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The Town Mouse and the Country Mouse
     

The Town Mouse and the Country Mouse

by Bernadette Watts Edith M B. B., Aesop, B Watts
 
Another in our popular series of shaped books tellling the still pertinent story of two ways of life. Good stories never lose their power. Aesop, an ancient Greek, first wrote this tale of a country mouse who samples the life of her city cousin, and finds the simple peace of the country far preferable. Ethel Hays, the illustrator, has changed the cousins from male to

Overview

Another in our popular series of shaped books tellling the still pertinent story of two ways of life. Good stories never lose their power. Aesop, an ancient Greek, first wrote this tale of a country mouse who samples the life of her city cousin, and finds the simple peace of the country far preferable. Ethel Hays, the illustrator, has changed the cousins from male to femaile so that she can indulge her talent for rendering beautifully dressed mouse ladies. Even the country mouse's Sunday best is outshone by the city mouse's complex and fashionable wardrobe.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Jeanne K. Pettenati
This delightful retelling of the Aesop fable is beautifully illustrated and draws readers into the respective habitats of the main characters. In the story the country mouse and town mouse visit each other because they are curious to see how each lives. Both treat their guest regally and the visits solidify a friendship. Their trips are adventures into the unknown, where new sights, sounds and tastes awaken their senses. But when all is said and done, the town mouse misses the city and the country mouse misses her rural abode. They go their separate ways, but agree to visit again someday. It is a great way for children to see the world from two perspectives.
School Library Journal
Gr 1-3A fast-paced, yet poetic retelling of the well-loved fable, enhanced with Hannon's charming illustrations. This version features two female cousins, both of whom learn the lesson ``there's no place like home.'' The full-bled artwork depicts the anthropomorphized mice (life-sized on some pages) in sun or hearth-lit scenes. The print is large and easy on the eyes. Unfortunately, some of the brilliant color and sharp details of the cover illustration are lost on the interior pictures where the printing is dulled by inferior paper quality. Nonetheless, this is a fine choice for beginning readers whether or not they are familiar with the story.Gale W. Sherman, Pocatello Public Library, ID
Ilene Cooper
The tale of the town mouse and his country cousin has been told many times before, but this version will be appreciated by a slightly older crowd, who will like Craig's strip design, which alternates with full-page art, as well as the occasional cartoon effects, such as a cat leaping out of the boxed design. In a departure from the usual renditions of the fable, Craig has personalized her characters, naming them Charlie and Tyler, and she adds embellishments to the story. For instance, at the conclusion, Tyler puts on his top hat, white tie, and tails for an evening out at the theater while Charlie's at home counting the stars. There's plenty of visual detail to enjoy in Craig's watercolor art, and the text is full of fun. Libraries will appreciate this variation on an old favorite.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781558589872
Publisher:
North-South Books, Inc.
Publication date:
08/01/1998
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
8.85(w) x 11.71(h) x 0.37(d)
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

Meet the Author

Bernadette Watts has loved to draw since her childhood in England. She created her first picture book under the influence of Beatrix Potter. Watts studied at the Maidstone Art School in Kent and is the illustrator of North South fairy tales The Snow Queen and The Ugly Duckling.

Though many modern scholars dispute his existence, Aesop's life was chronicled by first century Greek historians who wrote that Aesop, or Aethiop, was born into Greek slavery in 620 B.C. Freed because of his wit and wisdom, Aesop supposedly traveled throughout Greece and was employed at various times by the governments of Athens and Corinth. Some of Aesop's most recognized fables are The Tortoise and the Hare, The Fox and the Grapes, and The Ant and the Grasshopper. His simple but effective morals are widely used and illustrated for children.

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