The Uninvited Guests: A Novel

The Uninvited Guests: A Novel

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by Sadie Jones
     
 

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A grand old manor house deep in the English countryside will open its doors to reveal the story of an unexpectedly dramatic day in the life of one eccentric, rather dysfunctional, and entirely unforgettable family. Set in the early years of the twentieth century, award-winning author Sadie Jones’s The Uninvited Guests is, in the words of Jacqueline

Overview

A grand old manor house deep in the English countryside will open its doors to reveal the story of an unexpectedly dramatic day in the life of one eccentric, rather dysfunctional, and entirely unforgettable family. Set in the early years of the twentieth century, award-winning author Sadie Jones’s The Uninvited Guests is, in the words of Jacqueline Winspear, the New York Times bestselling author of the Maisie Dobbs mysteries A Lesson in Secrets and Elegy for Eddie, “a sinister tragi-comedy of errors, in which the dark underbelly of human nature is revealed in true Shakespearean fashion.”

Editorial Reviews

Wall Street Journal
“Delicious…comparisons with Downton Abbey will be both inevitable and fair.”
Atlantic Monthly
“Jones’ clever prose and bright tone heighten her characters and setting…she adroitly draws the layers of character that are exposed as shameful secrets come to light.”
Martha Stewart Whole Living Magazine
“Enthralling…An English countryside setting, an ever-twisting plot, and gorgeously precise writing add up to one delightful novel.”
USA Today
“Exhilaratingly strange and darkly funny…veers off in a wildly surprising direction, and the way it plays out is delightful, sexy, moving-even profound…Will haunt you-but happily.”
New York Times
“Ms. Jones’s comedy of manners, which takes place over a single evening in 1912, gleefully exposes the family members’ snobbery… The author can’t resist harassing the Torringtons with the menace in the next room…”
Washington Post
“An enchanted new novel…[with] the sly, subversive dexterity of a Mozart opera or Shakespeare’s ‘A Midsummer Night’s Dream.’”
New York Times Book Review
“The author’s command of period archness tips its hat to a pantheon of social satirists: Luis Buñuel in cahoots with Oscar Wilde and Jane Austen. Jones’s caustic takedown of 1-percenter exceptionalism arrives like a divine gift to occupying party poopers everywhere.”
Christian Science Monitor
“’Downton Abbey’ takes a turn for the supernatural in Sadie Jones’s stylishly eccentric comedy of manners THE UNINVITED GUESTS...Anglophiles who admire a biting sense of humor and a tinge of the Gothic, pull up a chair.”
Ellen Shapiro
“A comedy of manners that turns downright surreal…Jones’s effervescent writing keeps the course steady-even as her characters shed their civilized veneers.”
Lev Grossman
“Entertaining…Jones is a writer of admirable narrative energy…with a painfully accurate, almost Stoppardian ear for dialogue and a delightful streak of cruelty that flirts with…the gothic.”
Mary Pols
“Vividly atmospheric…niftily deceptive…a story of shattered snobbery, transformation of character and in the end a surprising and eerily beautiful portrait of compassion…A sublimely clever book.”
Maile Meloy
“…THE UNINVITED GUESTS…defied my expectations. I saw none of it coming. I read it in one breathless sitting, and finished wanting to give it to everyone I know.”
Sarah Blake
“What a delicious read! Like something written by a wicked Jane Austen,…I was captivated by its madcap nature and then, unprepared for the strange fruit that the story became.”
Ann Patchett
“A brilliant novel…At once a shimmering comedy of manners and disturbing commentary on class…so well-written, so intricately plotted, that every page delivers some new astonishment.”
Jacqueline Winspear
“What opens as an amusing Edwardian country house tale soon becomes a sinister tragi-comedy of errors…in true Shakespearean fashion. Sadie Jones is a most talented and imaginative storyteller.”
Philip Womack
“A delightful, eerie novel…Jones expertly balances the whimsical and the strange, building things to a climax of abandon, terror and restitution…Engrossing, enjoyable.”
Robin Vivimos
“Delightful and unexpected…These well-imagined characters serve to raise stakes the reader cares about. They move beyond archetypes, becoming something unexpectedly rich and engaging.”
Maureen Corrigan
“…a delicious romp to read…Jones’ novel is as tightly constructed as one of those elaborate corsets that the Crawley women squeeze into to sashay around the drawing rooms at Downton.”

