The Trouble with Christmas

The Trouble with Christmas

4.0 1
by Tom Flynn
     
 

In The Trouble with Christmas Tom Flynn challenges America's most popular sacred cow. Alternately outrageous, satirical, and thoughtful, this rollicking critique calls Christmas to account. How many holiday traditions are authentically Christian? (Next to none.). Does the contemporary Christmas holiday have ancient roots? (Hardly. It was largely invented by six…  See more details below

Overview

In The Trouble with Christmas Tom Flynn challenges America's most popular sacred cow. Alternately outrageous, satirical, and thoughtful, this rollicking critique calls Christmas to account. How many holiday traditions are authentically Christian? (Next to none.). Does the contemporary Christmas holiday have ancient roots? (Hardly. It was largely invented by six eminent Victorians.). Is the Santa Claus myth unhealthy for children? (Yes, Virginia.). Are Christmas critics discriminated against? (Is "Scrooge" an insult?). What is the future of Christmas as America becomes a multicultural, multifaith society? (Educators should start sweating now.). The Trouble with Christmas is not only for curmudgeons, but for citizens, parents, teachers, and freethinkers of every stripe. Anyone curious about the origins and future of one of the Western world's most celebrated holidays will find something of interest in this provocative book.

Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
Flynn, the associate editor of Free Inquiry and an avowed atheist, has written an argument for the downsizing of Christmas as a national holiday in view of the diverse nature of America's population. Providing extensive footnotes, Flynn devotes approximately half of this work to dispelling any ``fond notions'' anyone may have about Christmas, from Jesus and Santa to Christmas trees to poinsettias. The second portion of the book, which deals with the difficulties of celebrating Christmas in a democratic, multicultural society, raises an important issue: There are many who choose not to celebrate Christmas; thus, continuing to expect everyone to participate in or be tolerant of a religious holiday in which they do not believe is unrealistic and undemocratic. Flynn's point is valid, but a better alternative to reducing the holiday might be to educate those who observe it in the needs and concerns of those who do not.-- Joanna M. Thompson, Bluefield State Coll . , Bluefield, W . Va.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780879758486
Publisher:
Prometheus Books
Publication date:
10/28/1993
Pages:
1
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.53(d)

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The Trouble with Christmas 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I don't celebrate Christmas. If this makes me a 'Scrooge' or a 'Grinch', then maybe you should take a look at chapter 9... Tom Flynn's book will be of great interest to anyone who has ever thought that maybe Christmas isn't all that it's cracked up to be. Jehovah's Witnesses, Jews, Muslims and Athiests are a diverse group, but the one thing they have in common is not 'fitting' in during the biggest party of the year. Mr. Flynn covers all the basics: lying to you children about Santa is not only wrong, but pointless (why not let your kids love YOU for buying those gifts?); other holidays (such as Chanukah, Kwanzaa and Yule) are forced to become as 'Christmas' as possible, almost none of the traditions associated with Christmas are Christian, Jesus wasn't even born in December, etc. In addition to this, Mr. Flynn itemizes reasons why Christmas has only in the last 100 years become such a bloated, materialistic holiday. He discusses historical figures who have had a hand in this regard. Unfortunately, Mr. Flynn closes his book by decrying religion altogether. This will probably alienate some of the very peole the book is trying to attract--such as some of the above listed groups. The final couple of chapters seem out of place and too preachy.