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The Urban Hen: A practical guide to keeping poultry in a town or city
     

The Urban Hen: A practical guide to keeping poultry in a town or city

5.0 1
by Paul Peacock
 

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"The Urban Hen" is the perfect companion for the city poultry keeper and shows you how to maintain a happy, healthy garden or backyard flock in towns and cities. Paul Peacock shows you how to: find the best poultry for the small garden and house them properly, feed your birds, tune in to their daily needs and enjoy your own eggs; avoid annoying the neighbours by

Overview

"The Urban Hen" is the perfect companion for the city poultry keeper and shows you how to maintain a happy, healthy garden or backyard flock in towns and cities. Paul Peacock shows you how to: find the best poultry for the small garden and house them properly, feed your birds, tune in to their daily needs and enjoy your own eggs; avoid annoying the neighbours by showing that it is possible to keep poultry without attracting unwelcome pests; recognise healthy happy birds and learn their daily routine; recognise poorly hens; treat them or get help; and, incubate and care for fertilised eggs and raise chicks.

Editorial Reviews

www.gardenaction.co.uk
The "Urban Hen" takes you step by step through everything you will ever need to know about keeping hens. We thoroughly recommend this book to any one thinking about keeping chickens. It highlights the difficulties and the advantages in very clear terms. And if you decide to keep chickens then this book has everything you need to feed and care for them.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781848034631
Publisher:
Little, Brown Book Group
Publication date:
07/01/2011
Sold by:
Hachette Digital, Inc.
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
300
File size:
3 MB

Related Subjects

Meet the Author

Author Paul Peacock has written over 30 books on gardening, self sufficiency, curing meats, making cheese and sausages, keeping bees and poultry. He writes for the Daily Mirror as Mr Digwell, the cartoon gardener - the longest running gardening newspaper column in the world.

He has been a regular contributor to BBC Radio 4's Gardener's Question Time and appeared on numerous television shows. He runs the www.citycottage.co.uk website dedicated to the simple idea that the best food you will ever eat is cooked at home.

Pauls passion for fish was kickstarted by a plate of fritto misto de mare, which remains his favourite dish (recipe in the book) and queenies cooked in cream topped with cheddar( recipe also in this book)!
He believes the best fish in the world come from UK waters, that's why everyone buys it, far and wide, and, as Paul points out in this book, it is a tragedy the British hardly eat any of it.

This book is hopefully a tiny step on the way to changing that.

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The Urban Hen 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
M_R_Shah More than 1 year ago
The Urban Hen is an exceptional guide to backyard poultry farming, covering all the essentials to establishing and maintaining a poultry farm in the city. Using his experience as editor of the Home Farmer Magazine, Paul Peacock delves into issues including, but not limited to the anatomy of the chicken, potential diseases, and poultry care. More importantly, Peacock strives to build a homely relationship, a strong bond between poultry and the owner. Eggs that taste great and manure for the garden will be two of many benefits the reader will discover. With hectic schedules and a busy lifestyle, 21st century urbanized society will likely seek the easy way out for their poultry needs: the supermarket. In a nutshell, Paul persuades the reader to keep hens because "poultry are pretty and simply being near them gladdens the heart and lifts the spirit." Moreover, a poultry farm allows today's youth to step away from their sedentary lifestyle and appreciate the beauty of nature while instilling a sense of "care and responsibility" in children. For those new to chickens, Peacock lays the ground rules clearly and concisely. The first step is to understand chickens, their habitat, and the environment in which they are most happy. For instance, Peacock reveals that "hens do well in bright, airy, calm conditions"; however, they prefer the summer shade and a shelter during the rainy winters. Essentially, it is imperative to conceal the hen hut from inquisitive passersby including children and curious animals (e.g. raptors, foxes, and rats). The second aspect of keeping poultry goes hand in hand with the first: ensuring the health of your chickens. Painting an image with words, Peacock masterfully concocts a chapter dedicated to the myriad diseases afflicting chickens. Not unlike humans, poultry diseases can range from simple bacteria and virus infections to "morphological problems of deformations and genetic disorders." As potential poultry farmers, Peacock strongly urges the individual to pay attention to the abnormal signs and be prepared to "cull" the birds when the time is near. It is not a crime to put these birds out of their misery, but it is unethical to allow them to suffer endlessly. Ultimately, Paul Peacock's The Urban Hen is educational, even incorporating an extensive glossary to explain the nuances of poultry care in straight-forward language. Peacock references a series of poultry clubs--including the famous "Poultry Club of Great Britain" for pure breeds--as a resource for additional help and access to materials and equipment. Overall, The Urban Hen is a must read that provides many valuables lessons for not only the beginner but also the experienced poultry farmers.