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780062116512
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date:
01/08/2013
Series:
P.S.
Edition description:
Reprint
Pages:
258
Sales rank:
499,071
Product dimensions:
5.31(w) x 8.00(h) x 0.64(d)

Read an Excerpt

The Uninvited Guests

A Novel


By Sadie Jones

HarperCollins Publishers

Copyright © 2013 Sadie Jones
All rights reserved.
ISBN: 978-0-06-211651-2


Excerpt

CHAPTER 1

EDWARD SWIFT DEPARTS


Since her marriage to Edward Swift, three years after the sudden death of her first husband Horace Torrington, Charlotte had changed her position at the breakfast table in order to accommodate her new husband's needs: specifically, aiding him in the spreading of toast and cutting of meat, owing to his having suffered the loss of his left arm at the age of twenty-three in an unfortunate encounter with the narrow wheels of a speeding gig, out of which he had fallen on the driveway of his then home in County Wicklow. Having always faced the window and wide view, now Charlotte sat on Edward's left, and faced him. Her eldest children, Emerald and Clovis, aged nineteen and twenty respectively, but for whom the word 'children' is not inaccurate at the point at which we discover them, did not like this new arrangement. Nor did they like or approve of Edward Swift; single arm notwithstanding, they found he did not fit.

Clovis Torrington balanced the pearl-handled butter knife on his middle finger and narrowed his eyes at his mother. His eyes were dramatic, and he very often narrowed them at people to great effect.

'We can't leave Sterne,' he stated.

'It would be a great shame,' acknowledged his stepfather.

Clovis curled his lip, loathingly.

'Clovis ...' his mother growled.

Edward wiped his mouth with a napkin thoroughly and stood up.

'It's all right, Charlotte,' he said, kissing her forehead as he rose. 'I'll know more when I return, Clovis. And neither you nor your sisters – nor your mother – need worry about it until then, but enjoy Emerald's birthday and try not to fret.

I'm sorry I can't be here for your guests.'

Charlotte stood, too, and linked her arm through his.

'You're both very naughty,' she said over her shoulder as they left the room.

Emerald had not spoken, but sat throughout breakfast rigid with self-restraint. Now she glanced at Clovis, tears blurring both the scowling sight of him and the vast tapestry that hung behind his head. It was a hunting scene of stags and hounds, a faded, many-layered narrative she knew by heart in all its leaping chases across the flowered forest floor. 'Fret!' said her brother with contempt at the word, stablemates as it was with sulk and pet.

Emerald shook her head. In his present mood he was the very personification of all three. 'Oh, Clovis,' she said. From the hall, Edward's voice carried easily to them: 'Clovis! Ferryman needs to be taken out. If you've time today I'd be very much obliged to you.'

His good-tempered authority would have been impressive – lovable – had the very fact of the man not been intolerable to them. Clovis was mutinous. 'He ought to take his damned horse out himself.'

Emerald pushed her plate away.

'He can't very well if he's in Manchester trying to save the house, can he?' she said, and she got up and left the room by the other door so as not to encounter her mother or stepfather again.

He did not go after her. Clovis wasn't somebody who went after people, rather people tended to go after him.

Unable to escape her misery, Emerald wandered up and down in the kitchen for a few moments, aggravating Florence Trieves and Myrtle, and then went out into the garden by the side door.

It was the last day of April. She felt the extraordinary softness of the season on her face and braced herself for a strict talking-to; if it must be audible, she ought at least to get some distance from the house.

The air was complicated with the smells of sharp new things emerging from damp soil. Small tatters of clouds dotted the watery sky. To her left was the door to the kitchen garden and stables. Ahead of her, reaching far and further, in the broadest geometrical sweep, was the country over which Sterne presided. It spread out beneath and beyond, reaching into straining, dazzling blue distance, where the fields became indistinct and hills dissolved to nothing.

The house stood on a piece of land so cleanly semicircular, so strictly rounded, that it might have been a cake-stand left behind in the landscape by some refined society of giants. It was covered with deep, soft turf as one might lay a thick rug over a table, and all the busy pattern of fields, hedges, cows and villages scattered beyond, toy miniatures a child's imagination would produce.

