The Treaty of Waitangi Companion: Maori and Pakeha from Tasman to Today

Overview

The first comprehensive guide to key documents and notable quotations on New Zealand’s Treaty of Waitangi, this volume explores the relationship between the Maori and the Pakeha—New Zealanders who are not of Maori descent. Sourced from government publications, newspapers, letters, diaries, poems, songs, and cartoons, this enlightening anthology provides an introduction to the many voices that have shaped Maori and Pakeha history since 1840. The compilation includes primary historical sources in Maori as well as ...

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Overview

The first comprehensive guide to key documents and notable quotations on New Zealand’s Treaty of Waitangi, this volume explores the relationship between the Maori and the Pakeha—New Zealanders who are not of Maori descent. Sourced from government publications, newspapers, letters, diaries, poems, songs, and cartoons, this enlightening anthology provides an introduction to the many voices that have shaped Maori and Pakeha history since 1840. The compilation includes primary historical sources in Maori as well as the English translations and covers numerous topics, including background to the treaty, the New Zealand Wars, the Maori Women’s Movement, and Don Brash’s politics. Thorough and informative, this is a significant work that will appeal to those interested in pacifism, biculturalism, and racial equality.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781869404673
  • Publisher: Auckland University Press
  • Publication date: 2/1/2011
  • Pages: 304
  • Product dimensions: 6.80 (w) x 9.40 (h) x 1.80 (d)

Meet the Author

Vincent O’Malley has worked as a professional historian for 17 years. He is the author of Agents of Autonomy: Maori Committees in the Nineteenth Century and the coauthor of The Beating Heart: A Political and Socio-Economic History of Te Arawa. He is a founding partner of HistoryWorks, Inc. and a contributor to various scholarly journals, including Ethnohistory, Journal of the Polynesian Society, Labour History Review, and New Zealand Journal of History. Bruce Stirling has been involved in researching, writing, and presenting reports for the Treaty of Waitangi claims process for more than 15 years. Wally Penetito is a professor of Maori education and a codirector of He Parekereke, The Institute for Research and Development in Maori and Pacific Education at Victoria University of Wellington. He is the author of What's Maori About Maori Education?

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Table of Contents

Preface vii

Acknowledgements and list of abbreviations ix

A note on the entries x

Reflections on the Treaty: An Introduction Wally Penetito 1

1 Towards a Treaty 8

1.1 Early Maori and Pakeha encounters 8

1.2 Whalers, sealers and traders 12

1.3 Maori travellers 19

1.4 Missionaries and Maori 23

1.5 Forging stronger links with the British 27

1.6 Background to the Treaty 32

1.7 Treaty texts 36

1.8 Signing the Treaty 42

2 First Steps 48

2.1 Early perceptions of the Treaty 48

2.2 The Wairau conflict 51

2.3 The Northern War 54

2.4 Early conflicts to the south and the arrest of Te Rauparaha 57

2.5 The wastelands instructions 62

2.6 Purchasing Maori lands 68

3 The Seeds of Conflict 74

3.1 New Zealand Constitution Act and settler self-government 74

3.2 The Maori economy 78

3.3 Maori-Pakeha relations 82

3.4 The emergence of the Kingitanga movement 87

3.5 The Waitara purchase 94

3.6 Kohimarama conference 99

3.7 The runanga system 104

4 The New Zealand Wars 110

4.1 The Taranaki War 110

4.2 The invasion of Waikato 115

4.3 Confiscating Maori lands 125

4.4 Pai Marire 133

4.5 Te Kooti and Titokowaru 142

4.6 'Loyalist' responses 147

5 Maori and Pakeha After the Wars 154

5.1 The Native Land Court 154

5.2 Land dealings 160

5.3 Repudiation and other Maori responses 164

5.4 Te Whiti and the invasion of Parihaka 172

5.5 'Opening up' the King Country 178

5.6 King Tawhiao's 1884 visit to London 185

5.7 Maori committees 190

5.8 Maori Parliament 194

5.9 Maori women's movements 197

5.10 The Maori MPs 201

5.11 Native Schools 205

5.12 Maori and the Liberals before 1900 211

5.13 Maori and Pakeha relations 217

6 A New Century 222

6.1 'Taihoa'and its rollback 222

6.2 Maori Councils Act and the Young Maori Party 230

6.3 The Pioneer Maori Battalion 233

6.4 The Ratana faith 237

6.5 Ngata and land development 241

6.6 The return to Waitangi 246

7 Urbanisation and Assimilation 252

7.1 Centennial celebrations 252

7.2 28 Maori Battalion 258

7.3 Settling grievances 261

7.4 Urbanisation and the 'colour bar' 266

7.5 The Hunn Report and its aftermath 278

7.6 The re-emergence of Maori protest 284

8 Maori Renaissance? 291

8.1 Nga Tamatoa and other movements 291

8.2 The 'haka party' incident 296

8.3 Waitangi Day / New Zealand Day: a day off or a rip-off? 303

8.4 The 1975 Maori land march 312

8.5 Birth of the Waitangi Tribunal 320

8.6 Takaparawha/Bastion Point 327

8.7 Raglan Golf Course 335

8.8 1981 Springbok tour 338

8.9 The revival of te reo Maori 344

9 Upheaval and Reform 351

9.1 Mana motuhake and Maori sovereignty 352

9.2 Treaty of Waitangi Act 1985 and the Waitangi Tribunal 356

9.3 The State-Owned Enterprises cases 361

9.4 The Treaty backlash and Pakeha Treaty advocates 366

9.5 The Waitangi Tribunal and the 'h' word 374

9.6 The sesquicentenary celebrations 378

10 A New Millennium 386

10.1 Closing the gaps? 387

10.2 Orewa and its aftermath 391

10.3 Being Pakeha or becoming indigenous? 398

10.4 The past before us: walking into a Treaty future 405

Bibliography 410

Index 415

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