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The Time Keeper [NOOK Book]

Overview

From the author who's inspired millions worldwide with books like Tuesdays with Morrie and The Five People You Meet in Heaven comes his most imaginative novel yet, The Time Keeper--a compelling fable about the first man on earth to count the hours. The man who became Father Time.

In Mitch Albom's newest work of fiction, the inventor of the world's first clock is punished for trying to measure God's greatest gift. He is banished to a cave for ...
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The Time Keeper

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Overview

From the author who's inspired millions worldwide with books like Tuesdays with Morrie and The Five People You Meet in Heaven comes his most imaginative novel yet, The Time Keeper--a compelling fable about the first man on earth to count the hours. The man who became Father Time.

In Mitch Albom's newest work of fiction, the inventor of the world's first clock is punished for trying to measure God's greatest gift. He is banished to a cave for centuries and forced to listen to the voices of all who come after him seeking more days, more years. Eventually, with his soul nearly broken, Father Time is granted his freedom, along with a magical hourglass and a mission: a chance to redeem himself by teaching two earthly people the true meaning of time.

He returns to our world--now dominated by the hour-counting he so innocently began--and commences a journey with two unlikely partners: one a teenage girl who is about to give up on life, the other a wealthy old businessman who wants to live forever. To save himself, he must save them both. And stop the world to do so.

Told in Albom's signature spare, evocative prose, this remarkably original tale will inspire readers everywhere to reconsider their own notions of time, how they spend it and how precious it truly is.
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Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble

In the hands of another storyteller, a fable about Father Time might seem forced or hollow. As told by Mitch Albom, it comes alive with a spiritual vibrancy that makes its relevant to our own lives. The gentle man who gave us For One More Day, The Five People You Meet in Heaven, and Have a Little Faith has done it again.

Publishers Weekly
Bestselling author Albom (Tuesdays with Morrie) turns his attention to Father Time in his new fabulist page-turner. Long ago—before a word like "ago" had any meaning—a man named Dor began to chart the passage of time, immediately realizing that "all his days were numbered," and so were his wife's. When she falls deathly ill, Dor climbs the Tower of Babel to beg the gods for help. But as a result of his brazenness, he is banished to a cave where he must endure listening to humanity plead for "more hours, more years, more time." After 6,000 years of torment, Dor is finally released back into the modern world with an enchanted hourglass and a mission: to teach two wayward souls the true value of time—Sarah Lemon, a distressed teen, who wishes the end would come quickly, and Victor Delamonte, a prosperous aging businessman trying his best to keep the end at bay. With a clever conceit and frequent shifts in perspective, Albom deftly juggles multiple narratives to craft an inspiring tale that will please his fans and newcomers alike. (Sept.)
Kirkus Reviews
Treacly fable by pop inspirationalist Albom (Tuesdays with Morrie, 1997, etc.). Dava Sobel and Longitude be damned, God doesn't like people who measure things. Six thousand–odd years ago--is the date a nod to Archbishop Ussher and his proto-creationism?--a fine young fellow named Dor invents the world's first clock and is banished to a cave for the affront, since only the deity is supposed to be concerned with such things, it being the days before hourly wage work and lawyers who bill in 15-minute increments. Dor now sits in a cave, "listening to something. Voices. Endless voices." And what do you suppose those voices want? Yup, time. More of it. Endless time. Or at least a year or two. Writing in his customary staccato ("But Father Time is real. And, in truth, he cannot age."), Albom gives Dor a chance to redeem himself by instructing two hapless earthlings--a man dying of cancer, a teenage girl in danger of dying by her own hand--in the meaning of life. The Little Prince it ain't: Albom seems to have taken the template for his novel from a corporate report, each page studded with boldfaced passages that would seem to signal something momentous; a person in a hurry could well read just those boldfaced passages and emerge with a pretty good idea of the storyline, which is plenty predictable in any event. Still, there are a few useful takeaways, among them these: If you're moribund, a pocket watch will cheer you right up; if you're worried about the prospect of imminent demise, then remember that, as the old dude who cometh from God's side sayeth, immortality "is not a gift." A product less than a book; those with not enough time on their hands might spend what they have more meaningfully elsewhere.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781401304706
  • Publisher: Hyperion
  • Publication date: 9/4/2012
  • Sold by: Hachette Digital, Inc.
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 240
  • Sales rank: 6,725
  • File size: 683 KB