From the front of the house, the edge of the gardens formed a ha-ha between order and free nature. It was bordered by a knee-high sharp-trimmed box hedge, lest dogs should rush at it and fall off. Small children had been known to topple, although happily the slope, on falling, was much gentler than it first appeared. Clovis and Emerald, when much younger, had used to take running jumps off the apparent precipice, terrifying visitors unfamiliar with the topography, only to emerge laughing hilariously, covered with dandelion fluff or mud or clinging claws of long couch grass.

Emerald walked along the curve of the low box hedge with her head bowed, like a lonely merry-go-round horse.

'This helpless grief over what amounts to a few rooms and a rather poor roof is irrational,' she began, 'and frankly –' she stopped walking, '– ludicrous.'

She turned her face to the house, the windows of which glowed variously. 'There's no use looking at me like that,' she said to it.

She crossed the gravel, and went towards the other part of the garden, where were the borders and sundial. 'And there's not even the excuse of ancestry!' she said out loud again, and indignant.

And it was true; no generations of Torringtons had lived at Sterne. No generations of Torringtons had lived anywhere particularly, as far as they knew. They were a wandering, needs-must sort of family, who made their livings disparately, in clerking, mills or shipping; traveled to France for work in tailoring, or stopped at home in Somerset, Shropshire or Suffolk, to play some minor role in greater projects: designing a lowly component of a reaching cathedral or a girder-ed bridge. Some had been in business, one or two in service; there was an artist, some soldiers, all dead. All dead.

Her father's life had been distinguished only by his having the daring to buy Sterne. The house and land had been purchased rashly at the peak of what transpired to be transient – too harsh to call it flukish – financial success when, first married to Charlotte and bathed in her adoration, he had thought Torrington might be the name of the sort of man whose family would live in such a house. Horace had loved Sterne as he loved Charlotte and later, his children: loyally, generously and gratefully. The children, too, feeling that they were at the end of a line, as children always do (for indeed, they are), loved Sterne as exhausted travelers with lifetimes of migration behind them might love their first and last home. Sterne was the mythology of their parents' marriage, their father's legacy, and it had given them the very best of childhoods. Beyond that, it was beautiful, and the effect of it on their souls was inestimable; once found, they were all of them loath to give it up. Unfortunately, Horace Torrington left business for agriculture, about which he was utterly ignorant, at precisely the worst moment he could have chosen. At his untimely death he was very deeply in debt. Emerald often thought it odd that such dire financial straits should be cheerfully nicknamed 'in the red'; black was a far likelier colour. Her father's increasing debt was a dark hole into which they all might yet fall.

In reality, Sterne was two houses. One was a strange, shallow red-brick manor house of two floors and great charm, built around 1760, where the family now lived; the other – predecessor and companion – was attached behind, as the long side of the L, a great barn-like building of stone, where once one of the first lords of that manor would have laid his fires and roasted his meat, but which now stood almost empty in graceless neglect.

In the busy scullery of the New House there was a brief rise of shallow steps to a door of thick wood, mostly kept barred and bolted, which gave onto the cavern of the Old House. The two were joined utterly in the wide raftered and beamed spaces of their roofs, like Siamese twins. If one were in the attic (as the children often had been, galloping about in the dust or lying reading in the dancing window-light), only close inspection could discover the join, for the ribs of the roofs and the planks of the floors were of similar scale, and in the roof spaces the air was always dim and faded. There had been over the years much talk of demolishing the older building, but it had so very many convenient and entertaining uses, especially for storage and on rainy days, and they had not been able to do it.

A magnolia tree grew in the courtyard at the crook of the L. As a child, Emerald used to try to touch the thick flowers by leaning out of a landing casement. She would reach as far as she could, until the tight stitches of her dress strained under the arms and her fingers shook. Clovis when young, not yet having acquired a romantic view of himself, had leaned from the same window to spit. His idea was to perfect his aim and range to reach the insides of the flowers. He had to propel his saliva with vigorous conviction in order to span the gap between the tree and the house and by the time he was eight years old he had succeeded, and was triumphant. Emerald, despite her nature, aspired to practicality and surrendered her campaign to touch the petals by the age of twelve, settling instead for drawing the tree, later painting it and, still later, snipping small parts from it for closer observation under her microscope, but still never felt she had truly touched it. Perhaps a prosaic ambition – accurate spitting, for instance – is one more easily realized. Emerald had reached the driveway, a long avenue bordered by giant black yews. The yews had been meant for a hedge and cultivated as one for perhaps two hundred years but had run sluggishly away with themselves and, neglected, they formed a misshapen lumbering procession. They were wrinkles of dense growth. They were resinous twisted towers with pockets like witches' huts hidden within their vastness for playing or hiding. There were gaps between them that ought not to have been there.

