The Trial of Thomas E. Toolan III

( 1 )

Overview

On June 21, 2007, Thomas E. Toolan III was convicted of first-degree murder and of assault and battery with a dangerous weapon for the October 25, 2004 killing of Elizabeth "Beth" Lochtefeld in her rented cottage on the island of Nantucket, Massachusetts. It was the first homicide in Nantucket in twenty-one years. Media covering the trial included ABC's internet services division, CBS' 48 Hours, NBC's Dateline, NPR, People Magazine, the New York Post, The Nantucket Inqurer And Mirror, The Nantucket Independent, ...
See more details below
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (5) from $8.08   
  • New (4) from $8.08   
  • Used (1) from $9.94   
Sending request ...

Overview

On June 21, 2007, Thomas E. Toolan III was convicted of first-degree murder and of assault and battery with a dangerous weapon for the October 25, 2004 killing of Elizabeth "Beth" Lochtefeld in her rented cottage on the island of Nantucket, Massachusetts. It was the first homicide in Nantucket in twenty-one years. Media covering the trial included ABC's internet services division, CBS' 48 Hours, NBC's Dateline, NPR, People Magazine, the New York Post, The Nantucket Inqurer And Mirror, The Nantucket Independent, and The Cape Cod Times. The author attended the nearly three-week trial from the beginning of opening statements, and this is his account of the day-to-day proceedings.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781430325611
  • Publisher: Lulu.com
  • Publication date: 6/28/2007
  • Pages: 64
  • Sales rank: 1,120,799
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 0.15 (d)

Read an Excerpt

The prosecutor was once again dogged and methodical in producing items of evidence that cumulatively added up to a small mountain. At one point, the scallop knife was placed on an evidence table within the defendant's reach, but he made no move to seize it and acted as if he were unaware of its position, even though the courtroom guards were unarmed. After lunch, there was a break in the testimony while a twenty-one minute video was shown without the accompanying audio, which the police official who had operated the camera described malapropistically as "extemporaneous noise." (He meant extraneous noise. Other Spoonerisms included the defense counsel's repeated use of "lay" for "lie" and the judge's daily confirmation that the jury remained "indifferent," legal jargon for impartial and unbiased.) The video depicted the victim's lifeless, bloodstained body lying on the floor of the living room after the objects that had been placed on her back had been removed, as well as bloodstains in other rooms and in both rental cars. Tellingly, several of the jurors averted their glances from the monitor, unable to look at the gory scenes. Especially in the absence of any expression of remorse or regret, this does not augur well for the defendant, who continued to direct his forlorn glances away from the courtroom drama. He even betrayed no reaction when some of his letters and emails to the victim were read aloud by his counsel. Examples: "And then it is the screaming, real or no, seems so" when the relationship was rocky; "Placid is the dull rose with the red sung through," when their love seemed to blossom. After the killing, the defendant is said to have lain on the victim's bed and rereadsome of these verses.

On the eighth day of the trial, the defendant and the jurors avoided looking at each other. Referring to the canine pills seized from the defendant's travel bag in Rhode Island, the defense attorney noted that sometimes people take them "to get high" and questioned whether the existence of the veterinarian who wrote the prescription had been verified. Also seized were the defendant's olive-green trenchcoat and gray overcoat, a dress shirt, a tie, and shoes; an amethyst ring; vitamins; various prescription medicines, most but not all Class E controlled substances, such as Zoloft antidepressant tablets and a tranquilizer that also acts as a venal block for pulse reduction; and a single condom. A press representative behind me commented, "He had a rolling drugstore."
A Nantucket airport employee reported that the defendant had accidentally walked into the ladies' room, perceived his mistake, turned and left. Prosecutor: "And what did you do next?" Witness, giggling: "I went to the bathroom."
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 5
( 1 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(1)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 26, 2007

    A necessary sequel to Brian McDonald's Safe Harbor: A Murder In Nantucket

    The fascinating, fourteen-day murder trial of Thomas E. Toolan III was a dramatic contest between the findings of learned, Harvard-educated psychologists, psychiatrists, and criminologists and mountains of testimony by both expert and ordinary witnesses, between theories of diminished responsibility and common sense. The latter easily prevailed: the jury reached a verdict after only four and one-half hours of deliberation -- about the length of time, as Hilary Russ of The Cape Cod Times wrote, that it would have taken the defendant to drive from Cape Cod back to his Manhattan residence had he not been intercepted by state police near Warwick, Rhode Island. If you weren't in attendance, reading this work is tantamount to having been there. The day-by-day repartee, intended and accidental humor, pathos, and grim reality are faithfully portrayed by a professional writer and author. For the background of this case, the reader is referred to Brian McDonald's book, Safe Harbor: A Murder In Nantucket, published in both hardcover and paperback by St. Martin's Press.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)