The Ultimate Shrimp Book: More than 650 Recipes for Everyone's Favorite Seafood Prepared in Every Way Imaginable (PagePerfect NOOK Book)

The Ultimate Shrimp Book: More than 650 Recipes for Everyone's Favorite Seafood Prepared in Every Way Imaginable (PagePerfect NOOK Book)

by Bruce Weinstein
     
 

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Savor the flavor of America's favorite seafood in The Ultimate Shrimp Book.

Dive into this collection of more than 650 shrimp recipes. Whether you love shrimp fried, steamed, baked, broiled, or grilled, in mole sauce, cream sauce, cocktail sauce, peanut sauce, or garlic sauce, crispy, crunchy, tender, hot, or cold, you're about to fall in love with

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Overview

Savor the flavor of America's favorite seafood in The Ultimate Shrimp Book.

Dive into this collection of more than 650 shrimp recipes. Whether you love shrimp fried, steamed, baked, broiled, or grilled, in mole sauce, cream sauce, cocktail sauce, peanut sauce, or garlic sauce, crispy, crunchy, tender, hot, or cold, you're about to fall in love with shrimp all over again. Rediscover the classics like shrimp rémoulade or go cutting edge with sweet and spicy black pepper caramel shrimp. Try shrimp twists on familiar international favorites like paprikash and vindaloo. And don't forget the crowd pleasers like shrimp nachos and popcorn shrimp. For a formal dinner, a quick family meal, or a tasty snack, The Ultimate Shrimp Book has the perfect shrimp recipe for every occasion.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Having tackled candy, ice cream and party drinks in his three previous "Ultimate" collections, Weinstein now turns his attention to what he recognizes as the "world's most popular fresh seafood." This is a Swiss Army Knife of a book, packing at least a half-dozen cuisines and more than 650 recipes into about 250 pages. To come up with so many variations upon a single crustacean, Weinstein is not above taking some everyday foods and simply adding a handful of shrimp. Thus, there are Shrimp Pizza, Shrimp Tacos and Shrimp Bruschetta. Also, buyer beware: only about one in five recipes is a unique entry. The others are simply alterations. Take for instance the listing for Vatapa, a Brazilian stew featuring a great concoction of flavors including peanuts, coconut milk, jalape$os and beer. As with all the main entries, a very short introduction gives the reader serving suggestions and a dash of the dish's origin. Ingredients and instructions are then presented in concise, easy-to-follow fashion. Then, five revisions of the dish are listed (other entr es have anywhere from three to 10), none taking more than a few brief sentences to lay out. The Double Shrimp Vatapa recipe, for instance, merely states, "Add 2 tablespoons dried shrimp with the raw shrimp." The dishes are presented in alphabetical order, so the Etouffee finds itself between the Enchiladas and the Fajitas while various stews pop up from beginning to end. Still, those who are in a hurry to find Shrimp Curry will appreciate this utilitarian approach, and those who are not will marvel at the variety that can be found within a mere eight-page spread: Lo Mein, Maki, Mole and Mousse. (Mar.) Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780061849879
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date:
03/17/2009
Series:
Ultimate Cookbooks
Sold by:
HARPERCOLLINS
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
256
Sales rank:
184,085
File size:
1 MB

Read an Excerpt

Buffalo Shrimp

Since the mid-1980s, Buffalo chicken wings have been a favorite in bars and restaurants across the United States and Canada. Hot and spicy, dipped into a tangy blue-cheese sauce -- what could possibly be better? Nothing, except it's not shrimp. The spicy coating works well with shrimp's sweetness -- a combination that practically screams for a cold beer or a glass of iced tea, Buffalo Shrimp are best served hot, right out of the pan.

