The Three Cabritos

The Three Cabritos

5.0 1
by Eric A. Kimmel, Stephen Gilpin
     
 

View All Available Formats & Editions

Once upon a time three cabritos (little goats) decide to go to a Mexican fiesta. But their mother is worried. She warns them about Chupacabra, the goat-sucker who lives beneath the bridge. And sure enough, as the goats cross the bridge, he jumps out! "Say your prayers. I’m going to eat you," he tells the goats. But they are clever. And they know how to play

Overview

Once upon a time three cabritos (little goats) decide to go to a Mexican fiesta. But their mother is worried. She warns them about Chupacabra, the goat-sucker who lives beneath the bridge. And sure enough, as the goats cross the bridge, he jumps out! "Say your prayers. I’m going to eat you," he tells the goats. But they are clever. And they know how to play music — music that finally gets rid of that old goat-sucker forever! Pleasant illustrations rendered in pencil and digital techniques by Stephen Gilpin add to the story of the legendary creature, Chupacabra. An author’s note, glossary, and pronunciation guide are included.

Editorial Reviews

Book Links

Accompanied by cartoonlike illustrations, this adaptation of The Three Billy Goats Gruff is set in Texas near the Rio Grande. Although Mama is worried about her three cabritos—Reynaldo, Orlando, and AgustÍn—going to a fiesta across the border in Mexico, they know that their music playing—and the aid of a magic accordion—will protect them from the fierce Chupacabra, a legendary monster known as the "goat sucker."

School Library Journal

PreS - Gr 3 - An original retelling of "The Three Billy Goats Gruff," with a "Texas twist." Despite their mama's warnings about Chupacabra ("goat-sucker"), the monster that lives under the bridge, three cabritos (young goats) are determined to cross the Rio Grande to play music at a fiesta in Mexico. The smallest sibling reaches the crossing first and puts the hungry creature off with the promise of a better meal (his larger brother) and a bit of nervous fiddle playing. Soon, the middle brother arrives with his guitar and makes a similar escape. When the biggest goat approaches the bridge, he requests that he be allowed to play his accordion one last time before being gobbled up. Chupacabra agrees, but soon discovers that the instrument is magic: he must keep dancing until the music stops. Exhausted, he shrivels up into a husk "as dry and brittle as a dead cactus." Kimmel builds to this humorous climax throughout the tale. The light tone is matched by Gilpin's glossy, pastel-hued cartoons. The protagonists are depicted with comically exaggerated features. Unlike the vampire-esque creature of modern urban legend, Chupacabra is shown as a not-too-frightening sky-blue blob. Match this fun variant with other versions of the original, e.g., Paul Galdone's classic (Clarion, 1981); stories set in the Southwest, such as Helen Ketteman's Armadilly Chili(Albert Whitman, 2004); or tales about the power of magic and music, like Pete Seeger's Abiyoyo(S & S, 1994).-Joy Fleishhacker, School Library Journal

Copyright 2007 Reed Business Information
Kirkus Reviews
Kimmel sets his reworking of "The Three Billy Goats Gruff" just north of the Rio Grande, sending caprine musicians Reynaldo, Orlando and August'n tripping across the border to a fiesta in Mexico. First, of course, they must first get by the fearsome Chupacabra, or "goat sucker," guarding the bridge-who demands a tune in exchange for their lives. Gilpin stands the goats on hind legs, gives them overalls, band instruments and big horsey grins and pits them against a spiny blue monster that resembles a cross between Yoda and a whale-sized flea. Ultimately, big August'n tootles away on his accordion until the dancing Chupacabra collapses and deflates in exhaustion. Any political implications in this fresh, original take on the familiar tale are (surely) inadvertent, and would go over the heads of younger readers anyway. (end note) (Picture book/folktale. 5-7)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780761453437
Publisher:
Amazon Childrens Publishing
Publication date:
03/28/2007
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
8.60(w) x 11.10(h) x 0.50(d)
Lexile:
AD360L (what's this?)
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

Meet the Author

Eric A. Kimmel has collected and retold many tales from around the world. Among his best are Hershel and the Hanukkah Goblins (a Caldecott Honor Book), Anansi and the Moss-Covered Rock, and Cactus Soup. When not writing at his home in Portland, Oregon, he shares his tales at schools and conferences throughout the United States. Learn more: www.ericakimmel.com

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >

The Three Cabritos 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
MAJT More than 1 year ago
My students enjoyed this story when we were comparing versions of The Three Billy Goats Gruff.