The UNIX Programming Environment

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Overview

Designed for first-time and experienced users, this book describes the UNIX® programming environment and philosophy in detail. Readers will gain an understanding not only of how to use the system, its components, and the programs, but also how these fit into the total environment.

This is Kernighan's concise, classic exposition on how to make optimal use of the programming facilities built into Unix. Very highly recommended.

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Editorial Reviews

Booknews
Both novice and experienced users will appreciate this work. It provides an understanding not only of how to use the system, its components, and programs, but also how they fit into the total UNIX environment. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780139376818
  • Publisher: Prentice Hall
  • Publication date: 1/28/1984
  • Series: Prentice-Hall Software Series
  • Edition description: 1st
  • Pages: 347
  • Sales rank: 671,813
  • Product dimensions: 7.00 (w) x 8.90 (h) x 0.80 (d)

Table of Contents

1. UNIX for Beginners.

2. The File System.

3. Using the Shell.

4. Filters.

5. Shell Programming.

6. Programming with Standard I/0.

7. UNIX System Calls.

8. Program Development.

9. Document Preparation.

Epilog.

Appendices.

Index.

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Sort by: Showing all of 3 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 20, 2000

    Oldies but goldies

    Merely half an inch thick, and employing the same cover design - or lack of it - as the C Programming Language, this is probably the least pretentious looking book on my bookshelf. However, the look is misleading - there are very few books, regardless of length, that aim to teach you as much as this one, and even fewer than succeed in it. <P>Unix programming environment might sound a rather ambitious title nowadays, when a tutorial on each specialized tool can easily exceed 400 pages. However, this one actually delivers everything that it promises. Kernighan and Pike start with the basic description of Unix file system and the basic set of commands, continue with the command shell, redirection and piping. Next come the filters: regular expressions, grep, sort, sed and awk. At that point, the reader is ready for the full-fledged treatment of the command shell programming. Next come standard I/O and Unix system calls, followed by the program development tools: make, lex and yacc. The course is concluded with a chapter on document formatting with troff. <P>The chapters on I/O and system calls imply familiarity with the C programming language. The already mentioned tutorial on C by Kernighan and Ritchie, written in much the same style and spirit, can serve as the introduction to it. Also, while the book keeps up with its age remarkably well, there are some points where the described Unix system differs from the modern POSIX systems (most user commands are however backward compatible and still accept the old syntax). The required changes are really minor, but can nevertheles annoy an innocent reader. <P>The book belongs to nowadays rare breed of books on computers written for engineers and CS students rather than for dummies and idiots. Although primarily written for individual study, it can be used for one-semester course on Unix (like in C Programming Language, the exercises are lacking solutions, though). I would love to see it made-up with POSIX syntax and generally reflecting the changes made to Unix during the past 15 years.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 9, 2003

    Very good but not perfect.

    I really like this book. It's very short, however it's enough to get you into UNIX business. The only thing I didn't like it's the way the C programs are written. In my opinion the code is cumbersome, and very confusing. It could be implemented much easier and more straightforward. I do recommend this book.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 3, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

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