The Third Chimpanzee for Young People: On the Evolution and Future of the Human Animal

Overview

At some point during the last 100,000 years, humans began exhibiting traits and behavior that distinguished us from other animals, eventually creating language, art, religion, bicycles, spacecraft, and nuclear weapons—all within a heartbeat of evolutionary time. Now, faced with the threat of nuclear weapons and the effects of climate change, it seems our innate tendencies for violence and invention have led us to a crucial tipping point. Where did these traits come from? Are they part of our species immutable ...

See more details below
Hardcover
$18.64
BN.com price
(Save 18%)$22.95 List Price

Pick Up In Store

Reserve and pick up in 60 minutes at your local store

Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (18) from $10.28   
  • New (11) from $13.09   
  • Used (7) from $10.28   
The Third Chimpanzee for Young People: On the Evolution and Future of the Human Animal

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 7.0
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 10.1
  • NOOK HD Tablet
  • NOOK HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK eReaders
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$15.49
BN.com price
(Save 32%)$22.95 List Price
Note: Kids' Club Eligible. See More Details.

Overview

At some point during the last 100,000 years, humans began exhibiting traits and behavior that distinguished us from other animals, eventually creating language, art, religion, bicycles, spacecraft, and nuclear weapons—all within a heartbeat of evolutionary time. Now, faced with the threat of nuclear weapons and the effects of climate change, it seems our innate tendencies for violence and invention have led us to a crucial tipping point. Where did these traits come from? Are they part of our species immutable destiny? Or is there hope for our species' future if we change?

With fascinating facts and his unparalleled readability, Diamond intended his book to improve the world that today's young people will inherit. Triangle Square's The Third Chimpanzee for Kids is for them and the future they'll help build.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

VOYA, June 2014 (Vol. 37, No. 2) - Deborah L. Dubois
This adaptation (with Rebecca Stefoff) of Diamond’s adult book, The Third Chimpanzee HarperCollins, 1992), guides the reader through the evolution of humans as they began to differentiate themselves from animals. Human DNA is less than 2 percent different from chimpanzees, yet we have created language, art, agriculture, and complex tools. Diamond shares the history of man’s migration from Africa to Europe, Asia, and eventually the Americas, proposing theories of how the climate, available food, and man’s innate traits affected that migration. He also discusses how colonization by more advanced cultures affected primitive tribes and the animal species in several areas of the world. Interspersed throughout the text are one- to three-page explanations giving more depth and specific examples of facts and theories discussed. He explains how biology, geography, archaeology, and ecology come together to help us understand the development of mankind over thousands of years. He also touches on the possibility of civilizations on other planets. Diamond provides a rather pessimistic view of human nature and our future, but dedicates the book to the next generation in the hope that they will learn from the past he has delineated here. This readable book will appeal to those with an interest in evolution and man’s effect on the environment throughout history. It could be used as a supplementary text for social studies or sciences in high school. Reviewer: Deborah L. Dubois; Ages 15 to 18.
School Library Journal
05/01/2014
Gr 9 Up—Adapted for younger audiences by the redoubtable Stefoff but not significantly different in scope, arguments, or, for that matter, reading level from Diamond's original (Harper, 1992, 2006), this wide-ranging study of what makes us human offers provocative views of evolution, adaptation, cultural diffusion, sexuality, genocide, race, mass extinctions of the past and present, the roots of drug abuse and language, and even the search for extraterrestrial intelligence ("we're alone in a crowded universe. Thank goodness!"). The strength of Diamond's views is what makes them provocative, whether he's explaining why we—uniquely among social animals—prefer to have sex in private, or portraying the urge to smoke or take dangerous drugs as another manifestation of seemingly anti-survival animal displays, such as the male Bird of Paradise's plumage. A reasonably large array of photos, charts, and period images supply illustrations for what amounts to a comprehensive compendium of current issues. Thoughtful readers interested in any fields related to evolutionary science, anthropology, psychology, human history, and culture will find plenty to ponder.—John Peters, Children's Literature Consultant, New York City
From the Publisher
"This is exactly the kind of book that should be a 'set text' for a reinvigorated science curriculum: engaging, thought-provoking and bang up to the minute. If your teachers aren't recommending books like this - go out and get them anyway." Guy Claxton, author of What's the Point of School?
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781609805227
  • Publisher: Seven Stories Press
  • Publication date: 4/8/2014
  • Pages: 352
  • Sales rank: 516,382
  • Age range: 12 years
  • Product dimensions: 5.30 (w) x 8.10 (h) x 1.20 (d)

Meet the Author

JARED DIAMOND is professor of geography at the University of California, Los Angeles. He has published over 200 articles in Discover, Natural History, Nature, and Geo magazines. He is the author of several books including Guns, Germs, and Steel, which was awarded the Pulitzer Prize and has sold over 1.5 million copies, the international bestseller Collapse, and the recently published The World Until Yesterday: What Can We Learn from Traditional Societies?

Read More Show Less

Read an Excerpt

How This Book Came to Be
My own interests and background shaped this book. As a child, I wanted to be a doctor. By my last year in college, that goal had gently changed, and I wanted to become a medical researcher. I trained in physiology, which is the study of how living systems function, from cells to animals. Afterward I went on to teach and do research at the University of California Medical School in Los Angeles. 

But I had other interests as well. Birdwatching had attracted me since the age of seven, and I had also been lucky to attend a school that let me plunge into languages and history. I did not like the idea of spending the rest of my life on physiology alone. Then I had the chance to spend a summer in the highlands of New Guinea, a large tropical island north of Australia. the purpose of the trip was to measure how successfully birds were nesting. That project collapsed when i was unable to locate even a single bird’s nest in the jungle, but the trip fed my thirst for adventure and birdwatching in one of the wildest remaining parts of the world.

After that first trip to New Guinea, I developed a second career, focused on birds, evolution, and biogeography. I’ve returned to New Guinea and the neighboring Pacific Islands many times to pursue my bird research. As I saw human activity destroying the forests and birds I loved, I became involved in conservation, helping governments design national parks to protect ecosystems and plant and animal species. 

Finally, it was hard to study the evolution and extinction of birds without wanting to understand the evolution and possible extinction of the most interesting species of all, the species that includes you, me, and everyone on earth—Homo sapiens, the modern human. this book was the result. It begins with a look at our origins several million years ago. It ends with some thoughts about our future, and about ways we can learn from our past. 

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Introduction: what makes us human?

part one: just another big mammal
chapter 1: a tale of three chimps chapter 2: the great leap forward

part two: a strange life cycle 
chapter 3: human sexuality 
chapter 4: the origin of human races chapter 5: why do we grow old and die?

part three: uniquely human 
chapter 6: the mystery of language chapter 7: animal origins of art 
chapter 8: agriculture, for better and worse 
chapter 9: why do we smoke, drink, and use dangerous drugs? 
chapter 10: alone in a crowded universe

part four: world conquerors
chapter 11: the last first contacts chapter 12: accidental conquerors chapter 13: in black and white

part five: reversing our progress overnight 
chapter 14: the golden age that never was 
chapter 15: blitzkrieg and thanksgiving in the new world 
chapter 16: the second cloud 

Afterword : nothing learned, everything forgotten? 

Glossary

Index

Photograph and Illustration Credits 

About the Authors 

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)