Vanished Child (Boston Mystery Series

( 2 )

Overview

"Truly mesmerizing."
MILWAUKEE JOURNAL New England, 1887. The millionaire William Knight is brutally murdered and the only witness is his grandchild, Richard, who himself disappears, and is presumed dead. Eighteen years later, Richard is "recognized" in Switzerland in the person of Alexander von Reisden, and William Knight's only son, Gilbert, is convinced that this man is the long lost child. Reisden, himself, has no memory of any childhood, and his own growing obsession with finding the real Richard is leading ...
See more details below
Available through our Marketplace sellers.
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (69) from $1.99   
  • New (1) from $45.00   
  • Used (68) from $1.99   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Note: Marketplace items are not eligible for any BN.com coupons and promotions
$45.00
Seller since 2014

Feedback rating:

(187)

Condition:

New — never opened or used in original packaging.

Like New — packaging may have been opened. A "Like New" item is suitable to give as a gift.

Very Good — may have minor signs of wear on packaging but item works perfectly and has no damage.

Good — item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Acceptable — item is in working order but may show signs of wear such as scratches or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Used — An item that has been opened and may show signs of wear. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Refurbished — A used item that has been renewed or updated and verified to be in proper working condition. Not necessarily completed by the original manufacturer.

New
Brand new.

Ships from: acton, MA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Close
Sort by
Sending request ...

Overview

"Truly mesmerizing."
MILWAUKEE JOURNAL New England, 1887. The millionaire William Knight is brutally murdered and the only witness is his grandchild, Richard, who himself disappears, and is presumed dead. Eighteen years later, Richard is "recognized" in Switzerland in the person of Alexander von Reisden, and William Knight's only son, Gilbert, is convinced that this man is the long lost child. Reisden, himself, has no memory of any childhood, and his own growing obsession with finding the real Richard is leading him closer to a shattering thruth. And to a killer, still at large....
"A most satisfying tale."
NEW YORK DAILY NEWS

A NEW YORK TIMES NOTABLE BOOK

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Smith's first novel is a stunning tale of amnesia, child abuse and murder in turn-of-the-century New England. (Dec.)
Library Journal
A chance encounter with a stranger on a train platform tears Alexander von Reisden from his ascetic devotion to his chemistry lab, and plunges him into a 19-year-old mystery involving the murder of a wealthy Bostonian and the disappearance of his grandson. Is von Reisden, as the stranger first thought, the missing heir to the Knight fortune or is he the European aristocrat he always believed himself to be? Helping the Knights face the demons of their past, von Reisden is forced to confront his own. Employing subtle Jamesian touches and his milieu of turn-of-the-century Boston, Smith deftly explores both the actual and the psychological mysteries surrounding the case. Highly recommended.-- Cynthia Johnson Whealler, Cary Memorial Lib., Lexington, Mass.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780345381644
  • Publisher: Random House Publishing Group
  • Publication date: 11/28/1993
  • Series: Boston Mysteries Series
  • Format: Mass Market Paperback
  • Edition description: REPRINT
  • Pages: 304
  • Product dimensions: 4.18 (w) x 6.88 (h) x 0.76 (d)

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 2 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(1)

4 Star

(1)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 25, 2000

    The Vanished Child is marvelous.

    The Vanished Child is marvelous. I am actually writing this review about 1 1/2 years after I read it and it is still very clear in my mind. I read a lot of books and sadly many of them are something I remember reading, but not being involved in. I find myself visiting with the characters in this book from time to time. I especially liked the scene where Peridita is given a feminist pin and tucks it under her hat to better contemplate it. I enjoyed the prose, I found it charming. I loved the characters to be overly modern. In fact, I think Sarah Smith got it right on the head. After all, we are talking about contemporaries of Nietzsche, Freud and Susan B. Anthony. The main characters (Alexander and Peridita) shared something of the outsider's perspective of Nietzsche, Freud and Susan B. Anthony. The respectable class would at best feel an uneasy tolerance of them. Perdita being blind AND an artist. Alexander dark, complex and brooding - - a bit like Heathcliff and look how things turned out for him! Other than the Alienist, I cannot think of any other book set in this period that picks up and runs these complex elements of one of the most interesting periods of intellectual history. However, the Alienist is more of a face paced thriller and The Vanished Child is more cerebral. Both are well worth reading.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 10, 2000

    The mystery and supense never vanish

    Intriguing characters - keeps you questioning until the very end.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)