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The Torah Codes [NOOK Book]

Overview

Award-winner of the 2011 Hollywood Book Festival, bestselling thriller The Torah Codes has been called a Jewish version of The Da Vinci Code.

"FIVE STARS - I wish I could put an additional star on the rating system for this book." - Roseanne Schmidt, Goodreads.com, July 21, 2011

"FIVE STARS - Let me put this quite baldly: the question before us is not a fictional one. If ...
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The Torah Codes

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Overview

Award-winner of the 2011 Hollywood Book Festival, bestselling thriller The Torah Codes has been called a Jewish version of The Da Vinci Code.

"FIVE STARS - I wish I could put an additional star on the rating system for this book." - Roseanne Schmidt, Goodreads.com, July 21, 2011

"FIVE STARS - Let me put this quite baldly: the question before us is not a fictional one. If The Torah Codes describes a real phenomenon, then we are talking about statistical evidence that the scriptures are indeed supernatural—that is to say, holy, inspired by a force with, at the very least, a god’s-eye-view of history. Including, one might presume, future history." - Ien Nivens, Berkshire Fine Arts, May 23, 2011

A reclusive computer programmer, Nathan Yirmorshy, pounds out ones and zeros in the quiet of his home while his landlord secretly watches from behind a two-way mirror. When an intercepted note connects the landlord to a secret society, and a detective ends up dead, Nathan must abandon his home and everything familiar to him, open his heart to a tarot reader he has never met, and trust her with his life--just as the ancient scriptures have foretold.

An appendix of essays by rabbis, doctors, and physicists discuss the themes of the book, specifically, the Bible codes and the Shekinah, the female aspect of God. Read the first chapter at
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Editorial Reviews

Berkshire Finse Arts - Ien Nivens
5 stars! Let me put this quite baldly: the question before us is not a fictional one. If The Torah Codes describes a real phenomenon, then we are talking about statistical evidence that the scriptures are indeed supernatural—that is to say, holy, inspired by a force with, at the very least, a god’s-eye-view of history. Including, one might presume, future history.
Avid Reader - Andrew Christenson
I read this book in one sitting because I could not put it down. Every chapter kept me hooked. Fascinating and smart.
Avid Reader - Jonathan Berman
5 stars!...And the book roars along for quite some time in that manner, driven both by plot twists and -- of far greater importance -- a superb main character. Nathan is smart, odd, witty, and a bit world-weary. He's a great character to tag along with. The pages seem to turn themselves.
Avid Reader - Mackenzie Jones
5 stars! I did not expect to enjoy this book so much as it isn't my usual genre. I did read The Da Vinci Code so was curious about the comparison. I think Mr. Barany's book was far better written. The story held my attention, loved his unusual humor. In fact, I had to force myself to stop reading last night. Would definitely recommend. A real plus is that part of the purchase goes to Bay Area schools.
The Book Review - A. R. Cook
5 stars! The book contains a healthy portion of suspense, action, and mystery. This book is a page-turner that I found very difficult to put down. The book has kind of a Dan Brown Da Vinci Code feel to it. The appendix is good reading as well as food for thought and should not be skipped. The author is donating a portion of the book sales to the San Francisco Bay Area Jewish Schools. A good book and helping a good cause is a winning combination!
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Product Details

  • BN ID: 2940013133020
  • Publisher: Dafkah Books
  • Publication date: 8/12/2011
  • Series: The Torah Codes , #1
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 370
  • Sales rank: 346,993
  • File size: 2 MB

Meet the Author

Ezra Barany has been fascinated by codes and puzzles ever since he was a little tot. He started writing suspense and thriller stories in college and got seriously interested in the Bible codes while attending Aish HaTorah’s Discovery seminar in Jerusalem. The Torah Codes is Ezra’s first novel. Ezra has been a high school physics teacher, fiction writing teacher, songwriting teacher, ESL teacher to French children and pop performer. In his free time, he writes mushy love songs inspired by his wife and book coach Beth Barany.