Meet the Author

Mitch  Albom
Mitch Albom is an author, playwright, and screenwriter who has written seven books, including the international bestseller Tuesdays with Morrie, the bestselling memoir of all time. His first novel, The Five People You Meet in Heaven, was an instant number-one New York Times bestseller that has since sold more than six million copies worldwide. For One More Day, his second novel, was also a #1 New York Times bestseller. Both books were made into acclaimed TV films. Mitch also works as a columnist and a broadcaster, and serves on numerous charitable boards. He lives with his wife, Janine, in Michigan.

Biography

You might call Mitch Albom a jock-of-all-trades. Before becoming one of America's most beloved sport commentators and columnists, Albom was an amateur boxer, a nightclub singer and pianist, and a stand-up comedian. He is a nationally syndicated fixture of radio and print, and has been featured as an analyst on ESPN. He has covered college football and college basketball in two successful nonfiction books, and the best of his articles have been collected in a series of anthologies called Live Albom. However, what catapulted Albom into the literary limelight was the mega-selling 1997 memoir, Tuesdays with Morrie, his first book to sidestep sports altogether..

Tuesdays... is a moving account of Albom's reconnection with his old Brandeis professor and college mentor, Morrie Schwartz. After learning Schwartz had been stricken with Lou Gehrig's disease, Albom sought him out in Boston, and throughout a long, harrowing year, they spent every Tuesday together. As he faced his inevitable death, Schwartz shared a lifetime of memories, regrets, fears, and philosophical insights with his former student. A story that could easily have toppled into maudlin sentimentality, the memoir succeeded in large part because of Albom's skillful writing. Published in 30 languages in 34 countries, the book remains an international bestseller.

In 2003, Albom forayed into fiction with The Five People You Meet in Heaven, the emotionally resonant story of an old man who dies, convinced his life has had no meaning -- only to discover that nothing could be further from the truth. It, too, scored a huge success for the author – as did his followup novel, For One Day More.

Good To Know

The Oprah Winfrey-produced version of Tuesdays with Morrie, starring Jack Lemmon and Hank Azaria, won 4 Emmy Awards and was the most-watched TV movie of 1999.

Before Albom was a household name, he was known on the comedy circuit as the warm-up act for Gabe "Welcome Back Kotter" Kaplan.

Albom is an enthusiastic philanthropist, having founded two charitable programs, the Dream Fund and A Time to Help.

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    1. Hometown:
      Franklin, Michigan
    1. Date of Birth:
      May 23, 1958
    2. Place of Birth:
      Passaic, New Jersey
    1. Education:
      B.A., Brandeis University, 1979; M.J., Columbia University, 1981; M.B.A., Columbia University, 1982

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 373 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(212)

4 Star

(87)

3 Star

(44)

2 Star

(16)

1 Star

(14)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 373 Customer Reviews
  • Posted September 18, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    An excellent allegory. There are many people who write we