Emerald, who was by day a determinedly practical young woman, often dreamed of recklessly galloping down the dark avenue to the house with the noise of hooves in her ears. Sometimes the dream sent her flying high around Sterne like a bird, with the roofs spinning away beneath her; the chimneys, stables, gardens and country filling her eyes. Then plunged back to earth by waking, she inhabited her bed alone, and wept for her lost infinity.

Now, earthbound, dispirited, she turned from the creeping yews, not caring to gaze into their dreary depths, and having reached the part of the garden laid out to flowers, she knelt by the turned soil of the border and began to cry. She had no smart words now, only childish ones. If only the Step would find some way to save us, she thought, bitterly aware that the resented step-parent was now her devoutly wished-for rescuer.

The crying, far from doing its job and clearing up, was threatening to consume her. At any moment she might fling herself face down on the flower-bed. It was her birthday; she must be happy, and soon. She sniffed, blotted her face, hard, against her forearm and stared stonily ahead. 'Good,' she said. After a moment of listless gazing at the ragged bed she began to pluck at the weeds, inching her fingertips down the weak stems to lift them from the soil. Her hands were soon chilled and muddy and she had made a limp pile beside her on the grass, reflecting that a useful task is a great comforter. Charlotte's private farewell to Edward was made in their bedroom, which sat squarely in the middle of the house above the front door. The room had a deep bay window, framed by an ancient and extravagant rose whose candy-striped buds – as well as all the county – could be seen from the bed across which Charlotte now draped herself, affecting languor in the hope it would calm Edward, who was pacing the softly bowed boards in his tightly laced shoes and causing the dressing-table mirror to rattle on its stand.

He was of medium height: a stocky, sandy sort of man with broad shoulders (his left arm had been severed cleanly and high up, in such a way as not to interfere with the set of these, although one was necessarily more developed than the other) and piercing, pale-blue eyes. At last, he stopped and sat by her. He had warmth and vigour; he said, 'Charlotte, I'll do my best for you.'

It was the sort of thing Edward often said and, unlike very many people Charlotte had known, he meant it.

Edward Swift was the youngest son of an Anglo-Irish architect. With no expectation of an inheritance, he had made his way in the world with characteristic rigour. He had read law at Trinity College Dublin and moved to London to practice. The intervening years of his life bear no relevance to this story, but suffice to say, on meeting Charlotte Torrington – a woman possessed of a high and trembling beauty, in mourning for Horace Torrington, recently struck down – he fell in love. Edward fell in love as deeply as Charlotte grieved, and there in the far-down places of sorrow and sex they met.

When they married, the older children, Emerald and Clovis, were shocked not only at the speed of their mother's apparent return to cheerfulness, but also – profoundly – at Edward's colouring, which seemed to them a betrayal in itself. Their father had been tall and very dark, with pale, black-fringed eyes so dazzling they deserve the category Torrington Eyes. Both Emerald and Clovis were dark with these same, arresting, grey-blue eyes. Their mother was fair, but had been absorbed and become a Torrington and was, after all, their mother (also, her eyes were not to be sneezed at), but Edward Swift was, well, blond.
(Continues...)


Excerpted from The Uninvited Guests by Sadie Jones. Copyright © 2013 by Sadie Jones. Excerpted by permission of HarperCollins Publishers.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

What People are saying about this

Mary Pols

“Vividly atmospheric…niftily deceptive…a story of shattered snobbery, transformation of character and in the end a surprising and eerily beautiful portrait of compassion…A sublimely clever book.”

Sarah Blake

“What a delicious read! Like something written by a wicked Jane Austen,…I was captivated by its madcap nature and then, unprepared for the strange fruit that the story became.”

Robin Vivimos

“Delightful and unexpected…These well-imagined characters serve to raise stakes the reader cares about. They move beyond archetypes, becoming something unexpectedly rich and engaging.”

Jacqueline Winspear

“What opens as an amusing Edwardian country house tale soon becomes a sinister tragi-comedy of errors…in true Shakespearean fashion. Sadie Jones is a most talented and imaginative storyteller.”

