The Unnamable

The Unnamable

by Samuel Beckett, Sean Barrett
     
 

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Few works of contemporary literature are so universally acclaimed as central to our understanding of the human experience as Nobel Prize winner Samuel Beckett's famous trilogy. Molloy, the first of these masterpieces, appeared in French in 1951. It was followed seven months later by Malone Dies and two years later by The Unnamable. All threeSee more details below

Overview

Few works of contemporary literature are so universally acclaimed as central to our understanding of the human experience as Nobel Prize winner Samuel Beckett's famous trilogy. Molloy, the first of these masterpieces, appeared in French in 1951. It was followed seven months later by Malone Dies and two years later by The Unnamable. All three have been rendered into English by the author.

Editorial Reviews

New York Times Book Review
"More powerful and important than Godot... Mr. Beckett seeks to empty the novel of its usual recognizable objects -- plot, situation, characters -- and yet to keep the reader interested and moved. Beckett is one of the most positive writers alive. Behind all his mournful blasphemies against man there is real love. And he is genuine: every sentence is written as if it has been lived."

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9789626343371
Publisher:
Naxos Audiobooks Ltd.
Publication date:
08/28/2005
Edition description:
Unabridged, 5 CDs, 6 hours
Product dimensions:
5.68(w) x 4.92(h) x 0.94(d)

What People are saying about this

A. Alvarez
In the trilogy, Beckett is creating his own death in prose, quarrying right down to that subterranean country of his heart....What remains is a terminal vision, a terminal style, and, from the point of view of possible development, a work at least as aesthetically terminal as Finnegan's Wake.
Richard Ellmann
Samuel Beckett is sui generis...he has given a voice to the decrepit and maimed and inarticulate, men and women at the end of their tether, past prose or pretense, past claim of meaningful existence. He seems to say that only there and then, as metabolism lowers, amidt God's paucity, not his plenty, can the core of the human condition be approached...yet his musical cadences, his wrought and precise sentences, cannot help but stave off the void...like salamadars, we survive in his fires.

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