.

Our premise is simple: We've taken everything we now know about naturally boosting hormone levels and organized that information into a comprehensive eating-and-workout plan that you can put into effect on an individualized basis. Testosterone helps you maximize your muscle mass and mobilize fat for energy — in short, it helps you get the most out of your workouts. And if you follow our plan religiously — doing the right exercises in the right combinations at the right times — you'll spur your body's production of additional testosterone that will enable you to work out harder and longer and will aid your muscles in recovery and growth.

In a nutshell, the Testosterone Advantage Plan will allow you to adjust your body composition in order to meet your personal goals. You may want to drop 10 pounds of fat from around your waist. Or you may want to gain 10 pounds of muscle on your arms, legs, and chest. Whatever your specific goals are, we think that we can help you achieve them in a way that's impossible to do with any of those one-size-fits-all diets.

Are you going to miraculously transform yourself into one of those hulking figures you see on the cover of Muscle & Fitness magazine? No. Those guys have to commit their lives to looking that way. And many of them — probably most of them — are able to achieve their results only by injecting synthetic substances into their bodies. (Besides, research has shown that women don't necessarily lust after those types of bodies anyway. They prefer a lean, muscular look to a superhuman torso.)

But will the Testosterone Advantage Plan make you look better and feel better? Yes. Are you going to become the best you that you can be? We like to think so. And we're supported in this conviction by cutting-edge scientific research as well as the results of our own pilot program.

Although some of our concepts have been practiced in the world of bodybuilding for decades, the science underlying our plan is just starting to gain acceptance in the halls of academia. And when we say "academia," we're not talking about Hercules Tech. For example, the Harvard School of Public Health has conducted one of several major studies whose findings suggest that a high-fat, low-fiber diet raises testosterone levels.

We've organized these landmark insights into a simple 9-week plan, and we're confident that if you put it to work for you, you'll not only look and feel better but also become stronger than you've ever been and leaner than you've been since the days when you didn't even realize that it was a good shape to be in. Though your metamorphosis won't exactly be instant, you'll start getting measurably stronger after the first few workouts. Within 4 weeks, your body will start making important molecular adaptations that set the stage for gains in muscle size. After that, you could see muscle growth of 20 to 40 percent. Granted, those gains won't all happen in 9 weeks, but the foundation you build with this program will put you on the straightest, surest path to that destination.

And the best part of our program: You'll get to eat like a man and look like a god.

We believe we're ushering in an exciting new era in weight management for men. We're inviting you to join us on the frontier.

Copyright © 2002 by Rodale Inc.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments xiii
Introduction xv
Part 1
Chapter 1 Our Burgers, Ourselves 3
Chapter 2 Why Almost Everything You Know about Fitness Is Probably Dead Wrong 21
Chapter 3 The Cardio Conundrum 31
Chapter 4 Testosterone: A Man's Key to Getting and Staying Fit 45
Part 2
Chapter 5 The Men's Health T 57
Chapter 6 The Meat/Muscle Connection 61
Chapter 7 The Manly Fats 77
Chapter 8 Carbohydrate Revisited 88
Chapter 9 Putting Together the Food Plan 94
Chapter 10 When You Eat, and Why It Matters 105
Chapter 11 The 1-Week Meal Planner 114
Part 3
Chapter 12 Introduction to the Testosterone Advantage Workout 155
Chapter 13 Getting Ready to Lift 166
Chapter 14 The Testosterone Advantage Workout: Phase 1 198
Chapter 15 The Testosterone Advantage Workout: Phase 2 226
Chapter 16 The Testosterone Advantage Workout: Phase 3 256
Chapter 17 Life at the Top 285
About the Authors 295
Index 297
Read More Show Less

First Chapter

Chapter 1: Our Burgers, Ourselves

Are you a man who's interested in looking his best? Being his best? Staying physically and physiologically at the top of his game?

We feel for you. We really do.

That's because you've been overlooked. And you've been misled. For 20 years, the fitness and weight-loss industries have had little to offer you. For 20 years, you've been overfed but undernourished. Overworked but underexercised. Overanalyzed but still misunderstood.

