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The Wall Street Journal Almanac, 1998
     

The Wall Street Journal Almanac, 1998

by Wall Street Journal, Ronald J. Alsop (Editor)
 
You already depend on The Wall Street Journal for eye-opening analysis and incisive interpretation of the events, trends, and issues that shape our times. Now Wall Street Journal writers and editors from around the world have drawn on their own extensive knowledge and access to the most authoritative sources of information to produce this reference to use

Overview

You already depend on The Wall Street Journal for eye-opening analysis and incisive interpretation of the events, trends, and issues that shape our times. Now Wall Street Journal writers and editors from around the world have drawn on their own extensive knowledge and access to the most authoritative sources of information to produce this reference to use every day, all year long.



  • 1997 in Review: The headlines... global hot spots... major market-moving business stories... top newsmakers



  • Politics & Policy: The outlook for Clinton's remaining years in office... profiles of Washington's movers and shakers... the major actions of the President, Congress, and the Supreme Court in 1997




  • Business & the Economy: The state of the economy and the outlook for the future... the year's biggest business deals... hottest products and brands... the new work force in America



  • Money & Investing: The financial markets... mutual funds... personal finance... taxes... real estate



  • Technology & Science: Navigating the Internet... the fast-moving computer and telecommunications industries



  • The World: Major currents in world politics and economics... fastest growing regions... emerging consumer markets... nation-by-nation surveys




  • Living in America: The demographic portrait... state and city statistics... the new world of medicine... crime rates... education... energy and the environment



    Travel & Transportation: Financial trends in thetravel industry... top-selling car models... airline safety data... Dow Jones Travel Cost Index



  • Media & Entertainment: Box office and home video hits... the television picture... bestselling books... the music business... prize winners—Nobels, Pulitzers, Oscars, and Grammys



  • Sports: The top sports news... player salaries... fitness trends... Olympics, pro football, basketball, and baseball statistics



    With essays and analysis of the most important issues and trends of the year by leading journalists from The Wall Street Journal.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780345405210
Publisher:
Random House Publishing Group
Publication date:
11/11/1997
Pages:
1137
Product dimensions:
5.54(w) x 8.21(h) x 2.04(d)

Read an Excerpt

As investments go, your house still probably doesn't measure up to your mutual fund.

But home values around the nation, after years of marginal growth,are finally on the rise. The U.S. Office of Housing Enterprise Oversight, which monitors government-sponsored mortgage buyers Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, said the median price for existing homes rose 3.6% in 1996 nationwide--the second year in a row home appreciation grew faster than the consumer price index, and only the second time since 1989. Meanwhile, the National Association of Home Builders says new home prices in 1996 rose 4.6%, the largest increase in seven years.

Moribund markets like Boston and Washington, D.C., have seen price increases. Even in California, where the value of existing homes has fallen almost 10% since 1992, there's a glimmer of a resurgence. Richard P. Nesbitt, branch manager of a Coldwell Banker Residential Real Estate office in San Diego, predicts homes in his market will appreciate 3% to 5% after six years of flat or falling prices. Home prices "are coming back. It's exciting," he says....

In any case, few predict that homes will appreciate the way they did in the 1970s and 1980s. "It's steady, without big peaks and valleys," says Edward W. Marrs, executive director of the National Home Buying Institute, a consumer group. "It's good for the consumer and good for the industry."

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