The Tsarina's Daughter: A Novel

Overview

It is 1989 and Daria Gradov is an elderly grandmother living in the rural West. But she is not who she claims to be—the widow of a Russian immigrant of modest means. In actuality she began her life as the Grand Duchess Tatiana, known as Tania to her parents, Tsar Nicholas II and Tsarina Alexandra.

At the heart of the story is young Tania, who lives a life of incomparable luxury in pre-Revolutionary Russia. When her younger brother is diagnosed with hemophilia and the key to his ...

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Overview

It is 1989 and Daria Gradov is an elderly grandmother living in the rural West. But she is not who she claims to be—the widow of a Russian immigrant of modest means. In actuality she began her life as the Grand Duchess Tatiana, known as Tania to her parents, Tsar Nicholas II and Tsarina Alexandra.

At the heart of the story is young Tania, who lives a life of incomparable luxury in pre-Revolutionary Russia. When her younger brother is diagnosed with hemophilia and the key to his survival lies in the mysterious power of the illiterate monk Rasputin, it is merely an omen of much worse things to come. Soon war breaks out and revolution sweeps the family from power and into claustrophobic imprisonment in Siberia. Into Tania’s world comes a young soldier whose life she helps to save and who becomes her partner in daring plans to rescue the imperial family from certain death.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly

Historical maven Erickson (The Hidden Diary of Marie Antoinette) delivers a top-notch narrative featuring beautiful and courageous Tatiana Romanov, daughter of Nicholas and Alexandra, during the final years of their reign. As life becomes increasingly bleak in prerevolution Russia, Tatiana sneaks out of the palace and sees firsthand the poverty and violence pervading her country. With Communist rebels shouting for equality and enemy countries invading, Tatiana befriends a young and destitute pregnant woman whose fiancé has just been murdered by Cossacks, opening up her conscience in unexpected ways. But as the czar falters and the czarina takes refuge from her afflictions in the company of Father Gregory (better known as Rasputin), Tatiana finds solace in the arms of a fierce patriot. Erickson creates an entirely convincing historical backdrop, and her tale of a family's fall from power and a country in transition is both romantic and gripping. (Oct.)

Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Library Journal

Erickson (The Hidden Diary of Marie Antoinette; The Secret Life of Josephine) weaves historical details into this imaginative account of how Tatiana Romanov, the second of Nicholas and Alexandra's four daughters, escaped the Bolshevik assassins who killed Russia's royal family in 1918. As an elderly woman living in Canada, Tatiana recounts events from her life in pre-revolutionary Russia. Her interest in the lives of servants and others beyond the royal circle leads to her clandestine attempts to help cold, hungry Russians who grow increasingly resentful of the royal family. However, her parents refuse to acknowledge the changing political realities. Nicholas, an inept commander and weak ruler, indulges in personal pleasures, while Alexandra relies on the mystical powers of Rasputin to keep her hemophiliac son alive. In addition, Tatiana's tyrannical grandmother, self-centered sisters, and a bevy of royal relatives throughout Europe engage in romantic and political intrigues that affect the fates of individuals and nations. Tatiana's liaison with a military man loyal to the tsar and the devotion of a poor woman she had helped lead to her unlikely rescue. Despite knowing the real Tatiana's fate, readers will rejoice in the fictional version's survival. A sure winner for public library fans of historical romance. [Library marketing campaign.]
—Kathy Piehl

Kirkus Reviews
A wish-fulfillment fantasy about another Romanov who survived Ekaterinburg, this time the Tsar's second daughter, Tatiana. Forensic science has squelched speculation about whether or not any of Tsar Nicholas II and Empress Alexandra's five children escaped assassination by Bolsheviks in 1918. Erickson, who has carved out a niche in the historical genre for what she styles "historical entertainments" (e.g. The Secret Life of Josephine, 2007, etc.), never lets harsh fact impede a good story. Instead of the usual suspect, Anastasia, Erickson's surviving Grand Duchess is Tatiana (aka Tania), now 93, living in obscurity in the West under the assumed name Daria Gradov. Tania has resolved to tell the world that the Romanov line did not die out. Flashback to pre-World War I St. Petersburg. The increasingly neurasthenic Alexandra has finally produced a male heir, but unfortunately, Tsarevich Alexei is born with hereditary hemophilia. Tania, at first preoccupied with typical princess concerns-French lessons, dancing instruction, ball gowns and draconian posture improvement administered by her overbearing Grandma Minnie-senses that her father's throne is threatened. An attempt on Nicholas's life sparked a major riot and Cossack rampage, and her Uncle Gega was blown to bits by a carriage bomb. As war approaches, Alexandra, when she's not outraging the public with her German nationality and affinity for the rakish faith healer Rasputin, does her patriotic duty. Tania, meanwhile, toils tending wounded soldiers, like young Georgian Michael, whom she cures with Rasputin's healing stick. Michael, with his Adonis-like physique (except for that nasty chest wound), is this romance's Fabio. After exchangingidentities with servant Daria, who then dies alongside her employers, Tania flees to Canada with Michael. Although the particulars of the Romanovs' fall are familiar from other treatments, including Erickson's biography of Alexandra, the suspense never flags, despite many improbabilities. More entertainment than history, but all the better for it.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780312551223
  • Publisher: St. Martin's Press
  • Publication date: 9/30/2008
  • Pages: 336
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 9.10 (h) x 0.90 (d)

Meet the Author

Among Carolly Erickson’s twenty-five critically acclaimed, prize-winning, bestselling books are biographies, histories and the recent series of fictional historical entertainments. Her range is wide, her audience worldwide. She lives in Hawaii.

