The Thirty-nine Steps

The Thirty-nine Steps

3.4 48
by John Buchan
     
 

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I returned from the City about three o'clock on that May afternoon pretty well disgusted with life. I had been three months in the Old Country, and was fed up with it. If anyone had told me a year ago that I would have been feeling like that I should have laughed at him; but there was the fact. The weather made me liverish, the talk of the ordinary Englishman made me

Overview

I returned from the City about three o'clock on that May afternoon pretty well disgusted with life. I had been three months in the Old Country, and was fed up with it. If anyone had told me a year ago that I would have been feeling like that I should have laughed at him; but there was the fact. The weather made me liverish, the talk of the ordinary Englishman made me sick. I couldn't get enough exercise, and the amusements of London seemed as flat as soda-water that has been standing in the sun. 'Richard Hannay,' I kept telling myself, 'you have got into the wrong ditch, my friend, and you had better climb out.'

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9783736818354
Publisher:
BookRix
Publication date:
06/07/2014
Sold by:
Readbox
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
165
File size:
539 KB

Meet the Author

John Buchan was a Scottish diplomat, barrister, journalist, historian, poet and novelist. He published nearly 30 novels and seven collections of short stories. He was born in Perth, an eldest son, and studied at Glasgow and Oxford. In 1901 he became a barrister of the Middle Temple and a private secretary to the High Commissioner for South Africa. In 1907 he married Susan Charlotte Grosvenor and they subsequently had four children. After spells as a war correspondent, Lloyd George's Director of Information and Conservative MP, Buchan moved to Canada in 1935. He served as Governor General there until his death in 1940. Stuart Kelly is the Literary Editor of Scotland on Sunday. He is the author of Scott-land and The Book of Lost Books, and has contributed to The Decadent Handbook, Alasdair Gray: Critical Appreciations and the Scottish Goverment's Introducing Scottish Literature.

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The Thirty-nine Steps 3.4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 48 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This was a pretty short read (10 chapters) and I got through it pretty quickly. It was easy reading. I had seen the Alfred Hitchcock's version of the movie before I read it, so I went into it thinking there was a going to be a romance. WRONG! It wasn't anything like the movie (actually, I should say the movie wasn't anything like the book). I might have been improved by including a romance, but that's just from a woman's point of view (ha, ha!). Anyway, my overall impression of the book was that I didn't like it quite as well as I thought I was going to. You could really tell it was a dime novel. I didn't understand the complicated international secret and Scudder's code, mostly because the author lightly scimmed over that part (and that's the main part, right?). I kind of got bored with Hannay running around chapter after chapter. But the last three chapters redeem the rest of the book, I think. That was when I began to get interested and it grew more exciting. It's too bad Alfred Hitchcock didn't borrow a little more than the title and the main character's name and nothing else from the plot. Would I recommend another person to read it? Since it's a short read, I'd say go right ahead... just leave all expectations behind you.
Big_Willy More than 1 year ago
There's always a risk stepping out of ones interests and I downloaded this book from a mail-order flyer in the mail. Turns out it was a good move. This book is part espionage and all intrigue that takes place in the months leading toward World War I in Great Britain. The main character is an uninspired resident of London who wishes he knew his grander purpose to provide spark and excitement in his life. Turns out he gets that in spades when he meets up with another person in his apartment and sets off on a whirlwind adventure. The plot itself isn't complex but absolutely interesting as the character zips around the countryside sorting out what to do. I found many of the author's lines to be very funny and intelligent. This was a Google download so brace yourself for random characters sprinkled with love throughout this otherwise very short book. ENJOY!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book was quite refreshing! It had a good plot with good charactors. A very easy, enjoyable read!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I was amazed at the quick pace and wonderful storyline. They say this was the foundation for most spy thrillers. I can belive it.
Anonymous 28 days ago
A classic thriller well worth the read. ~*~LEB~*~
glauver More than 1 year ago
The Thirty-Nine Steps was one of the prototypes of what is now called spy fiction. Fans of LeCarre, Alistair MacLean, or Len Deighton might feel a bit let down. Richard Hannay was not a agent as we think of one, but more of an adventurer. The novel is one long chase with little letup. There is not much moral complexity; the English are good and the Germans are bad. John Buchan was a good descriptive writer, but his plots were full of holes and coincidences and don't stand scrutiny. Some of his remarks seem anti-Semitic, although I have read critics who defend him on this charge .In this novel, Hannay is the only character who stands out, probably because it is so short. Later books are better as he gathers a circle of friends to help him in his quests. The best way I can describe this book is Robert Louis Stevenson writing just before WWI.
Mary-MK More than 1 year ago
Well-written, fast-paced novel that stands the test of time.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
the_curious_reader More than 1 year ago
Superb spy thriller, filmed several times - once by Alfred Hitchcock - The Thirty-Nine Steps is worth reading even if you have seen one of the films as it surpasses its genre and stands on its own as a novel. Having read this book by John Buchan, my best bet is that you will go on to read more of his work..
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