The unveiling of Lhasa

The unveiling of Lhasa

by Edmund Candler
     
 
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Overview

Purchase of this book includes free trial access to www.million-books.com where you can read more than a million books for free.
This is an OCR edition with typos.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
2940021978453
Publisher:
London : Nelson
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
450 KB

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CHAPTER IV PHARI JONG February 15. Icy winds and suffocating smoke are not conducive to a literary style, though they sometimes inspire a rude eloquence that is quite unfit for publication. As I write we are huddling over the mess-room brazier our youngest optimist would not call it a fire. Men drop in now and then from fatigue duty, and utter an incisive phrase that expresses the general feeling, while we who write for an enlightened public must sacrifice force for euphemism. A week at Phari dispels all illusions ; only a bargee could adequately describe the place. Yet the elements, which 'feelingly persuade us' what we are, sometimes inspire us with the eloquence of discomfort. At Gautsa the air was scented with the fragrance of warm pine-trees, and there was no indication of winter save the ice on the Ammo Chu. The torrent roared boisterously beneath its frozen surface, and threw up little tentacles of frozen spray, which glistened fantastically in the sun. Three miles further up the stream the wood-belt endsabruptly; then, after another three miles, one passes the last stunted bush; after that there is nothing but brown earth and yellow withered grass. Five miles above Gautsa is Dotah, the most cheerless camp on the march. The wind blows through the gorge unceasingly, and penetrates to the bone. On the left bank of the stream is the frozen waterfall, which might be worshipped by the fanciful and superstitious as embodying the genius of the place, hard and resistless, a crystallized monument of the implacable spirit of Nature in these high places. At Kamparab, where we camped, two miles higher up the stream, the thermometer fell to 14 below zero. Close by is the meeting-place ofthe sources of the Ammo Chu. All the plain is undermined with the warrens of the l...

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