Along the way, well-meaning people -- often with impressive credentials -- have tried to help you. They began by steering you away from the foods you enjoy. When you didn't take an immediate liking to the foods they wanted you to eat instead, other friendly folks in the packaged-food business stepped up with better-tasting versions. When the more palatable food made you fat, yet another group of sincere individuals chimed in to show you a type of exercise that helped you lose some of the fat -- but also caused your body to lose a lot of its muscle and your joints to cry out in protest.

At the end of it all, not only are you still out of shape but now you have weak, arthritic knees.

Why? Because all those wonderful diets and fitness programs you were given don't work.

Not for you. Not for most men.

You're going to be exposed to a lot of eyebrow-raising notions in this book. We'll tell you that the Food Guide Pyramid doesn't work for us men. A low-fat, high-carbohydrate diet doesn't work for us. (Except, maybe, for the marathoners among us. For the rest of the male population, a low-calorie dietconsisting mostly of carbs is a metabolic and physiological disaster waiting to happen.) Most forms of aerobic exercise don't work for us. For that matter, even weight lifting, as you were traditionally taught it -- "Grab X number of pounds, lift 10 times, do three sets, repeat" -- doesn't work. Not the way it's supposed to.

On what do we base such bold assertions? For starters, decades after the American Heart Association and other leading voices began singing the praises of "low fat" and "exercise," the average guy is more out of shape than his 1960s predecessor. Between 1960 and 1994, the percentage of obese men leaped from 10.4 to 19.9 percent of the total U.S. male population, according to the National Center for Health Statistics.

Sounds pretty bad? Some estimates are worse. Indeed, the latest government statistics tell us that more than half of all Americans are now overweight.

Frankly, we're angry about all this. We're angry with the nutrition establishment, which bullied us into eating less fat, less protein, and much, much more carbohydrate. This much-ballyhooed dietary template has made us fatter than ever before, slowing our metabolisms and screwing with our hormones -- specifically, our testosterone.

We're angry with the food industry, which has co-opted the low-fat paradigm and drained whatever virtue it may have contained, replacing fat with sugar and giving us foods we can't stop eating, despite the fact that they never fill us up.

And we're angry with the exercise movement, which decided early on that "fitness" meant "aerobic exercise" and pushed a gullible public into pursuing workout routines that were fine for keeping skinny people skinny but did surprisingly little for the emerging overweight majority.

None of this had to happen. There's a better way to eat and a better way to exercise.

We're going to present a new paradigm. We're going to present a diet that's based on the healthiest nutritional model in the world, a diet that will allow you to eat less but feel as if you've eaten more, a diet that will increase your metabolism and boost your testosterone. We're going to show you a workout program that will build muscle, further increase your metabolism, and introduce you to the lean, vital man you want to be.

INFLATIONARY TRENDS

We live a lifestyle that's almost designed to make us fat, in a world that's determined to help things along in any way possible. Increasing numbers of us sit in front of computers all day, then go home and sit in front of TVs till bedtime. The Sporting Goods Manufacturers Association tells us that just 20.5 percent of Americans exercised three or more times a week in 1999. Meanwhile, we go out for dinner and manage to pack away 1,000 or more calories before the main course arrives. (Ever share one of those deep-fried onion-wedge appetizers with a buddy or a girlfriend? With the dipping sauce, that's more than 1,000 calories right there. For each of you. There's a difference between "eating more fat" and "eating humongous quantities of crap." All this will become clearer as we move along.) We're drowning in "value meals," offers of two pepperoni pizzas for the price of one, and other incentives to stuff ourselves to the point of self-loathing.

But that alone isn't the problem -- or at least, it's not the sole problem. Because guess what? "Eating right" isn't the answer, either. Not the way you were taught to do it, growing up.

At this point we'd like to lay out for you four simple, straightforward truths that will occupy us for the rest of this book.

Fact One: Low-fat diets lower testosterone, making it harder to build muscle and easier to store fat.

Fact Two: Aerobic exercise programs make it still harder to build muscle. Not only is there no muscle-building stimulus, there are actually muscle-eroding physiological shifts associated with serious endurance exercise. And it's hard on the joints to boot.

Fact Three: Less muscle means a slower metabolism -- which means still more fat down the road.