Philip Womack

“A delightful, eerie novel…Jones expertly balances the whimsical and the strange, building things to a climax of abandon, terror and restitution…Engrossing, enjoyable.”

Maureen Corrigan

“…a delicious romp to read…Jones’ novel is as tightly constructed as one of those elaborate corsets that the Crawley women squeeze into to sashay around the drawing rooms at Downton.”

Ann Patchett

“A brilliant novel…At once a shimmering comedy of manners and disturbing commentary on class…so well-written, so intricately plotted, that every page delivers some new astonishment.”

Maile Meloy

“…THE UNINVITED GUESTS…defied my expectations. I saw none of it coming. I read it in one breathless sitting, and finished wanting to give it to everyone I know.”

Lev Grossman

“Entertaining…Jones is a writer of admirable narrative energy…with a painfully accurate, almost Stoppardian ear for dialogue and a delightful streak of cruelty that flirts with…the gothic.”

Meet the Author

Sadie Jones is the author of four novels, including The Outcast, winner of the Costa First Novel Award in Great Britain and a finalist for the Orange Prize for Fiction and the Los Angeles Times Book Prize/Art Seidenbaum Award for First Fiction, Small Wars, and the bestselling The Uninvited Guests. She lives in London.

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The Uninvited Guests 3.2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 70 reviews.
Ixachel More than 1 year ago
I wanted to read The Uninvited Guests from the moment I heard about the book. Imagine my joy, then, when I won an advance reader copy on Goodreads! Sadie Jones’ The Uninvited Guests introduces us to the eccentric, dysfunctional Torrington-Swift family. There is the self-centered Charlotte Torrington-Swift, her doting second husband Edward Swift, and the three children of her previous marriage: Clovis, Emerald, and Imogen (aka Smudge). They live at Stern, a stately manor in the English countryside, but financial issues could mean them losing it. Edward is off to secure funds to save the home while those left behind celebrate Emeralds twentieth birthday. Then, disaster. A train accident sends some restless uninvited guests their way, including one Charles Traversham-Beechers. He claims to know of Charlotte's past, and he may just be wicked enough to reveal it. Of all the characters, the most likeable may be Emerald, the capable yet resigned-to-her-fate birthday girl, followed closely by her odd and neglected sister Smudge. Clovis is quite the snob, and Charlotte an absent and vain mother. We also meet the Swift-Torrington housekeepers Myrtle and Florence, and the guests invited to Emeralds soiree: John Buchanan, Ernest and Patience Sutton, and, of course, Charles Traversham-Beechers. They range from the bland to the vicious, though some change their tune by the books end. The story itself is very entertaining and well written. Told in third-persons, the narration is funny, witty, and just a bit quirky. I found myself laughing on quite a few occassions. Many that books that claim to be humorous satire rarely hit their mark for me, but this book had its true laugh-out-loud moments. Though a satire, a comedy of manners, the bigger message of the novel is not lost. We see the worst brought out in these society folk, both in how they treat each other and how they treat those they believe are beneath them. But we also see them grow and learn. Some, as I’ve mentioned, mature greatly through the novel and are changed for the better by the experience. This book is clever, funny, and thoroughly entertaining. I recommend it to anyone who enjoys satirical novels, and anyone who wants a good look at human nature at its best and worst. Or just anyone looking for a wildly adventurous and truly bizarre tale.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I bought this book for my wife but needed a quick read so I picked it up. Normally this is not a genre I would read. The characters were well developed and while the plot at the beginning was not overly compelling there was enough interest in the characters to keep going. Once the uninvited guests arrive the story takes some interesting twists which I won't reveal here lest I spoil the plot. I'll just say the novel goes where I had no idea it was headed based on the start. Overall it was an enjoyable read.
mmr More than 1 year ago
I liked this book but it is not for everyone. It is a Austen-like mystery.
nikkino More than 1 year ago
This was an enchanting book. It was beautifully written and the tale was beautifully woven. I felt like I was there, and I was sad when the book ended.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I'm not quite sure how to describe this book. I enjoyed, it but at the same time, found it a bit fragmented. It almost seemd as though the author shifted the story line while writing this book. It seemd to take a twist that didn't quite flow as smooth as it should have. Still, I did find I wanted to keep reading to see what happened next.
shirleeanne More than 1 year ago
Didn't find it entertaining. Maybe because I didn't get the British humor. I thought it was boring and too imaginary.
Rosebud100 More than 1 year ago
