The Truth about Breast Implants

The Truth about Breast Implants

by Randolph H. Guthrie
     
 

A prominent plastic surgeon and an award-winning health journalist clearly describe all available breast reconstruction and enhancement techniques, discussing the pros and cons of each. Features the latest research regarding the dangers of such methods as silicone implants and tissue transfer. Provides excellent, sensitive advice on finding the right doctor,

Overview

A prominent plastic surgeon and an award-winning health journalist clearly describe all available breast reconstruction and enhancement techniques, discussing the pros and cons of each. Features the latest research regarding the dangers of such methods as silicone implants and tissue transfer. Provides excellent, sensitive advice on finding the right doctor, supplies questions to ask a doctor and explains step-by-step what to expect during both reconstruction and enlargement procedures. Actual case studies illuminate women's concerns and feelings.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
For the past 30 years, more than a million American women have received silicone gel-filled breast implants. Some physicians have placed these devices in their patients without providing adequate information on the risks posed by the procedure, and without demanding information from manufacturers. Of women receiving implants, 40 percent have experienced serious complications: silicone leakage into the body; capsular contacture (development of hardened scar tissues around the implant); immune system disorders believed to be linked to the implants. Guthrie, a plastic surgeon specializing in breast surgery, explains that he has opposed the use of silicone implants since the late 1970s, long before the current controversy. Under the current FDA rule, women who want implants after reconstructive surgery may get them if they are willing to be part of a long-term study to check for health problems. Those who seek implants to enlarge their breasts for cosmetic reasons are much more restricted; they may not do so unless they are chosen to join in a similar study examining the long-term effects of the silicone devices. Guthrie believes that saline implants offer a safe alternative. Available for 20 years, they have only been used in 10%-15% of breast reconstruction or augmentation procedures. The author's advocacy of saline implants is unwavering, but still one questions the wisdom of putting any foreign objects in the body, especially in cases when it is for vanity and vanity alone. (Feb.)
Library Journal
The use of silicone implants is an area clouded by emotion and conflicting information, even within the medical community. The introductory blurb for Guthrie's book suggests it might help to clear up some of this confusion. Sadly, it falls short of that goal. Though Guthrie is a noted expert in the field, his complete lack of documentation weakens his credibility. In an area this controversial, where documentation is essential, he repeatedly mentions studies or reports but fails to give citations. In addition, while Guthrie does cover some of the issues surrounding silicone implants, he does so only briefly. For the most part, the book comes off as an advertisement for saline implants, though it could have been an excellent resource on such implants with a little documentation. An optional purchase for women's health collections. See also Frank Vasey and Josh Feldstein's The Silicone Breast Implant Controversy ( LJ 11/15/93) and Nancy Bruning's Breast Implants ( LJ 9/15/92).--Ed.-- KellyJo Houtz Griffin, Harrison Memorial Hosp., Bremerton, Wash.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780471594185
Publisher:
Wiley
Publication date:
01/28/1994
Pages:
145
Product dimensions:
5.97(w) x 8.96(h) x 0.46(d)

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >