The Trouble I've Seen

The Trouble I've Seen

by Martha Gellhorn
     
 

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These four interlinked stories encapsulate Martha Gellhorn's firsthand observation of the Great Depression. Fiction crafted with documentary accuracy, they vividly render the gradual spiritual collapse of the simple, homely sufficiency of American life in the face of sudden unemployment, desperate poverty and hopelessness. They catch the mood of a generation 'sucked

Overview

These four interlinked stories encapsulate Martha Gellhorn's firsthand observation of the Great Depression. Fiction crafted with documentary accuracy, they vividly render the gradual spiritual collapse of the simple, homely sufficiency of American life in the face of sudden unemployment, desperate poverty and hopelessness. They catch the mood of a generation 'sucked into indifference' and of young men who no longer 'believe in man or God, let alone private industry'. Martha was the youngest of a squad of sixteen, handpicked reporters who were paid to file accurate, confidential reports on the human stories behind the statistics of the Depression directly to Roosevelt's White House. In these pages, we understand the real cost of sudden destitution on a vast scale. We taste the dust in the mouth, smell the disease and feel the hopelessness and the despair. And here, too, we can hear the earliest cadences of the voice of a writer who went on to become, arguably, the greatest female war reporter of the 20th century.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781906011871
Publisher:
Eland Publishing
Publication date:
05/18/2012
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
256
Sales rank:
1,241,004
File size:
404 KB

Meet the Author

Martha Gellhorn (1908?98) published five novels, fourteen novellas and two collections of short stories. She wanted to be remembered as a novelist, yet to most people she is remembered as an outstanding war correspondent. She covered almost every major conflict from the Spanish Civil War to the American invasion of Panama in1989. For a woman it was completely ground-breaking work, and she took it on with an absolute commitment to the truth. ‘All politicians are bores and liars and fakes. I talk to people,’ she said, explaining her paramount interest in war’s civilian victims, the unseen casualties. She was one of the great war correspondents, one of the great witnesses, of the twentieth century. She was a woman of strong opinions and incredible energy. Though she turned down reporting on the Bosnian war in her 80s, saying she wasn’t nimble enough, she flew to Brazil at the age of eighty-seven to research and write an article about the murder of street children. Touchtyping although she could barely see, she was driven by a compassion for the powerless and a curiosity undimmed by age.

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