The Unabomber's Manifesto [NOOK Book]

Overview

The Unabomber was the target of one of the Federal Bureau of Investigation's (FBI) most costly investigations. Before Kaczynski's identity was known, the FBI used the title "UNABOM" ("UNiversity and Airline BOMber") to refer to his case, which resulted in the media calling him the Unabomber. The FBI pushed for the publication of Kaczynski's "Manifesto" which led to his brother and his wife recognizing Kaczynski's style of writing and beliefs from the manifesto, and tipping off the FBI. Kaczynski dismissed his ...
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The Unabomber's Manifesto

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Overview

The Unabomber was the target of one of the Federal Bureau of Investigation's (FBI) most costly investigations. Before Kaczynski's identity was known, the FBI used the title "UNABOM" ("UNiversity and Airline BOMber") to refer to his case, which resulted in the media calling him the Unabomber. The FBI pushed for the publication of Kaczynski's "Manifesto" which led to his brother and his wife recognizing Kaczynski's style of writing and beliefs from the manifesto, and tipping off the FBI. Kaczynski dismissed his court appointed lawyers because they wanted to plead insanity in order to avoid the death penalty, although Kaczynski did not believe he was insane. When it became clear that his pending trial would entail national television exposure for Kaczynski, the court entered a plea agreement, under which he pleaded guilty and was sentenced to life in prison with no possibility of parole. Theodore Kaczynski has been designated a "domestic terrorist" by the FBI. Some anarchist authors, such as John Zerzan and John Moore, have come to his defense, while holding some reservations about his actions and ideas.<P>
Kaczynski sent a letter to The New York Times on April 24, 1995 and promised "to desist from terrorism" if the Times or The Washington Post published his manifesto. In his Industrial Society and Its Future (also called the "Unabomber Manifesto"), he argued that his bombings were extreme but necessary to attract attention to the erosion of human freedom necessitated by modern technologies requiring large-scale organization.
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Product Details

  • BN ID: 2940015707816
  • Publisher: Jessecas Ebooks
  • Publication date: 9/18/2012
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 144
  • Sales rank: 609,669
  • File size: 91 KB

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
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Sort by: Showing all of 3 Customer Reviews
  • Posted July 30, 2012

    I found this to be a very interesting social commentary and regr

    I found this to be a very interesting social commentary and regret T.K. went to an extreme to drive home his point. A demonstration of the fine line between genius and insanity. I hope that during his incarceration he realizes the brevity of his acts. I hope that he will work with psychiatric professionals so they may be able to study how a brilliant mind was able to go so wrong in order to see the warning signs in others before we see another domestic terrorist of this magnitude. It does not diminish the observations he stated in his treatise, however.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 11, 2000

    Intriguing Interpretation

    I think that he has portrayed quite an overlook at prescent society and the affects that technology has brought onto the citizens. I think that he is a genius and its unfortunate that he had to express his views as he did.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 30, 2000

    a great read

    'Industrial Society and it's Future' was a intelligent outlook on today's society and the possiblities of tomorrow's. I, like most people, agree that the F.C.'s bombings were not justified in the least bit by his actions, however i do not think he used this book to justify his bombings. Instead I think he used his bombings to draw attention to his ideas. Had he just been a common critic on social ideas his ideas would most likely not be known as well as they are today. None the less, this book is definetely worth the read.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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