I couldn't finish this book. The plot was so silly and ridiculous. I wasn't entertained nor did I care what happened to anyone in the book. What is the point of reading the novel when you have lost all interest in it.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I bought this based on a recommendation in Family Circle magazine. Was extremely disappointed. Cliched characters, situations introduced and left unresolved, and the supernatural element was clumsily addressed. I'm willing to suspend disbelief, but not for writing as poor as this.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
It isn't funny, intriguing, scarey, mysterious - I really can't find anything to recommend it. The characters aren't quirky enough to carry it off as a comedy, and too dysfunctional to participate in their own tale. And the ending, well predictable and dull.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Strange. So strange. Odd storyline with many unbelievable elements and no feeling of connection to any characters. Wish I'd saved my money.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
To buy and read this book???! From the very first page, I knew I wasn't going to like it. Well, I was wrong: I hated it. You think the story is about one thing, then it goes another way, makes another turn, then ends up back at the beginning. And the characters are awful people, for the most part. You have to give the author credit for getting it published, though. Not sure how, but she did.
booksandteainthemorning More than 1 year ago
This is an unusual tale with a few twists. British siblings Emerald, Clovis, and Smudge prepare to celebrate Emerald's birthday. Many "uninvited guests" arrive, creating stress for all, including the staff and the narcissistic mother. I enjoyed the humorous dialogue between Emerald and Clovis; however, I believe the plot could have been more developed, particularly, in the middle and end of the book.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Couldnt get into it. I dont like not even finishing a book, just cant sorry
Babette-dYveine More than 1 year ago
This was one of the weirdest books I have ever read.  It was difficult to follow and I couldn't figure out what was happening.  Was it supposed to be a ghost story, a satire or what?  I finished it because once I begin a book I want to know what happens, but I didn't find the ending satisfying at all.
kyohin More than 1 year ago
I'm giving this three stars, but I have never really come down on the side of recommending it to anyone. I don't mind odd stories, but this oddity did not intrigue me.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
On the heels of Downton Abbey wrapping up a second season, I was very eager to stay connected to this time period in England and The Uninvited Guests was a strong recommend. While I enjoyed the book, the cold dreariness of the characters made it difficult to have much of an emotional connection, with the exception of the neglected daughter, Smudge (who provides the reader with a little quirkiness and humor). The story takes a sudden (and yet predictable) turn and leaves the reader wanting more than what the ending offered. While the book certainly didn't meet my expectations, I would recommend it as "filler reading" between better book choices.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Kept the interest going . Full of eccentric characters with many twist and turns . Enjoyable read
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Very interesting. Fans of Downton Abbey will love this book. It reads like fiction and almost hard to believe that this woman lived this life. I loved it.
Whodunnit More than 1 year ago
I was intrigued by this book's description, and curious at some of the negative reviews, but fortunately I went with the more positive ones and purchased it anyway. And I'm glad I did. I might add that I'm in my 60's and have read a mountain of books in my lifetime. When I was young and attempted reading books by the Brontes and Jane Austin, I admit I was a little overwhelmed. I didn't truly appreciated them or British humor until I was more mature. I found the book to be a delight. I love descriptive books with interesting characters and odd "happenings". It's all very Dickensian. And yes it's not roll on the floor laughing humor, but it's low key chuckling humor.  This is a book you want to savor and take time understanding all the description and nuances that bring the story to life. It's not a fast read, and it's not saturated with sex, violence and grossness, which is the standard for many books today. This author used a tasteful style not often used anymore, and the story felt more authentic because of it. There's a lot of substance to this story. It's one I will remember.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
QueSeraSera More than 1 year ago
I thought this would be a lot better than it actually was.  It starts off strong but I honestly couldn't wait to get it over with.  The characters (especially the mother) are not very likeable and many times during the novel I wanted to smack them upside the head to get them to do the right thing.   
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I thought this would be a Georgette Heyer type novel. It was not. It was okay reading but at 64 I'm not so much into the supernatural/undead which was definitely a big component of this book. I enjoyed it but wouldn't read another like it.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
BOOO!!!hi!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago