The True Story Behind Lincoln's Gettysburg Address

The True Story Behind Lincoln's Gettysburg Address

by Jennifer Armstrong, Albert Lorenz
     
 

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Get the behind-the-scenes scoop on President Lincoln’s most famous speech, which still has meaning 150 years later.

In 1863, Abraham Lincoln gave one of the most important speeches in the history of the United States—the Gettysburg Address. It wasn’t even much a speech, really. Just a few remarks. Not meant to be remembered.

Yet 150

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Overview

Get the behind-the-scenes scoop on President Lincoln’s most famous speech, which still has meaning 150 years later.

In 1863, Abraham Lincoln gave one of the most important speeches in the history of the United States—the Gettysburg Address. It wasn’t even much a speech, really. Just a few remarks. Not meant to be remembered.

Yet 150 years later, those few remarks have been remembered. How come? What was the true meaning behind them? Where did they come from? Why is it so important that we never forget what President Lincoln said on that cold November day?

Originally published as A Three-Minute Speech, this concise, illustrated exploration of a momentous historical event is both fascinating and easy to read.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Barbara L. Talcroft
With the film Lincoln offering a close-up look at the Civil War president, teachers and parents will welcome a new edition of Armstrong's A Three-Minute Speech for young readers who would like more information about Lincoln's famous "appropriate remarks." Prolific writer Armstrong (winner of the 1999 Orbis Pictus Award for nonfiction) takes readers behind the scenes at Gettysburg, while providing them enough history to understand the idea of a "new nation, conceived in liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal." In a clear, conversational tone, the author informs young historians of events leading up to the Civil War, Lincoln's election, and his ideas about slavery, including those expressed in debates with Stephen Douglas. She stresses Union losses in the war and the terrible battle ending on July 3, 1863. Surely, a cemetery for the dead required a special ceremony with oratory worthy of the occasion! Armstrong points out that, in contrast to main speaker Edward Everett's two-hour oration, Lincoln's three-minute masterpiece of dedication and faith in an undivided nation is the one we remember. Interspersed among sections of the text, Lincoln's words from the Gettysburg Address become clear—Armstrong concludes with the concept that Lincoln had "dedicated the whole war." Interesting also are a chapter on myths that arose about the speech (Lincoln did not jot it down casually on an envelope) and a history of the many copies that were made. Artist Lorenz's detailed black-and-white sketches of people, battles, and a newspaper article add life and period flavor. For actual images from the Civil War, kids may enjoy Armstrong's Photo by Brady: A Picture of the Civil War (2005). Reviewer: Barbara L. Talcroft

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781442493889
Publisher:
Aladdin
Publication date:
09/03/2013
Pages:
96
Product dimensions:
5.50(w) x 8.20(h) x 0.60(d)
Age Range:
7 - 10 Years

Read an Excerpt

The True Story Behind Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address


  • IN THE BEGINNING were the British colonies in North America, separated by an ocean from the land they had left behind. Over the years the colonists became less and less British and more and more something new: American. Here, a man or a woman was not judged by his family or her title. Instead they were judged by their actions. There were no lords or dukes or baronesses. Here, no family deserved more wealth or more land or more opportunity than anyone else simply because they had an aristocratic ancestor. Those ancestors were buried in the ground an ocean away. Their voices did not reach across the Atlantic to demand special treatment. Here on the American continent people earned their place.

    Not only that, but the colonists felt they had earned something else: the right to decide for themselves what should happen on this side of the great ocean.

    The colonists wished to create their own laws.

    The king said no.

    The colonists wished to have some say in the government that collected taxes from them.

    The king said no.

    The colonists wished to choose their own judges.

    The king said no.

    The colonists wished for this, that, and another reasonable thing. To each request the king said no. Picture a father snapping at his children, telling them to be quiet and go to their rooms and stop asking so many questions.

    The colonists were beginning to wonder why they should continue to be ruled this way. Every child outgrows the authority of the parent. The American colonies had finally grown up. They no longer wished to be ruled by a king who was so far away he might as well live in a fairy story. It was time to make a new nation, a nation whose only parent would be freedom. This nation would steer its course by a revolutionary idea: All people were created equal. It would be a democracy, a government of the people, not an aristocracy, a government of kings and princely lords. That was the idea the country would dedicate itself to.

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