Ezra now lives in the San Francisco Bay Area where he is working on his next book. He is available for presentations and select readings. To inquire about an appearance, please contact Ezra[at]TheTorahCodes[dot]com.
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 10 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(6)

4 Star

(2)

3 Star

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2 Star

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1 Star

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Sort by: Showing all of 10 Customer Reviews
  • Posted April 8, 2011

    His name was in the Torah!

    The Torah Codes begins with an unnamed person pondering the problems associated with digging up a body on a busy public street and what may happen if the killer is watching. The person comes across very quickly as somebody who may have some serious mental health conditions. The reader's opinion of this person (Nathan) improves somewhat as he outsmarts a survey/salesperson on the street. The enhanced opinion drops quickly as this previously sharp-witted, quick thinking individual begins to obsess over the nose ring that is being worn by the clerk in an ice cream shop. As we learn that Nathan is actually a computer programmer that works from home, he has more thoughts about the dead body underground before going home to work on his project. After a long stretch of work, Nathan discovers hidden cameras in his house. This discovery launches him into some adventures that carry through most of the book. There are some unusual characters and unexpected twists. The book contains a healthy portion of suspense, action, and mystery. This book is a page-turner that I found very difficult to put down. The book has kind of a Dan Brown Da Vinci Code feel to it. The actual story is just over 300 pages long. The rest of the book contains essays by various authors on Bible codes, Torah codes, and some other subjects. The appendix is good reading as well as food for thought and should not be skipped. The author is donating a portion of the book sales to the San Francisco Bay Area Jewish Schools. A good book and helping a good cause is a winning combination! Disclosure of Material Connection: I was given a copy of this book by the author. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted September 20, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    Introduced me to a Science (Fiction?) I didn't know existed...

    This was a great way for me to learn more about a topic that I'd only briefly seen covered on melodramatic History channel specials or the old "In Search Of..." series (remember that?). Biblical numerology, and the way that Barany has treated it, personally is more interesting to me than other religious conspiracies treated in famous fiction like The DaVinci Code (which I tried to slog through but gave up on, sorry Dan Brown enthusiasts!). This was a page turner that is backed up by a lot of credible analysis and research, which grounds it in a chilling feeling of reality. For a first time published novelist (if I'm not mistaken), Ezra Barany is really kicking butt here with a tense yet emotional thriller. I like Michael Connelly, Dennis Lehane and other modern mystery masters and this was a nice, quick thriller to bang out in between the larger time commitment of those best-sellers. I particularly liked how the protagonist was flawed and insecure, always questioning himself yet charging forward along the pursuit of an inevitable truth. And that it's set in the SAN FRANCISCO BAY AREA, specifically the East Bay (Oakland, Berkeley, etc.), the best place on Earth! :-) It's definitely worth the price, and the layout on the Nook looks great! (I'm reading it on Adobe Digital Editions for the PC and the resolution is really good). Five stars -- mystery fans pick it up. :-)

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted July 6, 2011

    Do you believe in the Torah Codes?

    The Torah Codes - Review by Martha A. Cheves, Author of Stir, Laugh, Repeat

    'I needed to walk around someone, so I had to step on the dirt of one of the tree plots that lined the street. As I stepped on the soft dirt, my heart grew cold. I nearly threw up. A body had been cut up and recently buried underneath the dirt. A man with dark hair, a pin-striped suit, a golden wedding ring on his finger. I knew this. I knew this like I knew my own name. There was nothing to indicate such a thing. A million reasons could be given for why the dirt was soft. But I knew there as a body down there. And that I was next.'

    'My eyes voted for the bed. Two hours later, it was 8:12 p.m. and I realized I hadn't let my bladder vote. I headed for the bathroom and turned on the light. My eyes complained. I turned off the light. I leaned against the mirror above the sink and reassured them that the light was off and that they could now open again. I opened my eyes expecting the typical picture: round face, brown hair, brown eyes, long neck, but all close up since my forehead was leaning on the mirror. But it wasn't myself I saw. I saw a room. A room filled with cameras. Photos were taped to the wall. I cupped my hands to the mirror and saw the room more clearly. All the cameras were pointed straight at me. But the room was dark and no one was there.'
    Nathan is bi-polar and when he gets busy and forgets to take his meds he does have a tendency to imagine things. Could this be one of those times? The best thing for him to do is get out of his landlord's duplex and find a place where he is safe. But that's kind of hard when no matter where he goes he feels someone is following. Someone wants to harm him. Then he runs into Sophia as she gives tarot readings at a table set up outside a bookstore.

