The Unredeemed Captive: A Family Story from Early America

( 2 )

Overview

Nominated for the National Book Award, this book is set in colonial Massachusetts where, in 1704, a French and Indian war party descended on the village of Deerfield, abducting a Puritan minister and his children. Although John Williams was eventually released, his daughter horrified the family by staying with her captors and marrying a Mohawk husband.

An important work of history about life in Colonial America. Early in 1704, a band of Indians and Frenchmen ...

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The Unredeemed Captive: A Family Story from Early America

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Overview

Nominated for the National Book Award, this book is set in colonial Massachusetts where, in 1704, a French and Indian war party descended on the village of Deerfield, abducting a Puritan minister and his children. Although John Williams was eventually released, his daughter horrified the family by staying with her captors and marrying a Mohawk husband.

An important work of history about life in Colonial America. Early in 1704, a band of Indians and Frenchmen attacked a Massachusetts village, killing 50 and capturing 100--including Puritan minister John Williams and his five children. When at last they were released, Williams' young daughter Eunice refused to leave her Indian captors.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"A masterpiece...recovering for us the poignant story of lives and families shattered and then painfully knitted together again in the complex cultural encounters between English, French, and Mohawk peoples in eighteenth-century America. There is nothing quite like it in our literature. It is a stunning achievement that should change forever the way we write and tell stories about the American past."—William Cronon
Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
The armed conflicts of the 18th century between the English colonies in North America and the French settlements that stretched into Canada were fought with the support of Native American allies. Demos, a Yale history professor Entertaining Satan: Witchcraft and the Culture of Early New England , draws on primary source material to provide a perceptive analysis of the cultural encounters that occurred between combatants by detailing the experiences of the John Williams family. Williams, a Puritan minister, and his family were captured in 1704 in their Massachusetts home by a group of Frenchmen and Native Americans, and forced to march to Canada. Although he and four of his children were later released, his wife died on the march and his daughter, Eunice, became a convert to Catholicism and married a Native American. Despite the ongoing attempts of her father and brother to persuade Eunice to return to Massachusetts, she would agree only to brief visits and lived in a Native American settlement until her death at the age of 95. Illustrations not seen by PW. History Book Club main selection ; BOMC alternate . Apr.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780679759614
  • Publisher: Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group
  • Publication date: 4/15/1995
  • Series: Vintage Series
  • Edition description: Reprint
  • Pages: 336
  • Sales rank: 151,948
  • Product dimensions: 5.13 (w) x 8.00 (h) x 0.67 (d)

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 2 )
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Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 7, 2012

    Brings History Alive

    This well researched book, from both Canadian and Colonial records, discusses the 1704 Raid by Indians on Deerfield, Massachusetts. It focuses mainly on Eunice Williams and others of Rev. John Williams family who were captured and taken to Canada. Many of the captives were killed on the trek northward; some found their way over time back to Deerfield - either escaping or paying for their release; some decided to stay and marry Native Americans.

    Having ancestors who lived in Deerfield during this period made this book especially meaningful and truly brought history alive.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 23, 2012

    Fantastic

    I had to read this book for a college course, and I'm glad I did! This part of American history (especially New England related history) is rarely taught in history classes (prior to this book, I didn't even realize the volatile nature of the region). It's very well researched and easy to read.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews

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