The Theory And Practice Of Brewing Illustrated

The Theory And Practice Of Brewing Illustrated

by William Littell Tizard
     
 
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This is an OCR edition with typos.
Excerpt from book:
CHAPTER III. MALTING. i;,llI,i:Y—TESTS Of SAMPLES—MOULD THEASHING MACHINES—PURIFYING And Steeping—Stkkpwater Couching And Flooring—Drying—

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Purchase of this book includes free trial access to www.million-books.com where you can read more than a million books for free.
This is an OCR edition with typos.
Excerpt from book:
CHAPTER III. MALTING. i;,llI,i:Y—TESTS Of SAMPLES—MOULD THEASHING MACHINES—PURIFYING And Steeping—Stkkpwater Couching And Flooring—Drying— Stead's New Patent—Sprinkling And Anti-sprinkling—Kilns In Variety—Kinds Op Malt—Pooles And Wheeler's Patents—ConStitution Of Malt—Tests Mills—Rolls And Makers. Having in the preceding chapter disposed of all kinds of corn and kernel except barley, and of their constituents severally, we come at length to the remaining corn, and to the properties which distinguish it in the malting process; not that they are peculiar to the seed, but because they perform their functions with peculiar aptitude; and these, by nature, lead to the consideration of another part of our subject, namely, the qualities of samples. Barley is the hordeum of the ancients. When the philosophers Fourcroy and Vauquelin triturated the unripe seed with water, it deposited a white powder, possessing the properties of starch ; the water passed transparent through a filter, leaving a slimy substance behind it that possessed the properties of gluten; and when the solution was boiled, it deposited flakes of aIbumen ; the liquid was then reduced to a syrup by evaporation, and this residue being treated with alcohol, and the solution distilled with water, the alcohol being subsequently distilled to remove some remaining gluten which went with it, a syrup was left with a sweet taste: thus was the saccharum of the barley obtained. In the treatmentof the meal of ripe corn, they also found the water depositing a white powder, which soon became acid, the acetous water itself reddening an infusion of litmus. This water held a large quantity of matter in solution, consisting of aIbuminous gluten, mucilage, saccharum, and a proportion of the phosphate of lime and the nitrate o...

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781165700004
Publisher:
Kessinger Publishing Company
Publication date:
09/10/2010
Pages:
616
Product dimensions:
9.00(w) x 6.00(h) x 1.24(d)

Read an Excerpt


CHAPTER III. MALTING. i;,llI,i:Y—TESTS Of SAMPLES—MOULD THEASHING MACHINES—PURIFYING And Steeping—Stkkpwater Couching And Flooring—Drying— Stead's New Patent—Sprinkling And Anti-sprinkling—Kilns In Variety—Kinds Op Malt—Pooles And Wheeler's Patents—ConStitution Of Malt—Tests Mills—Rolls And Makers. Having in the preceding chapter disposed of all kinds of corn and kernel except barley, and of their constituents severally, we come at length to the remaining corn, and to the properties which distinguish it in the malting process; not that they are peculiar to the seed, but because they perform their functions with peculiar aptitude; and these, by nature, lead to the consideration of another part of our subject, namely, the qualities of samples. Barley is the hordeum of the ancients. When the philosophers Fourcroy and Vauquelin triturated the unripe seed with water, it deposited a white powder, possessing the properties of starch ; the water passed transparent through a filter, leaving a slimy substance behind it that possessed the properties of gluten; and when the solution was boiled, it deposited flakes of aIbumen ; the liquid was then reduced to a syrup by evaporation, and this residue being treated with alcohol, and the solution distilled with water, the alcohol being subsequently distilled to remove some remaining gluten which went with it, a syrup was left with a sweet taste: thus was the saccharum of the barley obtained. In the treatmentof the meal of ripe corn, they also found the water depositing a white powder, which soon became acid, the acetous water itself reddening an infusion of litmus. This waterheld a large quantity of matter in solution, consisting of aIbuminous gluten, mucilage, saccharum, and a proportion of the phosphate of lime and the nitrate o...

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