THE TREES

THE TREES

4.2 6
by Conrad Richter
     
 

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“They moved along in the bobbing, springy gait of a family that followed the woods as some families follow the sea.” In that first sentence Conrad Richter sets the mood of this magnificent epic of the American wilderness. Toward the close of the eighteenth century the land west of the Alleghenies and north of the Ohio river was an unbroken sea of trees.

Overview

“They moved along in the bobbing, springy gait of a family that followed the woods as some families follow the sea.” In that first sentence Conrad Richter sets the mood of this magnificent epic of the American wilderness. Toward the close of the eighteenth century the land west of the Alleghenies and north of the Ohio river was an unbroken sea of trees. Beneath them the forest trails were dark, silent, and lonely, brightened only by a few lost beams of sunlight. Here the Lucketts, a wild, woodsfaring family, lived their roaming life, pushing ever westward as the frontier advanced and as new settlements threatened their isolation.
 
Richter has written, not a historical novel, of which there are so many, but a novel of authentic early American life, of which there are so few. It is the primitive story of Worth Luckett, the hunter, and of Jary, his woman; of Genny, Wyitt, Achsa, and Sulie, their woods-wild children; of the bound boy and the Solitary and Jake Tench; but principally of the oldest girl, Sayward Luckett, whos people as far back as she knew had always been hunters and gunsmiths to hunters, but who, through the quiet, growing, and yet tragic oppression of the trees, turns her back at last on her life as a hunter’s child and becomes a tiller of the soil.
 
This novel of great lyrical beauty and high excitement tells the story of the transition of American pioneers from the ways of the wilderness to the ways of civilization. Here is the true American epic. Here is the raw adventure, swift and cruel in its episodes; but here too is the poetry of loneliness. Here is a portrait of frontier life as it really must have seemed to the pioneers. Here in short is a masterpiece by the man who gave us The Sea of Grass.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780804150996
Publisher:
Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group
Publication date:
10/02/2013
Sold by:
Random House
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
304
Sales rank:
142,481
File size:
2 MB

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The Trees 4.2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 6 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I, too, read The Trees as a high school student, and I loved it. This novel vividly depicts frontier life through characters that are engaging and well-developed. The Trees, when read with The Fields and The Town, creates such a well-rounded portrait of American pioneers that one cannot help but relate to their struggles and apply them to the modern world. I would recommend this book to anyone who loves fiction or history.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
I wanted to review this book because I read the review by the high school student and felt so much sympathy for her/him. The book gave me an insight into the lives of American pioneers. The characters are so real, and it is so easy to see how different personalities fit into the pioneer movement. I read this book as an adult, as well and The Fields and The Town. I don't think I would have enjoyed them as a teenage, but they are some of the best books I have ever read. I tried to read Wuthering Heights as a teen and couldn't, and when I read it a few years ago I loved it, too.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Pads in randomly chanting: claws and fury claws ad fury then he jumps 5 feet i the air and climbs a tree.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I was assinged to read this for over the summer. I love to read, even when I need to read for school, my teachers normally give out good book assignements. I hated this book. After 2 months, I wasn't half way done. Every time I started to read it, I'd fall asleep, or give up out of boredom. There was no plot, no climax, and you only feel connected to Sayward, who lives a hugly boring life. Perhaps this book was written above a highschool level of understanding... or perhaps, it was to cure insomnia. Whichever, I wouldn't recomend this to my worst enemy... I like them too much. If it was an option, I would have given 0 stars.