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Read an Excerpt

Chapter One

My story begins at the extreme edge of memory, on a snowy January afternoon when I was six years old, and it seemed as if all the bells in all the churches of St. Petersburg were ringing at once.

I remember my father lifted me up so I could see over the top of the balcony railing, and I felt the freezing wind on my face and saw, through the greenish-yellow fog, a crowd of people such as I had never seen before.

The mass of people, all singing and shouting and waving flags and banners, seemed to stretch as far as I could see, all across the Palace Square and beyond, out toward the corners of the avenues and even along the bridge across the river.

"Batiushka! Batiushka!" they were shouting. "Little Father!" Though the noise of their shouting seemed to dissolve into the resonant clanging of the bells and the singing of "God Save the Tsar."

It was my name day, or near it, the Feast of the Holy Martyr Tatiana of Rome who lived in the time of the Caesars, and at first I thought they were all shouting and singing to celebrate my name day feast, so I waved and smiled and thought, how kind they all are, to show such joy at my feast day.

But of course it was not my name day that they were celebrating, it was something much more important, as I found out later.

My father put me down but I could still see through the open stonework of the balustrade and I could still hear the tremendous commotion. People began singing "Holy Russia" and chanting "Hail to the Russian army and fleet" and clapping as they chanted, though their poor hands must have been raw from the cold. Mother led us back through the glass doors into the White Hall and we thawed ourselves in front of the fire.

She smiled at us and gave us hot milk and plates of warm buns with honey and icing. We were all happy that day because she had just told us a wonderful secret: that we would soon have a baby brother.

There were four of us girls in the family, in that winter of l904. I was six, as I have already said, Olga had just turned eight, fat little Marie was four and the baby, Anastasia, was two and a half. Everybody said we needed a brother and mama assured us that we would soon have one, no matter what stories our Grandma Minnie told. (Grandma Minnie was unkind to mama, and always said she could only have girls.)

"Is it because our little brother is coming that all the people are shouting and all the bells are ringing?" I asked.

"No, Tania. It is because they love Russia and they love us, especially your dear papa."

"I heard Chemodurov say it was because of the war," Olga said, in her most grown-up, know-it-all voice. Chemodurov was my father’s valet and the source of all Olga’s information at that time.

"Hush! We leave such things to your father." Mama spoke crisply, and gave Olga a look that made her frown and sulk, though she did obey and said nothing more.

"How was your dancing lesson, Tania?" mama asked, changing the subject. "Did you manage to avoid stepping on Olga’s feet?"

"Professor Leitfelter says I am a good dancer," I said proudly. "I keep good time with my feet."

Olga and I went to dancing class twice a week at the Vorontzov Institute for Young Noblewomen. With forty other girls, all of us dressed in identical long white pinafores and pink linen underskirts, we stepped and twirled, promenaded and bowed to the music of a grand piano, while our dancing master walked up and down, correcting our form and clapping his hands irritably when we failed to keep in step.

I loved dancing class. Everything about it pleased me, from the beautiful high-ceilinged immaculately white ballroom in which it was held, with its grand marble columns and its immense chandeliers, to the gold-framed portraits that looked down on us from the walls while we danced, to the grace of the best dancers and the carefree feeling the movements brought out in me.

Among those other girls I was no longer a grand duchess, fussed over by nursemaids and servants. I was just one of forty identical girls, treated no differently from the others just because I was the emperor’s daughter. (Professor Leitfelter was equally strict with us all.) For as long as the class lasted I yielded, happily, to the flow of the music and drifted away.

On the following day the immense crowds formed again in Palace Square and out beyond it. Once again the church bells rang and the people sang and shouted, and my father led us all out onto the balcony to receive their tribute.

"I’ve never seen anything like it," my father said to us all at tea that afternoon. "Such huge demonstrations of support, such outpourings of love and affection for the nation—"

"And the dynasty. Don’t forget that," my mother interrupted. "It is for the house of Romanov, and for you, Nicky."

My father smiled gently, as he always did when reminded that he, the emperor, was the focus of veneration.

"My people are loyal," he said. "They may complain, they may go on strike and march in protest and even throw bombs, but when the nation needs them, they respond. I’m told there are crowds like this in ever town," he went on. "Men are rushing to volunteer for army service. Contributions are pouring in, tens of thousands of rubles. And all because we are at war with Japan."

"We will win, won’t we, papa?" I asked.