Fact Four: Since weight training can enhance the structural integrity of joints and connective tissues -- rather than wear them down -- it stands to reason that it should be the first exercise choice for men.

So what happened here? How did we get so far removed from the kind of diet-and-exercise regimen that really works for men?

Let's go back to the Food Guide Pyramid for a moment. In 1980, the U.S. government formalized a series of Dietary Guidelines that were themselves an outgrowth of the "four food groups" model that began to take hold during the 1950s. The Food Guide Pyramid was created in 1992 and added to the Dietary Guidelines in 1995 as a teaching tool to illustrate the number of servings that you should eat from each food group. Today, the main USDA mantra is "Let the pyramid guide your food choices." Basically, it emphasizes large amounts of carbohydrate (the so-called healthy base of the pyramid), somewhat smaller amounts of fruits and vegetables, even smaller amounts of protein, and very, very small amounts of fat. It bears noting that the final shaping and composition of the pyramid was not exactly a scientifically pristine process, as many groups (including the meat and dairy industries) lobbied the USDA as well as the Department of Health and Human Services to protect their interests in the matter.

Nonetheless, even if we take the Food Guide Pyramid at face value, there are so many errors and inconsistencies as to make it functionally worthless as a tool for governing our dietary choices.

For starters, while the pyramid sets forth a fairly straightforward account of the relative amounts we should be eating from the major food groups, it makes no distinctions among the legitimate subcategories that exist within each group. For instance, in the pyramid, grains are grains, whether you're talking about a hearty bowl of old-fashioned oatmeal or a nutritionally worthless slice of white bread -- and despite the huge differences in the nutritional and metabolic values of whole grain and refined flour (vitamin enrichment aside).

In the same way, though the Food Guide Pyramid does not specifically mention proteins by name, it lumps most types of protein-based foods in the same group, even though nutritionists say animal proteins (like the burgers we love) are a more complete form of protein than vegetable proteins in their ability to provide B vitamins and essential amino acids. Neither does the pyramid take into account the fact that there's a world of difference between a helping of salmon, which is rich in heart-healthy omega-3 oils, and a helping of bologna, which is rich in not very much. Just as bad -- maybe even worse, for our purposes -- all fats are imprisoned together in a tiny cell at the top (and remember, in the pyramid, the higher you go, the less desirable a food supposedly is). As a final insult, the sweets are also thrown right in there with the fats. Thus, in the maddeningly simplistic hierarchy of government-sponsored eating, healthy fats like olive and fish oils are equal partners with doughnuts and DingDongs.

Now and then, you'll hear the pyramid's defenders point to the declining death rate from heart disease as evidence that the pyramid is paying dividends. To this we reply: Nonsense. To credit the pyramid alone with the drop in cardiac mortality is to ignore the major advances in cardiac surgery and drug therapy over the past few decades. That's an omission bordering on fraud. And ask yourself this: If the Food Guide Pyramid were really making Americans healthier, wouldn't it also be making them thinner? In other words, if the pyramid is responsible for declining cardiac death rates, that must mean an awful lot of people are using it to plan their meals. But if that's the case -- and if the pyramid actually does what it says it does -- then why the hell is America so fat? No less a bastion of conventional thought than the Harvard School of Public Health itself conceded, in a study reported in the November 2000 American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, that the pyramid was "only weakly associated" with a lessened risk of major diseases like heart attack and cancer.

Others claim that the real problem here is compliance, that when you come right down to it, not that many people follow the pyramid's recommendations after all. Fair enough -- but such a contention, if true, completely undercuts any claims about the pyramid's positive effects on American health. How could the pyramid be uplifting the face of heart health if nobody really pays attention to it?

So we don't buy the noncompliance alibi for a minute. And if you're married, you don't either. You know from experience that your wife is constantly trying to get you to eat "better," to attempt to follow the nutrition establishment's guidelines.

To us, this prompts the core issue in this entire debate: whether anybody -- particularly an active man -- should try to eat like that as a way of life.

We're not lone voices in the wilderness, by the way. The American Heart Association, the Harvard School of Public Health, and the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine, to name just three, have advocated rethinking the pyramid, to some degree, with a goal toward less simplicity and more realism.

