The Ultimate Guide to Freshwater Aquariums

The Ultimate Guide to Freshwater Aquariums

by Kevin Brown
     
 

Keeping fish at home became popular in the 80s, and with current scientific research finding incredible health benefits associated with these beautiful creatures, the hobby continues to grow.

People who tend to watch fish in an aquarium instead of the television generally have better blood pressure, eat better, and feel better about their life. They also feel…  See more details below

Overview

Keeping fish at home became popular in the 80s, and with current scientific research finding incredible health benefits associated with these beautiful creatures, the hobby continues to grow.

People who tend to watch fish in an aquarium instead of the television generally have better blood pressure, eat better, and feel better about their life. They also feel more relaxed, which can help them sleep at night, and just feel better overall. A simple aquarium has even shown beneficial for people with Alzheimer's!

Choosing where to put your tank is a very important part of getting an aquarium. The best spots are away from sunlight and drafts. The sun tends to heat an aquarium fast, and decreasing elevated water temperature quickly enough for the fish to survive is no easy feat.

Remember that you need access to electricity and water. Changing the water is a vital part of the required maintenance, so easy placement for draining and filling the tank is essential. Making the maintenance as hassle-free as possible will enhance your enjoyment of your fish tank exponentially.

You're going to want to learn about the type of fish you're interested in taking care of before you decide what substrate you want to use in your tank because some breeds like to put substrate in their mouth, and some sand can irritate and cause stress to certain fish. Larger rocks are not suitable for breeds that like to nest and burrow.

Deciding what species of fish you want in your home will determine the proper substrate. You don't have to purchase substrate, either – just boil river rocks or gravel for an hour before placing them in the tank, and they'll be fine!

Each fish actually has unique needs, ranging from food and water level to temperature, temperament, and more.

Depending on the species of fish you choose, you may want to include plants that float. Many of these are moss and fern-like plants. You’ll find them in many aquariums simply because they’re wonderful hiding places for the shy fish in your collection. In addition, floating plants make a great place for the young fry (baby fish) that need to shield themselves for protection. Floating plants also serve as a method of creating low-light conditions, since they cover the water surface. Fairy Moss is one type of floating plant.

You can also tell when your plants may be receiving an overabundance of these nutrients. Your tank experiences what’s called an “algae bloom". This is caused by the rising nitrate levels produced by the fish themselves. As you can see, the macronutrient supply takes care of itself.

Micronutrients are another matter. These elements are extremely vital and can spell the difference between health and disease. The plants only need them in very small, or trace amounts. The crucial micronutrients include copper, iron, manganese, boron, zinc and calcium.

Just as an overabundance of macronutrients can hinder and actually hurt the growth of your plants, an excess of these trace minerals can also prove detrimental.

It can be wonderful to have live plants in your aquarium, and it’s very rewarding to see that you're not only taking care of your fish, but taking care of plants for them to play in.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
2940013654402
Publisher:
Kevin Brown
Publication date:
10/18/2011
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
68
File size:
21 MB
Note:
This product may take a few minutes to download.

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