"Of course, Tania. Only the British have a finer navy than we do. Though Cousin Willy has many fine ships as well." Mama’s cousin Willy was Kaiser Wilhelm, ruler of Germany. I had seen pictures of him in mama’s study, a burly, angry-looking man. Mama didn’t like him.

For many days the crowds came to cheer and sing, and we all went out on the balcony to smile and wave. But papa, who always looked a little sad except when he was taking a long walk or riding his bicycle or chopping wood, began to look very sad, and before long the noise and the singing stopped, though there were still many people in Palace Square, looking up toward the balcony or talking among themselves.

Olga told me that some of our big Russian ships had been sunk by the Japanese. A lot of men had drowned, she said, and I thought, no wonder papa looks sad.

"There is a war. A terrible war. And we are losing. Chemodurov says so."

I remember being confused, and being sorry to see my father’s sad face (for he could be very jolly), and the next thing I remember was the day my baby brother was born.

On that day, in the morning, we children were sent upstairs to the nursery, out of the way, and were told that mama had gone into Grandma Minnie’s bedroom, to lie in her bed.

"All the tsars of Russia have been born in that bed," our nursemaid told us. "Your father, and your grandfather, who was strong as an ox, and your sainted great-grandfather, the one who was blown all to pieces by that awful man."

It was not long before the guns in the Peter and Paul Fortress began going off and we knew that our little brother had come into the world. We were allowed to go downstairs to see mama and the little baby. Mama was lying back on the soft pillows of the bed and looking very tired, the way she looked when her head hurt. Yet she looked beautiful, with her lovely face softened by fatigue and her rich dark blond hair spread out all over the lace-trimmed pillow. She smiled at us and held out her hands.

Beside the bed a golden cradle flamed in the sunlight. Next to the cradle sat one of the nursery maids, gently rocking it with her foot. I remember peering down into the cradle and seeing there, beneath a purple velvet coverlet embroidered in gold, our new brother, asleep.

"Alexei," mama said quietly. "We are going to call him Alexei. The eighth Romanov to sit on the throne of all the Russias. Now, that is something to celebrate."

Excerpted from The Book of The Tsarina's Daughter by Carolly Erichson

Copyright © 2008 by Carolly Erickson

Published in 2008 by St. Martin’s Press

All rights reserved. This work is protected under copyright laws and reproduction is strictly prohibited. Permission to reproduce the material in any manner or medium must be secured from the Publisher

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Interviews & Essays

An Interview with Carolly Erickson

Q. The Romanovs continue to capture the imagination of the world; why do you think that is?

A. Their execution was so brutal and tragic -- and, many believe, so undeserved. The idea of a loving, close-knit family, a family wealthy beyond imagining yet drawn together by the simple joys of affection, faith, and an abiding concern for one another, being gunned down in cold blood by radical revolutionaries is chilling.

If the fate of the Romanovs is seen from the perspective of vast historical movements, then it was perhaps inevitable. Despotic power such as was wielded by the Romanov family, and the human evils it gave rise to, cried out to be destroyed, especially given the rising power of democratic and egalitarian ideas and the revolutionaries who translated these ideas into action. But the stark and cruel act that ended the Romanov's power was the murder of a mother, father and their children. It is this image that remains indelible, and shocking.

Q. The settings of the imperial court and revolutionary Russia are so imaginatively and richly portrayed in The Tsarina's Daughter. How did you manage to revivify these long-lost scenes?

A. Fortunately for the historian and novelist, the last decades of the Romanov monarchy are preserved in abundant photographs, portraits, early films, diaries, letters and the dispatches of diplomats, among other records. Even so, it requires a great conceptual leap for twenty-first-century readers, most of whom live modest lives compared to the grandeur of the Romanov monarchy, to put themselves into the ballrooms and dining halls and great gilded palaces of the rulers. Small episodes such as Empress Alexandra's casual scattering of her priceless diamond rings when she took them off to play one of her many grand pianos, give the flavor of the times, as do written and pictorial descriptions of the conditions under which ordinary Russians -- villagers, urban dwellers, factory workers -- lived.

Q. How did you come to choose Tatiana as the narrator of her family's story?

A. In Romanov family photos, in the family's diary records and the comments of observers, Tatiana emerges as the most sensitive and intuitive of the children. Based on what is known about her, I thought she would have been the most likely of the sisters to break out of the confines of royal life and explore the larger world -- and to dare to survive. Of course it must be stressed that the Tatiana of The Tsarina's Daughter is a fictional creation and that her story is a historical entertainment, blending fact and invention.

Q. Can you say a few words about your portrayal of the enigmatic Father Gregory, known as Rasputin?

A. Russian spirituality is rich in individuals who possess unexplained powers or who channels power greater than they themselves are. Rasputin was one such remarkable person, a mysterious mixture of gifts and impulses that included the ability to heal or alleviate disease, an unmistakable charisma that contained both light and dark force, an appealing childlike artlessness and an appalling taste for debauchery. His fissured nature confused those around him. They tended to see in him cloudy reflections of their own best and worst qualities, their purest faith and their most degrading vices.
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