We, on the other hand, would rather see the pyramid junked than refined. Since we know it doesn't work, rejiggering it will only leave people more confused than ever. In its place, we'd like to suggest the Men's Health T. Our T, as you may have guessed, stands for testosterone. That's because our diet increases your testosterone by increasing your intake of healthy fat. For the simple fact is: Today's ultra low fat diets are detrimental to us as men.

See, dietary fats don't spend all their time clogging your arteries. Fat cells are a major energy source for vital organs, your heart included. They're the principal carriers and bodily repositories of the all-important fat-soluble vitamins A, D, E, and K, which are stored in fatty tissues and the liver until needed.

But more to the point of this book, in men, they also play a key role in triggering testosterone production. For that reason, we think your diet should include at least 30 percent fat, and perhaps as much as 40 percent.

Of course, if you've been paying attention the past few dozen years, you've heard that 30 percent fat is the maximum a health-conscious person should eat and that we'd all be better off with less than 20 percent. We hope to convince you that such a diet is a nutritional and metabolic disaster for men. And we want you to at least give our higher-fat diet a try. Even without our muscle-building, testosterone-boosting workout plan, the diet should leave you looking lean but never feeling hungry -- a hell of a combination in these overinflated times.

You'll get the best results, however, when you combine the diet with the workout plan: Each works fine on its own, but the two create a beautiful synergy in tandem. We learned this from the 16 men who completed our 9-week pilot program. You'll meet some of them throughout the book, in the "Before & After" profiles.

First, however, we'd like you to join us in a little visualization exercise.

FIT OR MISFIT?

Picture two Olympic athletes. Both are extremely lean, with body-fat percentages in the low single digits. One guy's body is exactly what you'd visualize when you read the words Olympic and athlete in the same sentence: broad shoulders, narrow waist, thick arms, legs that look like they could kick a football 90 yards and catch up to it before it hit the ground. The other looks as if he were in the final stages of a tragic illness. You want to feed him, but you're not sure he could keep anything down.

As you've probably guessed, the first athlete is a sprinter, a man who never does traditional aerobic exercise and might not be able to run a mile without breaking it up into four quarter-mile dashes. The second is a marathoner, a guy who does nothing but aerobic exercise and might not be able to complete a single chinup or bench-press half his weight.

Of these two guys -- one who appears to be ready to keel over, the other who looks like he had sex five times before breakfast -- which one would you consider "fit"?

Easy question. Too easy. But we ask it for a reason. If you didn't have visual descriptions, if all you knew about these two guys were their aerobic-fitness levels, you would've said the gaunt marathoner was the most fit of the two.

And that's the crux of the problem we have with fitness as it's peddled in America. Given a choice, you'd rather look like the sprinter. And you're pretty sure the women you know would rather sleep with the sprinter. (What woman wants a guy who's skinnier than she is?) But the American fitness establishment wants you to train like the marathoner.

Oh, here's one more image to keep in mind, about the very origins of the word marathoner: According to legend, when the Greeks defeated the Persians in the battle of Marathon in 490 b.c., a runner named Pheidippides was dispatched to carry the good news back to Athens. At the end of his 22-mile journey, he reportedly shouted, "Rejoice! We conquer!"

And then he died of exhaustion.

THE BODY YOU WANT, IN THE TIME YOU HAVE

Traditional weight-control theory has given the chunky flunky three options: Eat fewer calories or burn more or some combination thereof.

Burning more calories is usually thought of as an active process, like jogging, lifting weights, or yanking your daughter out of some teenage Romeo's Mustang. But the majority of the calories you burn throughout the day are controlled by your basal metabolism. These are the calories your body burns whether you're active or not, whether you're sleeping or eating, whether you're thinking about sex or actually having some. Your body burns these calories to provide fuel for your brain, your heart, your other organs; to keep your muscles and other moving parts prepared for action.

Your body burns about 10 percent of its calories by digesting the food you eat, which is called the thermic effect of feeding. Thermic is a great word to remember, because it reminds you that your body is just one skin-wrapped furnace and that the food you eat is the fuel you feed your furnace.

The other -- and most variable -- way in which you burn calories is through voluntary activity. Exercising, playing with the kids, working in the yard, walking to the john -- every move you make expends more calories than you would burn by just sitting still. Physical activity accounts for anywhere from 10 to 30 percent of the energy your body uses each day.

