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The Triathlete's Guide to Run Training

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Overview

Many multisport athletes employ traditional training methods, ignoring technique while relying on volume and intensity of workouts to improve results. Renowned coach Ken Mierke has coached nine national multisport champions and placed 28 multisport athletes on Team USA. His research proves that athletes who achieve optimal technique show a remarkable difference not just in performance, but also in endurance. In this book he shows runners how to use the body's natural shock-absorption system to dramatically reduce...

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Overview

Many multisport athletes employ traditional training methods, ignoring technique while relying on volume and intensity of workouts to improve results. Renowned coach Ken Mierke has coached nine national multisport champions and placed 28 multisport athletes on Team USA. His research proves that athletes who achieve optimal technique show a remarkable difference not just in performance, but also in endurance. In this book he shows runners how to use the body's natural shock-absorption system to dramatically reduce impact stress and keep their training injury-free. By maximizing both conditioning and technique, as detailed in this book, runners can become faster, stronger, and more efficient athletes.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781931382601
  • Publisher: VeloPress
  • Publication date: 2/28/2005
  • Series: Ultrafit Multisport Training Series
  • Pages: 200
  • Sales rank: 1,084,028
  • Product dimensions: 6.26 (w) x 9.12 (h) x 0.70 (d)

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3.5
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Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 21, 2005

    This is Pose Method in disguise

    I ran out to the store, thinking someone has finally made a breakthrough. No, in fact, they went backwards. While I wasn't interested in the training part, I was interested in the Running Technique part. One thing I realized almost instantly is that this so called evolution running is essentially a chopped up version of the Pose Method of Running, with the sole difference being 'propulsion.' What¿s more is that Joe Friel, Mierki¿s apparent mentor is an advocate of the Pose Method as stated in his book Triathlete¿s Trianing Bible. As I've understood by what Ken Mierki has said, 'Evolution Running teaches runners how to develop horizontal propulsion using the large muscles of the hips instead of the smaller, weaker muscles of the thighs.' By what stretch of the imagination are the thigh muscles small? There are some other obvious mistakes that I think anyone in physics should know... You cannot push something that is running away from you. Ken claims that you create horizontal propulsion by exerting extra force, after you land. If your GCM is no longer above your point of support, it makes no sense to push, or if you are on support and you push, you run into vertical displacement which he regards to as wrong. If done correctly, I see some pretty nice chronic injuries developed through Evolution Running. Does anyone else see holes in this Evolution Running Theory? I did not like how Mierke seemed very vague or broad in his explanations, especially with no proof of any sort other than ¿we¿ve done tests that show¿¿ Where are these tests Ken?!? Only the first few chapters deal with Running Technique, the rest of the book is Lactate training and other methods. The book has some good overall advice, but nothing that can¿t be found on the internet for free. There are some cookie cutter training plans and/or workouts. But unless you¿re a top level triathlete, it¿s not going to benefit you now is it? Overall this book was rather disappointing.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 12, 2009

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