The Twilight of the Old Unionism

Overview

This controversial but well-documented and deftly argued study analyzes the present and future prospects for organized labor in the private sector. Leo Troy, a leading researcher in the field of unionization trends, takes the decline of labor unions -- not just in the United States but elsewhere in the developed world -- as fact. Beginning with this premise, Troy goes on to elaborate on the extent and reasons for the decline by addressing four vital questions for readers: Can private-sector unionism, which Troy ...
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Overview

This controversial but well-documented and deftly argued study analyzes the present and future prospects for organized labor in the private sector. Leo Troy, a leading researcher in the field of unionization trends, takes the decline of labor unions -- not just in the United States but elsewhere in the developed world -- as fact. Beginning with this premise, Troy goes on to elaborate on the extent and reasons for the decline by addressing four vital questions for readers: Can private-sector unionism, which Troy identifies as "Old Unionism," ever make a comeback? If organized labor cannot recover, what are the consequences for both unionized and non-unionized workers? What is the experience of other countries, particularly Canada whose industrial relations parallels that of the United States? And, finally, what explains the international decline and change in the character of unionism? Troy concludes that the "twilight" will transform the union movement in the United States and its philosophical and political outlook. Unionism will be dominated by its public sector wing, thus altering what unions are and what they can do.
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Product Details

Table of Contents

List of Tables ix
Foreword xi
Preface xiii
Acknowledgments xv
1. The Flow and Ebb of the Old Unionism 3
From Trough to Peak, 1933-1953 3
From Peak to Twilight Zone 9
Profile of the Old Unionism 9
Rise of the New Unionism 13
2. Why Is the Old Unionism in the Twilight Zone? 15
Reasons 15
Structural Change--Economic 17
Public Employment--A Subset of the Shift from Goods to Services 28
Structural Change and Public Policy 28
Summary of Structural Changee 29
Organizing the Unorganized: Employer Opposition 29
Organizing the Unorganized: Employee Opposition 31
Is There a Representation Gap? 38
Deindustrialization or Deunionization? 43
3. Will There Be a Turnaround of the Old Unionism? 45
The Issues and the Answers 45
How to Revive the Old Unionism--According to the Unions and Their Supporters 46
Labor Law Reform 62
4. The Brave New World of the American Labor Movement 65
The Transformation of the American Labor Movement 65
Statistical Profile of the Brave New World of the Labor Movement 67
Are Municipal Collective Bargaining and Municipal Governance Compatible? 71
1. The Bankruptcy of New York City, 1975 76
2. The San Jose School District Case, 1983 80
3. The Philadelphia Story, 1992 81
Education, the Teachers' Unions, and the Living Wage 88
How Public Employees Became Organized 91
Characteristics of Local Bargaining 96
Concluding Comments on Municipal Unionism and Municipal Governance 99
Origins of the Brave New World 100
Philosophy, Policies, and Consequences of the Brave New World 108
Conclusions: The Brave New World 109
5. Is the Twilight of the Old Unionism Unique to the United States? 111
Is Canada an Exception in the Decline of the Old Unionism? 113
Two Models of Canadian Union Trends 116
Why the Canadian Experience Is Important 120
Employer Opposition 121
Concession Bargaining 123
The Canadian Public Sector Industrial Relations System 125
The Canadian Private Sector Industrial Relations System 133
The Free Trade Agreement 137
6. Is the Democratic Party the Labor Party of the United States? 139
Origin of the Argument 139
From Trade Union to Political Partner 140
The Value of Unions' In-Kind Contributions 143
Can the Union Movement Sustain $400 Million in Political Expenditures? 144
What Services Do Unions Demand from the Democratic Party? 145
Should There Be Campaign Finance Limitations on Unions? 147
7. Conclusions 153
Notes 157
Bibliography 161
Index 171
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