The Truck Food Cookbook: 150 Recipes and Ramblings from America's Best Restaurants on Wheels
  • The Truck Food Cookbook: 150 Recipes and Ramblings from America's Best Restaurants on Wheels
  • The Truck Food Cookbook: 150 Recipes and Ramblings from America's Best Restaurants on Wheels

The Truck Food Cookbook: 150 Recipes and Ramblings from America's Best Restaurants on Wheels

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by John T. Edge
     
 

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It’s the best of street food: bold, delicious, surprising, over-the-top goodness to eat on the run. And the best part is now you can make it at home. Obsessively researched by food authority John T. Edge, The Truck Food Cookbook delivers 150 recipes from America’s best restaurants on wheels, from L.A. and New York to the truck food scenes in

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Overview

It’s the best of street food: bold, delicious, surprising, over-the-top goodness to eat on the run. And the best part is now you can make it at home. Obsessively researched by food authority John T. Edge, The Truck Food Cookbook delivers 150 recipes from America’s best restaurants on wheels, from L.A. and New York to the truck food scenes in Portland, Austin, Minneapolis, and more.

John T. Edge shares the recipes, special tips, and techniques. And what a menu-board: Tamarind-Glazed Fried Chicken Drummettes. Kalbi Beef Sliders. Porchetta. The lily-gilding Grilled Cheese Cheeseburger. A whole chapter’s worth of tacos—Mexican, Korean, Chinese fusion. Plus sweets, from Sweet Potato Cupcakes to an easy-to-make Cheater Soft-Serve Ice Cream. Hundreds of full-color photographs capture the lively street food gestalt and its hip and funky aesthetic, making this both an insider’s cookbook and a document of the hottest trend in American food.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Edge, a roving food writer for the New York Times, has eaten his way across all the top food truck–friendly cities of the U.S., from Seattle and Portland, Ore., to Madison, Wis., and Minneapolis, down to Austin, Tex., and up to Philly and New York City. He presents 150 of his favorite recipes, taken either directly from the vendors when they were willing to divulge their secrets, or else recreated by his colleague, and the book’s photographer, Angie Mosier. It is not surprising that the array of snacks is multicultural in the extreme, but it is interesting to see how certain dishes have jumped the boundaries of their traditional homelands. Jambalaya turns up in Oregon, albeit a healthier than normal version made with red beets and parsnips. Jerk pork in Wisconsin gets the Sloppy Joe treatment, tossed with “store-bought Jamaican barbecue sauce” and served on a bun. And from a Japanese food cart in Philadelphia, canned tuna, mayo, soy sauce, rice, and spice are wrapped in nori and called tuna onigiri. More authentic walk and eat offerings include a traditional Frito pie from Houston, with the chili poured atop a torn open bag of chips, and L.A.-style beef tacos with tortillas dipped in lard before heating. Some of the chefs have spent too much time in their tiny work spaces: how else to explain creations such as the macaroni and cheese sandwich, and the grilled cheese cheeseburger wherein a dainty burger and some lettuce is nestled between two grilled cheese sandwiches? Agent: David Black. (May)
Kirkus Reviews
New York Times food columnist Edge (Southern Belly: The Ultimate Food Lover's Companion to the South, 2007, etc.) explores "outsider food, immigrant food, [and] the food of the underclass" in an intelligently organized cookbook featuring a smorgasbord of American street foods. In cities such as Los Angeles, Minneapolis, San Francisco, Houston and New York, the author gathered recipes that range from the familiar with an ethnic twist (sumac on tater tots) to regional fare (Portland poutine) to fast food (burgers and tacos) to healthier concoctions (Ethiopian lentils and tuna onigiri). Many employ simple ingredients, as well as flavorful sauces and marinades. Whether served in hearty or bite-sized portions, they are often characterized by their portable, comforting nature. Readers who may have initially equated "truck food" with greasy spoons will be pleasantly surprised to discover that quick methods such as deep-frying are limited, as are the more excessive creations, including a grilled cheese cheeseburger. Adventurous palates will also find fusions such as Kimchi quesadillas and crepes with chicken, veggies and coconut. Edge contextualizes his topic with well-considered introductions to each section--"Fries and Pies," "Waffles and Their Kin," "Brunch on Wheels," "Unexpected Pleasures," "Sandwich Up!, "Rolling in Sweets," etc.--and to the recipes. He also provides background on topics of interest to food-trivia enthusiasts, from the popularity of sriracha to tidbits given by the cooks he encountered. The book is especially noteworthy for its vibrant portrayal of cities as hotbeds for innovation. Despite their fleeting nature, these creations endure in a winning combination of graphic design, cross-cultural flair and writing on one of the staples of the urban food landscape.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780761156161
Publisher:
Workman Publishing Company, Inc.
Publication date:
05/08/2012
Pages:
304
Sales rank:
291,462
Product dimensions:
9.26(w) x 8.40(h) x 0.73(d)

Meet the Author

John T. Edge, a five-time James Beard Award nominee, writes the monthly “United Tastes” for The New York Times. His work for Saveur and other magazines has been featured in seven editions of the Best Food Writing compilations. He runs the Southern Foodways Alliance at the University of Mississippi. His last book was Algonquin’s Southern Belly: The Ultimate Food Lover’s Companion to the South. Mr. Edge lives with his wife and son in Oxford, Mississippi.

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The Truck Food Cookbook: 150 Recipes and Ramblings from America's Best Restaurants on Wheels 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Purchased the e-edition of this and it has horrible issues with navigation and is very cumbersome to use. Can't find any of the recipes when I want them. I am an experienced NOOK user and have used many other cookbooks and novels on multiple devices and have never experienced such issues. If you really want the cookbook head to the store and buy the paperback version because the e-version is a complete waste and Barnes & Nobles does not allow returns of NOOK Books.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
EnnaTrebmal More than 1 year ago
When I retire, I plan to purchase an excellent GPS system, pack my bags, my 2 Yorkies and my Brittany Spaniel, tank up the car and hit the road in search of the food trucks in this book!!! No aimless rambling through America for me...oh no....I will seek out these food trucks, taste their offerings, and head for the next ones. Someday, I will be standing in line at one of the trucks and this book will come up in a conversation. John T. Edge has helped me focus on my plans for a life of leisure (about 10 years from now) with his well-written and beautifully photographed truck food cookbook. This book brings the joy of the hunt and discovery of EXCELLENT truck food, the pathways traveled in the process, the lean-back to peruse the menus which can change as often as the location of the truck, the reach-up to plunk down my money on a ledge slightly over my head to pay for my choices, the ballet of balancing the purchase down into my hands, the deep inhale with both eyes and nose before THE BITE!!! I have a student who wants to be a chef. When I let him look through this book, I had to wrestle it back at the end of the class period. John T. Edge never fails to make me love the food and culture about which he writes, whether in his columns, Cornbread Nation, or as a judge on Iron Chef America. Like any true Southerner, he knows the importance of food in our culture. I can hear his easy Southern voice when he writes, almost as if his fingers lingered an extra beat or two on the keys in the same cadence of our speech. He is as much a Southern writer as he is a Southern food expert. I can only imagine the food tales around his supper table. I hope to someday become a part of the Southern Foodways Alliance and meet John. He needs to nestle down with a slice of my Mama Turner's warm prize-winning pound cake--my mama paid for us to have city water put in by selling them when I was about 3 years old.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I KANT WATE TO READ IT