So let's review: Your body has three mechanisms for burning calories. Two of them you don't think about, because basal metabolism and the thermic effect of feeding are invisible to you. And yet, those two account for 70 to 90 percent of the fuel you burn each day. So it makes sense that the best way to control body weight is to ramp up those two systems. Build muscle, and you increase your metabolism by up to 50 calories a day per pound of muscle. Eat more protein, and you crank up the thermic effect by as much as one-third. (We'll do the math in chapter 6.) In effect, you achieve truly metabolic weight control: Fat burning that hums along on its own even as you sit or sleep or just stew about pulling your daughter out of some teenage Romeo's Mustang.

So what does the current paradigm for exercise and nutrition offer you? Exercise routines that not only fail to build more metabolism-boosting muscle but also reduce the muscle you already have. And diet programs that not only fail to take advantage of the thermic effect of protein but also lower your muscle-building testosterone by reducing the fat that provides the building blocks for your manliest hormone. This is the equivalent of sending soldiers into battle without bullets in their guns.

The one effective weapon the established guidelines do give you is activity. We agree that activity is important, and all of the authors of this book have a lifelong passion for strenuous exercise. But we have to admit that increasing activity is the slowest, most frustrating way to lose weight.

THE SPEED BURNERS

What we're going to give you in this book is the fastest, most surefire way to lose fat, gain muscle, restore your body to its natural athletic shape, and reinforce your vital male essence. The key is to tap naturally into your body's supply of testosterone, the male hormone that, to varying degrees, governs musculature, height, bone density, sexual function, and a host of other elements that are of critical importance to men.

You also need to know as much as possible about regulating other key self-made chemicals, like growth hormone and cortisol.

Our premise is simple: We've taken everything we now know about naturally boosting hormone levels and organized that information into a comprehensive eating-and-workout plan that you can put into effect on an individualized basis. Testosterone helps you maximize your muscle mass and mobilize fat for energy -- in short, it helps you get the most out of your workouts. And if you follow our plan religiously -- doing the right exercises in the right combinations at the right times -- you'll spur your body's production of additional testosterone that will enable you to work out harder and longer and will aid your muscles in recovery and growth.

In a nutshell, the Testosterone Advantage Plan will allow you to adjust your body composition in order to meet your personal goals. You may want to drop 10 pounds of fat from around your waist. Or you may want to gain 10 pounds of muscle on your arms, legs, and chest. Whatever your specific goals are, we think that we can help you achieve them in a way that's impossible to do with any of those one-size-fits-all diets.

Are you going to miraculously transform yourself into one of those hulking figures you see on the cover of Muscle & Fitness magazine? No. Those guys have to commit their lives to looking that way. And many of them -- probably most of them -- are able to achieve their results only by injecting synthetic substances into their bodies. (Besides, research has shown that women don't necessarily lust after those types of bodies anyway. They prefer a lean, muscular look to a superhuman torso.)

But will the Testosterone Advantage Plan make you look better and feel better? Yes. Are you going to become the best you that you can be? We like to think so. And we're supported in this conviction by cutting-edge scientific research as well as the results of our own pilot program.

Although some of our concepts have been practiced in the world of bodybuilding for decades, the science underlying our plan is just starting to gain acceptance in the halls of academia. And when we say "academia," we're not talking about Hercules Tech. For example, the Harvard School of Public Health has conducted one of several major studies whose findings suggest that a high-fat, low-fiber diet raises testosterone levels.

We've organized these landmark insights into a simple 9-week plan, and we're confident that if you put it to work for you, you'll not only look and feel better but also become stronger than you've ever been and leaner than you've been since the days when you didn't even realize that it was a good shape to be in. Though your metamorphosis won't exactly be instant, you'll start getting measurably stronger after the first few workouts. Within 4 weeks, your body will start making important molecular adaptations that set the stage for gains in muscle size. After that, you could see muscle growth of 20 to 40 percent. Granted, those gains won't all happen in 9 weeks, but the foundation you build with this program will put you on the straightest, surest path to that destination.

And the best part of our program: You'll get to eat like a man and look like a god.

We believe we're ushering in an exciting new era in weight management for men. We're inviting you to join us on the frontier.

Copyright © 2002 by Rodale Inc.
Read More Show Less

Interviews & Essays

I'm a fitness journalist who has spent the past 10 years trying to find better ways to help guys lose fat, build muscle, and see the physique they want to see when they look in the mirror in the morning.

When I started out, I was perfectly willing to follow the rules, recommending low-fat diets, bodybuilding routines, and lots and lots of cardiovascular exercise.

Never mind that none of this was working for me, and that I was getting pudgier as the years went on. By the time I turned 40, I was almost embarrassed to tell people what I did for a living. To look at me, you never would have guessed I knew anything more about fitness and nutrition than anybody else on the street.

About four years ago, I started working closely with Mike Mejia, a trainer in New York who wanted to write articles for Men's Health magazine, where I had just started as fitness editor.

Mike had some amazing ideas about how guys could get in better shape, most of which I wasn't ready for. He followed a diet that was higher in protein and fat and lower in carbohydrates than what we were currently recommending. He did workouts that were different, too -- fewer exercises, slower repetitions. He put more emphasis on lifts that worked the body's biggest muscles, and figured the smaller muscles would take care of themselves.

And he did no cardiovascular exercise at all. Mike believed that long, slow, steady-paced cardio exercise -- the type most people do -- is a bad idea, since it interferes with muscle gains.

It took me a couple of years, but I finally figured out the two keys to what Mike practiced and preached: testosterone and metabolism.

The way Mike lifted -- emphasizing big muscles -- has been shown in studies to raise post-workout testosterone levels higher than other types of strength training. And a diet that's low in fat will lower testosterone levels, in comparison to a diet with moderate levels of fat -- say 30 to 40 percent.

Metabolism increases when you do intense weight workouts, and it stays elevated up to 48 hours after you set down your last dumbbell. It also increases when you add protein to your diet, and a long list of studies demonstrates this.

When you put the two keys together -- maximizing your body's testosterone action, and increasing your metabolism -- you get the formula for losing fat and increasing muscle that is at the heart of The Testosterone Advantage Plan.

The diet program put together by Jeff Volek, R.D., Ph.D., is easy to master. My colleague Adam Campbell put 17 of our coworkers on the program for nine weeks last January, and showed everyone that the program not only works, but works a little better than we'd anticipated. Some guys lost more fat than we'd thought they would, given the fact none of their diets were below 2,000 calories and that they were building muscle simultaneously.

But that's what happens when you give the male body what it needs to function hormonally, metabolically, and mechanically. Our bodies need fat, protein, and muscle-building exercise.

The results you can get from The Testosterone Advantage Plan are proof of that.

Lou Schuler

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 5 Customer Reviews
  • Posted February 21, 2010

    Undetstanding how hormones affect men and what we can do about it

    This was the first book I bought that spoke about how men are affected by their hormones, age and diet and what we can do about it. I found it very educational prompting me read more on the subject.
    I recommend it fopr any male trying to get back into shape.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 20, 2004

    It works.

    This plan lays it all out for you. From workout to diet to grocery shopping list. I tried it for 8 weeks, it recommends 9. Did I follow it 100%? No. I had a couple beers here and there, which is my norm anyway. And I still ate what I normally do at a party or cookout or birthday party. But it didn't matter. The weight came off and the muscle went on.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 16, 2003

    Be a man, but no beer !

    Before you buy this book, note that the program in it allows you to not drink any beer or alcohol. So they are saying, "be a man, get with the testosterone-building plan", but no beer. The problem is, beer in moderation builds bone and relaxes you. It is fun to drink beer. I will not do this program. I will continue to drink beer moderately, and jog and lift weights.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 17, 2001

    The answer for fat loss and muscle growth

    I've read many books on nutrition and fitness. I believe this book beats them all hands down. Not only do you get a great and easy to follow diet, you also get a fool proof workout plan that takes 3 hours a week....3 hours!!!! On top of that, its written by Men's Health...a name you can trust (ie not a supplement company). So, whether you are a beginner or a person thats been lifting weights for 15 years, this book will change your life.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 23, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 5 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)