For the Blue Cheese Dip

1 cup mayonnaise
1/2 cup sour cream (regular, low-fat, or fat-free)
1/3 cup crumbled blue cheese (such as Danish Blue or Gorgonzola; about 2 ounces)
Juice of 1 lemon
2 teaspoons onion salt
1/2 teaspoon garlic powder
1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper, or more to taste

For the Shrimp

1 tablespoon unsalted buffer, melted
1/4 cup hot sauce (such as Texas Pete or Tiger Sauce, not salsa)
8 cups peanut oil or vegetable oil
1 pound medium shrimp (35 to 40 per pound), peeled, leaving the final segment of the tail shell intact, and deveined
2 cups all-purpose flour

1. To prepare the blue cheese dip, combine the mayonnaise, sour cream, blue cheese, lemon juice, onion salt, garlic powder, and pepper in a small bowl and mix until well combined. (The dip can be prepared up to 24 hours in advance and kept covered in the refrigerator.)

2. To prepare the shrimp, combine themelted butter and hot sauce in a large mixing bowl and set aside.

3. Pour the oil into a large saucepan at least 4 inches deep and 10 inches in diameter; the oil should be 1 1/2 inches deep but reach no more than halfway up the sides of the pan. Alternatively, fill an electric deep fryer with oil according to the manufacturer's instructions. If you're using a pan, clip a deep-frying thermometer to the inside and place the pan over medium heat. Heat the oil to 375 degrees F. Adjust the heat to maintain that temperature while you prepare the shrimp. If you're using an electric deep fryer, set the temperature control to 375 degrees F.

4. Dredge the shrimp in the flour and shake off the excess. Fry the shrimp, about 10 at a time, for 1 minute, or until lightly browned. Remove the shrimp from the pan with a slotted spoon or strainer, and place on paper towels to drain.

5. Toss the hot shrimp in the butter/hot sauce glaze, coating them completely. Serve warm with the blue cheese dipping sauce.

Makes 4 appetizer servings


Shrimp Fra Diavolo

The culinary debate rages on: Is Fra Diavolo an American dish or an Italian? One side claims the dish originated in the early 1900s among Italian immigrants in New York; this camp claims the heavy sauce is strictly an Italian-American invention, not representative of the way people eat in Italy, The other side argues that Fra Diavolo was once a specialty of the Amalfi Coast. In the end, it doesn't really matter, for spicy pasta fra diavolo is on every Italian-American menu across the U.S. This recipe offers the simplest version, long a favorite in New York's Little Italy; roasting the tomatoes concentrates their flavor, balancing the garlic and red pepper. Serve hot right out of the pan, accompanied by a crisp salad and sliced fruit for dessert.

2 pounds plum tomatoes (about 12), halved
1/4 cup olive oil
6 garlic cloves, minced
1 pound spaghetti, linguine, or fettuccine
1 1/2 teaspoons red pepper flakes
1 pound medium shrimp (35 to 40 per pound), peeled and deveined, or precooked cocktail shrimp, thawed and peeled
Salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste

1. Preheat the oven to 450 degrees F.

2. Place the tomatoes cut side down in a roasting pan or a lipped baking sheet just large enough to hold them in one layer. Drizzle them evenly with the olive oil and sprinkle with the minced garlic.

3. Bake the tomatoes for I hour, or until they are lightly browned and very soft. Remove the tomatoes from the oven and allow them to cool for 10 minutes.

4. Transfer the tomatoes, garlic, and all the juices from the roasting pan to a food processor. Process until the tomatoes are puréed.

5. Cook the pasta according to the package directions in a large pot of boiling water. Drain thoroughly.

6. Meanwhile, place a large saucepan over medium heat and heat until it's hot but not smoking. Add the red pepper flakes and stir them around for 10 seconds to release their flavor. Add the tomato purée and the raw shrimp, if using. Bring the sauce to a simmer and cook, stirring constantly, until the shrimp are pink and firm, about 3 minutes. Or, if using cocktail shrimp, add them when the sauce is simmering and cook until heated through, about 1 minute. Season with salt and pepper.

7. Add the cooked pasta to the sauce and toss until well combined and heated through.

Makes 4 to 6 servings

The Ultimate Shrimp Book. Copyright © by Bruce Weinstein. Reprinted by permission of HarperCollins Publishers, Inc. All rights reserved. Available now wherever books are sold.

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