    Nathan invites Sophia back to his apartment but not for what she thinks. He wants her to look into the mirror to assure him he isn't hallucinating. And after confirming that what he sees is real, she talks him into going to the police.

    As the police search the owner of the unit next to Nathan's they discover pictures of not only him in the unit but of him on the outside as well as pictures of his mother and father while on their honeymoon. But why? How? He only knows the owner of the unit, who is also his landlord, due to renting from him. He had never met him prior to renting the unit.

    In The Torah Codes Nathan's travels take him to a Rabbi who explains how the codes are actually a part of the Bible. He makes Nathan aware that there are 36 people who are directly connected to the codes and he, as well as Sophia, are apparently connected in some way. Then he meets the creator of MEG (Motionless Electromagnetic Generator) making the puzzle even more confusing. This becomes just the beginning, as his journey leads him to Israel in search of answers.

    So, are the Codes real? In The Torah Codes, Author Ezra Barany has included some very interesting statistics that will make the mind wonder. At least it did mine.

    2011
    375 pages
    Dafkah Books
    ISBN# 978-0-9832960-1-0

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted June 9, 2011

    A fun thriller

    This was described to me as sort of a Jewish Da Vinci Code and, truth be told, that was enough to get me interested. Nathan discovers that his landlord is spying on him, his name (and several other things) are encoded in a certain book of the Torah, and several people are after him for some weird and vaguely religious reason. Okay, so maybe my synopsis isn't a good sell, but the fact is that I plowed through this book in record time. Nathan is likable and often very funny, and the action kept me turning the pages. Do I believe prophecy is encoded in the Torah? Doesn't matter. It was fun and crazy and I look forward to Barany's next thriller.
    Confession time: I did not read the essays in the appendix. I hear they're quite good and well worth reading, but I was just in it for the story, not the religious speculation.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 11, 2012

    Wasn't sure I would like it but

    I wasn't to sure about this one. I am not much of a fan of murder mystery types, but then I couldn't put it down. 500+ pages went by really fast!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted July 8, 2011

    Fast-paced fun

    I enjoyed reading this book, it's one that most Dan Brown fans will really enjoy.
    The main character, Nathan, a bipolar programmer, is a fresh voice. He is witty without being annoying and many of his thoughts made me laugh out loud at the nuttiness that was is his thought process. The rest of the characters are not particularly memorable, but they do keep the plot moving forward without boring the reader.
    The plot is similar in pacing to the DaVinci Code, trying its best to stay moving forward, but made a bit confusing by the quick exchange of information that the characters seem to understand as soon as it's uttered. It can be seem a bit unbelievable at times, but, unlike Brown's overbearing book, this one keeps the mood light.
    I must nitpick on one issue, though. Sophia, the main female character, is a Tarot card reader, which although an interesting twist to add, I would have liked the real meanings of the cards to have been used, not strange ones that are never used. As a Tarot reader myself, it was hard to swallow the twisted meanings of cards that are just as important to a religion as the Torah is to the Jewish community. It is a bit picky, I know, but it is what struck me. This however, probably won't affect the majority of the audience, so it's definitely not something that should deter anyone from reading the book.
    The essays that accompany the story are fascinating and definitely something to consider when purchasing the book.
    This is a fun, quick-paced story that will not disappoint.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted March 4, 2013

    I found this book to be intelligently written, a fascinating top

    I found this book to be intelligently written, a fascinating topic and nearly impossible to put down. A must read as far as I'm concerned.

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  • Posted July 9, 2012

    The Torah Codes by Ezra Barany is a tantalizing read filled with

    The Torah Codes by Ezra Barany is a tantalizing read filled with mystery and intrique. The Yiddish legend of the 36 Righteous Ones plays a key role in the story, which I personally find very interesting. Great character building. Barany makes you want to read to the very end. I'm not one to easily give 5 stars but Barany's Torah Code simply deserves it.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 22, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted October 23, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

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