The Tube Has Spoken: Reality TV and History

Overview

Featuring ordinary people, celebrities, game shows, hidden cameras, everyday situations, and humorous or dramatic situations, reality TV is one of the fastest growing and important popular culture trends of the past decade, with roots reaching back to the days of radio. The Tube Has Spoken provides an analysis of the growing phenomenon of reality TV, its evolution as a genre, and how it has been shaped by cultural history. This collection of essays looks at a wide spectrum of shows airing from the 1950s to the ...
See more details below
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (12) from $5.92   
  • New (4) from $9.82   
  • Used (8) from $5.92   

Overview

Featuring ordinary people, celebrities, game shows, hidden cameras, everyday situations, and humorous or dramatic situations, reality TV is one of the fastest growing and important popular culture trends of the past decade, with roots reaching back to the days of radio. The Tube Has Spoken provides an analysis of the growing phenomenon of reality TV, its evolution as a genre, and how it has been shaped by cultural history. This collection of essays looks at a wide spectrum of shows airing from the 1950s to the present, addressing some of the most popular programs including Alan Funt's Candid Camera, Big Brother, Wife Swap, Kid Nation, and The Biggest Loser. It offers both a multidisciplinary approach and a cross-cultural perspective, considering Australian, Canadian, British, and American programs. In addition, the book explores how popular culture shapes modern western values; for example, both An American Family and its British counterpart, The Family, showcase the decline of the nuclear family in response to materialistic pressures and the modern ethos of individualism. This collection highlights how reality TV has altered the tastes and values of audiences in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. It analyzes how reality TV programs reflect the tensions between the individual and the community, the transformative power of technology, the creation of the celebrity, and the breakdown of public and private spheres.
Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
Since the groundbreaking introduction of Candid Camera in 1948, reality shows have continued to provide a subtly complex interplay of entertainment, social commentary, and standard setting within a variety of areas. Here, Taddeo (Lytton Strachey and the Search for Modern Sexual Identity) and Dvorak, the former president of the American Culture Association, have collected a representative mix of essays by diverse scholars, grouping them into three major sections: reality TV as a social experiment, as a study of family culture, and as a portrayal of history. Using varied examples, contributors dissect the mechanics, people, and impact of reality TV here and abroad from a wide range of perspectives. Although critics argue that some reality TV has no substance and can be an invasion of privacy, these well-written pieces indicate otherwise by illustrating that there is more to the genre. VERDICT Cultural/media analysts and media studies students will find this of particular interest, as will those who seek a deeper understanding of contemporary culture as reflected in and shaped by television. Recommended for its breadth of thoughtful and in-depth perspectives.—Carol J. Binkowski, Bloomfield, NJ
From the Publisher

""Although critics argue that some reality TV has no substance and can be an invasion of privacy, these well-written pieces indicate otherwise by illustrating that there is more to the genre." --Library Journal" --

""The essential book on this ever-more-important topic, The Tube Has Spoken offers a wide range of essays from the top names in the field, offering new insights and a wealth of information on every page. A must-read for students, professionals, and the general public, this fascinating volume delights and surprises; it is the single best volume available on the topic to date." --Wheeler Winston Dixon, Ryan Professor of Film Studies, University of Nebraska-Lincoln" --

""A substantial contribution to the rapidly growing body of scholarly work on reality television." --Robert J. Thompson, author of Television's Second Golden Age: From Hill Street Blues to ER" --

""The scholarship throughout this volume is solid and well-considered. Its essays explore the historical precedents and social trends that inform televised 'reality,' so that we might better understand the values, beliefs, and cultural 'truths' that help shape our lived reality." --Cynthia J. Miller, scholar-in-residence at the Institute for Liberal Arts and Interdisciplinary Studies, Emerson College" --

""The tools of historical analysis offered throughout the collection are important and provide a way to consider the intertextual influence of this genre and the texts themselves as historical documents." -- Southwest Journal of Cultures" --

""A solid resource for those interested in popular culture and broadcast communication. Recommended." -- Choice" --

""The tools of historical analysis offered throughout the collection are important and provide a way to consider the intertextual influence of this genre and the texts themselves as historical documents." --= Television Book Review" --

""The strength of the individual essays produces an interdisciplinary synthesis that is palpable and satisfying."-- Film & History" --

""This edited collection offers a multidisciplinary approach to explore how reality television programming has expanded our understanding of the potential for television entertainment." -- J History" --

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780813125534
  • Publisher: University Press of Kentucky
  • Publication date: 1/3/2012
  • Series: Film and History
  • Edition description: 1
  • Pages: 275
  • Product dimensions: 6.20 (w) x 9.10 (h) x 1.10 (d)

Meet the Author

Julie Anne Taddeo is visiting associate professor of history at the University of Maryland and the author of Lytton Strachey and the Search for Modern Sexual Identity. Ken Dvorak is former president of the American Culture Association and an editorial member of the Journal of Popular Culture, Journal of American Culture, and Film & History.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Table of ContentsAcknowledgementsForewordDeborah A. Carmichael Editor's Introduction Julie Anne Taddeo and Ken Dvorak Part I Reality TV as Social Experiment Citizen Funt: Surveillance as Cold War Entertainment Fred Nadis, Independent ScholarFrom Social Experiment to Postmodern Jokes: Big Brother and the Progressive Construction of CelebrityLee Baron, Northumbria University, UK From the Kitchen to 10 Downing Street: Jamie's School Dinners and Reality Cooking James Leggott, Northumbria University, UK Tobias Hochscherf, Northumbria, University, UK The Patriotic American is a Thin American: Fatness and National Identity in The Biggest LoserCassandra L. Jones, Bowling Green State University Part II Class, Gender and Reimaging of Family Life Disillusionment, Divorce, and the Destruction of the American Dream: An American Family (1973) and the rise of Reality TelevisionLaurie Rupert, Oklahoma State UniversitySayanti Ganguly, Oklahoma State University "The television audience cannot be expected to bear too much reality…" The Family (BBC, 1974) and Reality TV Su Holmes, University of East Anglia Reality TV and the U.S. Family Leigh H. Edwards, Florida State University Shopping, Makeovers and Nationhood: Reality Television and Women's Programming in Canada Sarah A. Matheson, Brock University, Canada Babes in BonanzaLand: Kid Nation, Commodification and the Death of Play Debbie Clare Olson, Oklahoma State University Part III Reality TV and the Living History Experiment "A Storybook Everyday" : Fiction and History in the Channel 4/PBS House Series Julie Anne Taddeo, University of Maryland — College Park Ken Dvorak, Indiana Higher Education Telecommunications System Living History in Documentary Practice: The Making of The Colony Aurora Scheelings, Independent Filmmaker, Griffith University, Australia "What about giving us a real version of Australian History? " : Identity, Ethics and Historical Understanding in Reality History Television Michelle Arrow, Macquarie University, Australia

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)