    An excellent allegory.
    There are many people who write well, there are gifted storytellers; when the two are found in the same person the resulting prose is poetic in its ability to speak to the reader on the deepest levels of one’s soul while using the simplest of language. Mitch Albom proves himself to possess these dual abilities in this small, but powerful, parable of time, life, living, love and the power to celebrate eternity in the space between breaths.
    The idea of time is a relatively recent concept. When humanity began keeping track of the passing of days, probably in order to have some measure of control of one’s environment, we also began a desire to “hoard” time and began considering the passing of time to be of more importance than the timeless moment. Mr. Albom does a superb job of bringing this hugely pondered idea (volumes have been written on various aspects of time) into a thought-provoking, easily comprehended, enjoyable allegory and takes only 220 (small) pages to accomplish the task.
    Before there was time, people enjoyed life as it came. Planting, hunting, talking, arguing, laughing, watching were occurrences unnoticed as there was no cause to measure their existence. Someone (in this book, a man named Dor), did notice a “moment” and became aware that there would another “moment” the next day. He began to measure moments/hours/days/weeks/seasons to the point of distraction from all other endeavors. Dor’s knowledge caused him to want more of what was never needed to be known (time) first begging God for more time with his beloved Alli, then cursing God when that wish was not granted. As a result of his actions he was sealed in a cave for the next 6000 years, listening to the ever increasing voices of the world who were asking for time to be changed (more, slowed, rewound) until he learns the “lesson” of time. His task will be accomplished when he has taught two people, one wanting more time, one desiring less, the lessons he learned.
    These few pages are packed with wisdom of The Moment. Mr. Albom acknowledges God’s influence in his life, but this work is not preachy, religious nor does it seek to convert those to read it to anything beyond becoming aware of the riches to be found in the absence of marking time. To become aware, to quote Kipling, “of the everlasting moment” holds all one desires, hopes for and can “possess” is the aim of this read.
    I make my living “measuring time” (appointments are scheduled, limited in length, regular in their being proffered) and own more instruments to keep track of its passing than I care to count. I have never been able to save/spend/take out/waste/keep time except by measuring the anxiety I experience as I attempt any of those. My “addiction” to time is deep and, I fear, terminal. What I am learning, and this book is a welcome lesson in this particular tutorial, is that there are places where time becomes irrelevant – holding my wife’s hand, playing with children, eating good food, laughing with friends, feeling the sun/rain – and those are the places where I truly am living.

    43 out of 48 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 6, 2012

    I wasn't sure what to expect from this book, but was pleasantly

    I wasn't sure what to expect from this book, but was pleasantly surprised by the content. I was moved, uplifted, and left with utter satisfaction upon finishing this book. My recommendation: read it. You won't regret it.

    40 out of 42 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted September 8, 2012

    I Also Recommend:

    Deceptively simple, a luminous story with a lot to think about .

    Deceptively simple, a luminous story with a lot to think about ... a gentle reminder to make the most of available time and not just marking it, waiting for something else, passing it unknowingly ... an easy read, can be digested in an afternoon and revisited in a pinch, like his other works.

    34 out of 37 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 8, 2012

    Good

    People kept saying on these reviews ' what is going on with these reviews, don't know if I should buy.' Well I now know; and I'm tempted to write the same but instead I'll try to explain. First I'll say that it's a good story, following the lives of three people who learn valuable lessons. This book makes you think and I believe will touch everyone in thier own way. It's about humanity and connecting whats in the book with your own life. At the end your just.....in a quiet awe. Its only about 200 pages but wow. Buy the book and you'll understand.

    29 out of 37 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted September 4, 2012

    As all his literature, a story that is enjoyable and will be rem

    As all his literature, a story that is enjoyable and will be remembered for a long time after...Great job, Mr. Albom!

    27 out of 30 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted September 6, 2012

    Time Keeper is very thought provoking. This is the first book I

    Time Keeper is very thought provoking. This is the first book I have read by this author and I would read another. Albom's novel encourages one to think about how we view time and what we do with the time that we have.

    22 out of 23 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 6, 2012

    Love!

    His books are fabulous, short andsweet, finished it in a day but makes you think about it long after :) thank you mitch!

    18 out of 20 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted September 14, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    A thought provoking look at the meaning of time

    The story begins with Dor, the first man in the world to think about and measure time. But as punishment for measuring God’s greatest gift, he becomes Father Time. Forced to live in a cave where time is meaningless and eternally listen to the pleas of mankind asking for more minutes, days, years.
    After thousands of years, Father Time is given a chance to redeem himself by seeking out two people on Earth and teaching them the true meaning of time. Thrown into the current world, Father Time learns that his innocent measures of time have evolved into desperate time tracking. Seeking two people whose pleas Father Time heard, he finds Victor, a wealthy business man whom wants to live forever, and Sarah, a girl who wants time to end. Dor must teach them the true meaning of time to save them, but in the process save himself.
    Albom provides another beautiful novel that explores the concept of time that we all take for granted. Through his thought provoking prose and diverse characters, Albom, teaches us something more important than counting the minutes, hours, and days- he explores the true meaning of time, why God limits it, and what really matters in life.

    14 out of 14 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted September 16, 2012

    Highly Recommended- A NYC #1 Best Seller List

    A wonderful and easy read book to add to your collection. The characters that Mitch has created and the subject matter "Time" show great creativity. All of his books are good to read and never a disappointment. Buy it now and get totally involved in the characters before the movie on it comes out.

    9 out of 10 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 9, 2012

    I'm in awe

    This is the first book I've read by this author, and it's not very often I come across a book that after reading the last line, I just sit back and say "whoa". This is a relatively short read, but is definitely a journey I will never forget. This is a subject obviously close to the heart of the author, and he does a phenomenal job turning those feelings into a story.

    8 out of 13 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted September 18, 2012

    For the life of me, I could not put "The Time Keeper"

    For the life of me, I could not put "The Time Keeper" down. Such an original idea that is beautifully crafted and put together, empowering and moving, it's definitely something that shouldn't be unread.

    7 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 8, 2012

    Great Story

    Makes you stop and think about life and taking one day at a time- Great Job Miitch, Keep up the good work




    6 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 10, 2012

    Just finished The Time Keeper. Loved it. A good reminder how pre

    Just finished The Time Keeper. Loved it. A good reminder how precious our lives are and enjoy every minute of it. Love all of Mitch Albom's books. I get his new book and usually have it read in a day or two and have to wait anxiously for the next one to come out. His books are worth the wait.

    5 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 27, 2012

    MUST READ!

    THIS WAS ONE OF THE MOST OUTSTANDING BOOKS I HAVE READ FOR MANY YEARS! THE AUTHOR IS A MASTER AT TAKING THE ORDINARY AND MAKING IT EXTRAORDINARY! HIS STORY OF HOW TIME BEGAN AND PROGRESSED KEEP ME READING WHEN I WAS TOO TIRED TO READ ANYMORE.

    tHIS NOVEL REALLY GETS YOU THINKING ABOUT THE MEANING OF LIFE, HOW TIME ORIENTIED WE ALL ARE AND HOW WE ALLOW TIME TO CONTROL SO MUCH OF WHAT WE DO!

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 18, 2012

    Yoyomitch

    You made me want to purchase this book thank you so much-girlreadinginthesun

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 15, 2012

    Great read!

    Was an amazingly quick read for me. Easy to get engrossed in the story and having 3 main characters kept you turning the page in order to find out what happened next. Well done! Found it in the store and took a quick look.... but found myself desiring to read it for the next week. So looked it up on the nook and am so glad I did.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted September 10, 2012

    I just finished the time keeper. Mitch Albom is one of my favor

    I just finished the time keeper. Mitch Albom is one of my favorite authors! The time keeper is thought provoking, interesting and Mitch really brings his characters to life. I tend to just fall into his books and climb out of them seeing the world thru his eyes. The time keeper is a must read especially if you're new to Mitch Albom! You'll fall in love and go buy all his books.....happy reading!
    Marylou

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 22, 2013

    I enjoyed, but not overjoyed.

    Makes for a good lazy day read. I expected more. I just felt the story had gaps. Nevertheless, I still appreciated the work.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 28, 2012

    Wonderful

    I loved this book. It was a quick read. And i loved how the chapters were short and jump from one character to the other. Worth the time and money. I even teared up towards the end.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 23, 2012

    Mikyozil

    Such a good im really enjoying it!!!!!!

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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