The Truth About Twelve

The Truth About Twelve

by Theresa Golding
     
 

Twelve-year-old Lindy has a secret that she both longs to share and fears admitting. In her new town she is safe from others' knowledge of her past, but she cannot ignore the guilt that permeates her thoughts. With a dilapidated house she wants to hide and a little brother who refused to leave her alone, Lindy must cope with the loss that has left her father silent

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Overview

Twelve-year-old Lindy has a secret that she both longs to share and fears admitting. In her new town she is safe from others' knowledge of her past, but she cannot ignore the guilt that permeates her thoughts. With a dilapidated house she wants to hide and a little brother who refused to leave her alone, Lindy must cope with the loss that has left her father silent and strange and her family reeling. Lindy's guilt is balanced by humor, and Golding's engaging novel will catch and hold the attention of even the most reluctant reader.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature
Twelve-year-old Lindy Perkins hates her rundown home in the suburbs and longs for her old neighborhood in Philadelphia. Middle readers soon discover that Lindy's family is in deep trouble; her tired mother works as a cleaner in the local hospital; her withdrawn father does not work, but collects roadside junk for sculptures. Although her teenage brother makes friends, Lindy lives in fear that her wealthy classmates will find out her address or identify the trash sculptor as her father. Fortunately, Lindy excels in baseball, so the suburban kids and teachers put up with her evasiveness and feisty independence, but Lindy has a secret. Readers get a tantalizing series of hints about an absent sister, Lindy's feelings of guilt, and the reason for her father's silence and withdrawal. They will probably breathe a sigh of relief when the unhappy situation is finally resolved and a more mature Lindy can look forward to a happier life, but readers never do find out exactly what happened (or how or why), leaving them with a sense of uncertainty and frustration. Lindy is an appealing character and her struggle for acceptance will evoke similar feelings in many preteens, although those who do not share her love for baseball may find the sports metaphors less than riveting. As in many coming-of-age stories, things are definitely looking up for Lindy and the rest of her family by the end of the last chapter, but the solutions fall into place a bit too suddenly and completely for total belief. 2004, Boyds Mills Press, Ages 10 up.
—Barbara L. Talcroft
School Library Journal
Gr 6-8-Through a compelling, caustic, first-person narration, Lindy Perkins shares her pain, guilt, and shame as her family tries to recover from the accidental death of her infant sister. She has other secrets to hide from her schoolmates in her new town: her run-down house is in a neighborhood of new, expensive homes; the months her family lived in a homeless shelter; and her bereft father is ridiculed by the community for scavenging materials for his bizarre sculptures. Lindy lives for softball, and she has tremendous talent, yet even that is threatened when she avoids homework, copies a friend's math assignments, forges her parents' signatures, shoots paper clips at those who sit in front of her, and beans a teammate who makes an insulting comment at practice. Perhaps it is Lindy's sharp comments, wry wit, or athletic prowess that prompt two of her classmates to befriend her-it certainly isn't her efforts to reach out to them. Readers will appreciate the wonderful softball descriptions and infusions of suspense and humor, and may not mind the forced, tidy ending in this story of tragedy and family dysfunction.-Laura Scott, Farmington Community Library, MI Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
Consumed with guilt over the accidental death of her little sister and embarrassed by the poor living conditions and emotional fragility of her badly battered family, Lindy Perkins weaves a web of lies at her new, upscale school, then slowly, inexorably gets tangled in the sticky threads of her own falsehoods. It's a masterful performance, and the read is agonizingly suspenseful as the author gradually increases both the familial and social pressure on her fiercely struggling, down-but-not-willing-to-be-out heroine. Golding doesn't reveal Lindy's terrible secret until near the end of the story. The revelation doesn't quite match the buildup, and because it's almost at the conclusion, the near-happy ending feels rushed. But her depiction of the "crazy upside-down roller-coaster ride" dynamics of 12-the friendships, rivalries, crushes, and little and big social slights-is almost unbearably real as is her sympathetic understanding of the human condition. (Fiction. 10-12)

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781590782910
Publisher:
Highlights Press
Publication date:
09/01/2004
Pages:
176
Product dimensions:
5.80(w) x 8.52(h) x 0.83(d)
Age Range:
10 - 18 Years

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