The Truck Comes on Thursday

The Truck Comes on Thursday

3.0 1
by Ms Sue A Hardesty
     
 

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Life sizzles for Highway Patroller Loni Wagner in a small Arizona desert town during the long summer nights. She sees it all - a plane wreck, freeway pileups, and dead bodies - as she investigates murders involving human smugglers, drug runners, and her old friend Carl. During the day, she faces high school enemies, a redneck sexist police chief who gives her unwanted

Overview

Life sizzles for Highway Patroller Loni Wagner in a small Arizona desert town during the long summer nights. She sees it all - a plane wreck, freeway pileups, and dead bodies - as she investigates murders involving human smugglers, drug runners, and her old friend Carl. During the day, she faces high school enemies, a redneck sexist police chief who gives her unwanted jobs, and worries about her Native Indian grandparents - her grandmother is not well, and cattle rustling on their ranch is about to break them. Adding spicy flavors to this mix are two intriguing women who help her struggle to move on from the death of her lover.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780979270185
Publisher:
TRP Cookbooks LLD
Publication date:
07/11/2013
Pages:
482
Product dimensions:
5.25(w) x 8.00(h) x 1.07(d)

Meet the Author

Sue Hardesty was born and raised on the Arizona desert. After college she moved to the Phoenix area and taught Communications. Retirement took her out of the desert heat as she moved to the beautiful Oregon Coast where she and her partner run their dogs on the beach every morning. And where she even takes time to write a little.

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The Truck Comes on Thursday 3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Sage320 More than 1 year ago
It's never a good thing when the cover of a book misleads the reader as to what is inside. Even a good story can be lost if the reader is focused on something else. The Truck Comes on Thursday says on the cover that it is a mystery, but fans of that genre may dispute that fact. The problem with this book is that the "mystery" is not at the heart of it. Sections about the different crimes spring up at irregular intervals and sometimes seem to be afterthoughts to what is actually going on in the book. The criminal sections are often rough, flow poorly and are at times confusing. They disrupt the pace of the book and Loni seems to make leaps to information that isn't supported by what has been told in the story. There are also long sections from a diary written by Loni's ancestor that don't seem to make much contribution to the story at all. Why this technique was included is puzzling because the information included doesn't add to the narration. At the heart of this book is a more interesting story than the crimes that are committed. There is a great deal of knowledge about the ritual stories told by Indians, how they perceive relationships differently and their vision of how people should interact with the natural world. When Loni is listening to her grandparents talk about their traditions or explain Indian attitudes, the book is at its best. Hardesty also obviously knows the geography and culture of the area well enough to make her descriptions very vivid and to give insight into some of the problems that exist along the US-Mexico border. At times the reader may feel that what Hardesty really wanted to write was the story of that area, with an emphasis on how the Indians have been mistreated and survived. It is clear that she feels a great injustice has been done and that should have been explored more. That stronger story is diluted by the episodes that are thrown in about the crimes. Mystery fans often complain that books are placed in that genre, but the mystery is a thin conveyance for romance or something else. That may be the reaction to this one. If the book is approached as being full of interesting tidbits about Indian culture and experiences, plus a glimpse of life in the US Southwest, it's much more satisfying. Hardesty could have left out the criminal parts and made a better story because it would have had a totally different and sharper focus.